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Karin Murris [28]Karin Saskia Murris [2]
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  1. The Epistemic Challenge of Hearing Child’s Voice.Karin Murris - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):245-259.
    Classical conceptual distinctions in philosophy of education assume an individualistic subjectivity and hide the learning that can take place in the space between child (as educator) and adult (as learner). Grounded in two examples from experience I develop the argument that adults often put metaphorical sticks in their ears in their educational encounters with children. Hearers’ prejudices cause them to miss out on knowledge offered by the child, but not heard by the adult. This has to do with how adults (...)
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  2.  89
    The Philosophy for Children Curriculum: Resisting ‘Teacher Proof’ Texts and the Formation of the Ideal Philosopher Child.Karin Murris - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):63-78.
    The philosophy for children curriculum was specially written by Matthew Lipman and colleagues for the teaching of philosophy by non-philosophically educated teachers from foundation phase to further education colleges. In this article I argue that such a curriculum is neither a necessary, not a sufficient condition for the teaching of philosophical thinking. The philosophical knowledge and pedagogical tact of the teacher remains salient, in that the open-ended and unpredictable nature of philosophical enquiry demands of teachers to think in the moment (...)
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  3.  62
    Philosophy with Children, the Stingray and the Educative Value of Disequilibrium.Karin Saskia Murris - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):667-685.
    Philosophy with children (P4C) 1 presents significant positive challenges for educators. Its 'community of enquiry' pedagogy assumes not only an epistemological shift in the role of the educator, but also a different ontology of 'child' and balance of power between educator and learner. After a brief historical sketch and an outline of the diversity among P4C practitioners, epistemological uncertainty in teaching P4C is crystallised in a succinct overview of theoretical and practical tensions that are a direct result of the implementation (...)
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  4. Can Children Do Philosophy?Karin Murris - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (2):261–279.
    Some philosophers claim that young children cannot do philosophy. This paper examines some of those claims, and puts forward arguments against them. Our beliefs that children cannot do philosophy are based on philosophical assumptions about children, their thinking and about philosophy. Many of those assumptions remain unquestioned by critics of Philosophy with Children. My conclusion is that the idea that very young children can do philosophy has not only significant consequences for how we should educate young children, but also for (...)
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  5.  14
    Diffracting Diffractive Readings of Texts as Methodology: Some Propositions.Karin Murris & Vivienne Bozalek - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (14):1504-1517.
    Re-turning to our experiences of putting a diffractive methodology to work ourselves, as well as engaging with the writings of Donna Haraway and Karen Barad, we produce some propositions re...
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  6.  33
    Listening-as-Usual: A Response to Michael Hand.Karin Murris - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (3):331-335.
    In her book Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing , Miranda Fricker introduces the helpful notion of “identity prejudice” as “a label for prejudices against people qua social type” . She focuses on race, class and gender, and Michael Hand in his article What Do Kids Know? A response to Karin Murris is indeed correct when he states that I have applied her arguments to age as a category of epistemic exclusion.I argue that among the usual contenders of (...)
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  7.  17
    Intra-Generational Education: Imagining a Post-Age Pedagogy.Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (10).
    This article discusses the idea of intra-generational education. Drawing on Braidotti’s nomadic subject and Barad’s conception of agency, we consider what intra-generational education might look like ontologically, in the light of critical posthumanism, in terms of natureculture world, nomadism and a vibrant indeterminacy of knowing subjects. In order to explore the idea of intra-generationalism and its pedagogical implications, we introduce four concepts: homelessness, agelessness, playfulness and wakefulness. These may appear improbable in the context of education policy-making today, but they are (...)
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  8.  6
    Learning as ‘Worlding’: De-Centring Gert Biesta’s ‘Non-Egological’ Education.Karin Murris - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (28).
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  9.  77
    Child as Educator: Introduction to the Special Issue. [REVIEW]Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):217-227.
  10.  21
    Student Teachers Investigating the Morality of Corporal Punishment in South Africa.Karin Murris - 2012 - Ethics and Education 7 (1):45 - 58.
    Practitioners of education in South Africa (SA) struggle painfully between the extremes of its authoritarian and deeply religious roots that prescribe blind obedience to people in authority and their elders, and the demands of open-mindedness, critical thinking and also solidarity required for democratic citizenship. A particular pedagogy was used with some 400 student teachers to investigate philosophically the rights and wrongs of corporal punishment in schools. This article justifies the use of this particular approach to moral education ? despite its (...)
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  11.  45
    The Provocation of an Epistemological Shift in Teacher Education Through Philosophy with Children.Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (2):285-303.
    Experience indicates that the questioning and democratic nature of the community of enquiry can be demanding and unsettling for teachers, presenting unaccustomed challenges and moral dilemmas. This paper argues that such significant episodes in the practice of Philosophical with Children offer rich opportunities for wider critical reflection on epistemological and pedagogical questions for teacher education and continuing professional development. We illustrate the nature of this ongoing work through noticing and focusing on critical incidents drawn from our lived experience of PwC (...)
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  12.  11
    Not Now, Socrates, Part II.Karin Murris - 1994 - Cogito 8 (1):80-86.
  13.  13
    Can Children Do Philosophy?Karin Murris - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (2):261-279.
    Some philosophers claim that young children cannot do philosophy. This paper examines some of those claims, and puts forward arguments against them. Our beliefs that children cannot do philosophy are based on philosophical assumptions about children, their thinking and about philosophy. Many of those assumptions remain unquestioned by critics of Philosophy with Children. My conclusion is that the idea that very young children can do philosophy has not only significant consequences for how we should educate young children, but also for (...)
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  14.  24
    Not Now, Socrates ... , Part.Karin Murris - 1993 - Cogito 7 (3):236-243.
  15.  12
    Fifth International Conference on Philosophy in Practice.Gerd Achenbach, Eulalia Bosch, Eite Veening, Emmy Van Deurzen, Richard Smith, Ida Jongsma, Joanna Haynes, Dorine Baudin & Karin Murris - 1999 - History and Philosophy of Logic 20:77.
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  16.  7
    ‘Seeing’ with/in the World: Becoming-Little.Theresa Magdalen Giorza & Karin Murris - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:01-23.
    Critical posthumanism is an invitation to think differently about knowledge and educational relationality between humans and the more-than-human. This philosophical and political shift in subjectivity builds on, and is entangled with, poststructuralism and phenomenology. In this paper we read diffractively through one another the theories of Finnish architect Juhani Pallasmaa and feminist posthumanists Karen Barad and Rosi Braidotti. We explore the implications of the so-called ‘ontological turn’ for early childhood education. With its emphasis on a moving away from the dominant (...)
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  17.  9
    Right Under Our Noses: The Postponement of Children's Political Equality and the NOW.Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:01-21.
    Responding to the invitation of this special issue of Childhood and Philosophy this paper considers the ethos of facilitation in philosophical enquiry with children, and the spatial-temporal order of the community of enquiry. Within the Philosophy with Children movement, there are differences of thinking and practice on ‘facilitation’ in communities of philosophical enquiry, and we suggest that these have profound implications for the political agency of children. Facilitation can be enacted as a chronological practice of progress and development that works (...)
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  18.  4
    Taking Age Out of Play: Children's Animistic Philosophising Through a Picturebook.Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):290-309.
    This paper emerges from experiences of putting picturebooks, philosophy with children and posthumanism into play. Responding to Derrida's notion of a ‘return to childhood’, we propose a different move of ‘re-turning to child/ren’, drawing from various entangled sources. First, the figuration of posthuman child disrupts the conception of temporality that takes development and progress as inevitable. The posthuman child expresses the idea of the knowing subject as an unbounded sympoietic system. We put to work Miranda Fricker's notion of epistemic injustice (...)
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  19.  2
    Keeping the Question ‘What Comes After Postmodernism?’ Open.Karin Murris - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1600-1601.