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Jeffrey W. Howard [4]Jeffrey N. Howard [1]Jeffrey Howard [1]
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Profile: Jeffrey Howard (University College London)
  1.  34
    Punishment, Socially Deprived Offenders, and Democratic Community.Jeffrey Howard - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):121-136.
    The idea that victims of social injustice who commit crimes ought not to be subject to punishment has attracted serious attention in recent legal and political philosophy. R. A. Duff has argued, for example, a states that perpetrates social injustice lacks the standing to punish victims of such injustice who commit crimes. A crucial premiss in his argument concerns the fact that when courts in liberal society mete out legitimate criminal punishments, they are conceived as acting in the name of (...)
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  2.  8
    Moral Subversion and Structural Entrapment.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2015 - Journal of Political Philosophy 24 (1):24-46.
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  3.  3
    Kidnapped: The Ethics of Paying Ransoms.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3).
    Should governments pay ransoms to terrorist organisations that unjustly kidnap their citizens? The United Kingdom and the United States refuse to negotiate with terrorist groups that kidnap and threaten to kill their people. In contrast, continental European countries, such as France and Germany, have regularly paid ransoms to rescue hostages. Who is right? This debate has raged in the public domain in recent years, but no sustained attempt has been made to subject the matter to philosophical scrutiny. This article explores (...)
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  4.  13
    Punishment as Moral Fortification.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (1):45-75.
    The proposal that the criminal justice system should focus on rehabilitation – rather than retribution, deterrence, or expressive denunciation – is among the least popular ideas in legal philosophy. Foremost among rehabilitation’s alleged weaknesses is that it views criminals as blameless patients to be treated, rather than culpable moral agents to be held accountable. This article offers a new interpretation of the rehabilitative approach that is immune to this objection and that furnishes the moral foundation that this approach has lacked. (...)
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  5.  30
    Let's Make a Deal: Quality and Availability of Second-Stage Information as a Catalyst for Change.Jeffrey N. Howard, Charles G. Lambdin & Darcee L. Datteri - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (3):248 – 272.
    The Monty Hall Problem (MHP), a process of two-stage decision making, was presented in atypical form via a custom software game. Differing from the normal three-box MHP, the game added one additional box on-screen for each game—culminating on game 23 with 25 on-screen boxes to initially choose from. A total of 108 participants played 23 games (trials) in one of four conditions; (1) “Vanish” condition—all non-winning boxes totally removed from the screen; (2) “Empty” condition—all non-winning boxes remain on-screen, but with (...)
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  6. The Labors of Justice: Democracy, Respect, and Judicial Review.Jeffrey W. Howard - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-24.
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