Search results for '*Communication Skills' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sara Stubenrauch, Eva‐Maria Schneid, Alexander Wünsch, Almut Helmes, Hartmut Bertz, Kurt Fritzsche, Michael Wirsching & Tanja Gölz (2012). Development and Evaluation of a Checklist Assessing Communication Skills of Oncologists: The COM‐ON‐Checklist. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):225-230.score: 105.0
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  2. T. Hope & K. W. Fulford (1994). The Oxford Practice Skills Project: Teaching Ethics, Law and Communication Skills to Clinical Medical Students. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (4):229-234.score: 84.0
    We describe the teaching programme in ethics, law and communication skills for clinical medical students which is being developed as part of the Oxford Practice Skills Project. These three elements of practice are approached in an integrated teaching programme which aims to address everyday clinical practice. The role of a central value of patient-centred health care in guiding the teaching is described. Although the final aim of the teaching is to improve actual practice, we have found three 'sub-aims' (...)
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  3. Barry J. Sessle & Dongyuan Yao (2002). Contribution of Plasticity of Sensorimotor Cerebral Cortex to Development of Communication Skills. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):638-639.score: 84.0
    Several lines of evidence have underscored the remarkable neuroplasticity of the primate sensorimotor cortex, characterizing these cortical areas as dynamic constructs that are modelled in a use-dependent manner by behaviourally significant experiences. Their plasticity likely provides a neural substrate that may contribute to the dynamic systems paradigm argued by Shanker & King (S&K) as crucial for development of communication skills.
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  4. Ruth P. Chen (2011). Moral Imagination in Simulation-Based Communication Skills Training. Nursing Ethics 18 (1):102-111.score: 84.0
    Clinical simulation is used in nursing education and in other health professional programs to prepare students for future clinical practice. Simulation can be used to teach students communication skills and how to deliver bad news to patients and families. However, skilled communication in clinical practice requires students to move beyond simply learning superficial communication techniques and behaviors. This article presents an unexplored concept in the simulation literature: the exercise of moral imagination by the health professional student. Drawing from the (...)
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  5. David Cohen, M. F. Longo, Kerenza Hood, Adrian Edwards & Glyn Elwyn (2004). Resource Effects of Training General Practitioners in Risk Communication Skills and Shared Decision Making Competences. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):439-445.score: 71.0
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  6. Goran Bubas (2001). Toward Competence in Interpersonal Communication: Constitutive Traits, Skills and Dimensions. World Futures 57 (6):557-581.score: 68.0
    Both interpersonal and mass media communication is demanding for competence of communicators. The aim of this study was to determine the dimensions of interpersonal communicative competence. First, a total of 23 skills and traits were identified that are by various authors related to interpersonal communicative competence. Then, a research instrument named Interpersonal Communication Competence Inventory (ICCI) was developed for the measurement of those skills and traits. After evaluation of the ICCI scales, their total scores were factor analyzed in (...)
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  7. Frank V. Lefevre, Teresa M. Waters & Peter P. Budetti (2000). A Survey of Physician Training Programs in Risk Management and Communication Skills for Malpractice Prevention. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):258-266.score: 63.0
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  8. R. J. Marshall & A. Bleakley (2008). Putting It Bluntly: Communication Skills in the Iliad. Medical Humanities 34 (1):30-34.score: 63.0
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  9. Sarah Barclay (2010). Clinical Ethics Committee Case 12: Our Adolescent Patient has a Progressive Life-Limiting Condition and Impaired Communication Skills – How Should Decisions About Her Care Be Made? Clinical Ethics 5 (4):175-179.score: 63.0
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  10. Jochen W. L. Cals, Andre J. H. A. Ament, Kerenza Hood, Christopher C. Butler, Rogier M. Hopstaken, Geert F. Wassink & Geert‐Jan Dinant (2011). C‐Reactive Protein Point of Care Testing and Physician Communication Skills Training for Lower Respiratory Tract Infections in General Practice: Economic Evaluation of a Cluster Randomized Trial. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (6):1059-1069.score: 63.0
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  11. Valerie J. Grant (1995). Therapy of 'the Word': New Goals in Teaching Communication Skills. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (1):71-74.score: 63.0
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  12. M. G. Secundy (1993). Balancing Communication Skills and Clinical Assessment. Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (2):185.score: 63.0
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  13. Marcia Sue DeWolf Bosek (2002). Effective Communication Skills. Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 4 (4):93-97.score: 63.0
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  14. Francesco Garibaldo (2002). Information and Communication Technologies, Organisations and Skills: Convergence and Persistence. [REVIEW] AI and Society 16 (4):305-331.score: 56.0
    This article, first of all, supports the idea that the undeniable process of ICT-based technological convergence implies the social, cultural and business unification of the world of media and culture. The poor performance of the megamerger is a clear indicator of the unstable ground of the convergence hypothesis. Secondly, it argues in favour of cooperation between different expertise, skills and cultures to make multimedia products or to supply multimedia services, instead of creating from scratch a brand new class of (...)
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  15. Nabil Ibrahim & John Angelidis (2009). The Relative Importance of Ethics as a Selection Criterion for Entry-Level Public Accountants: Does Gender Make a Difference? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):49 - 58.score: 55.0
    This paper examines public accountants' perceptions of the relative importance of business ethics as a selection criterion for entry-level public accounting positions. Also, it seeks to determine whether gender differences do exist with respect to these perceptions. The data were collected through a survey of 335 professional accountants in four southeastern states. The results show that, among the eight selection factors that were studied, technical competence in accounting, communication skills, and interpersonal skills were the most influential, while professionalism (...)
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  16. Glyn Elwyn, Adrian Edwards, Michel Wensing, Richard Hibbs, Clare Wilkinson & Richard Grol (2001). Shared Decision Making Observed in Clinical Practice: Visual Displays of Communication Sequence and Patterns. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (2):211-221.score: 54.0
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  17. Vincent M. Janik (2013). Cognitive Skills in Bottlenose Dolphin Communication. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):157-159.score: 51.0
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  18. Laura Whelan (2001). What Writing Students Get From the Net: Using Synchronous Communication to Develop Writerly Skills. Kairos 6.score: 51.0
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  19. Cynthia D. Rittenhouse (1996). Survival Skills and Ethics Training for Graduate Students: A Graduate Student Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):367-380.score: 46.0
    Graduate students in the sciences must develop practical skills geared toward scientific survival and success. This is particularly true now, given the paucity of research funds and jobs. Along with more elementary skills, research ethics should be an integral part of students’ scientific training. Survival skills include research skills, communication skills, general efficiency, and preparation for post-graduate work. Ethics training covers guidelines for use of animal and human subjects, data treatment, disclosure, credit issues, conflicts of (...)
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  20. D. L. Spivak (2004). Linguistics of Altered States of Consciousness: Problems and Prospects. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics 11 (1):27-32.score: 42.0
  21. Inge Volman, Matthijs L. Noordzij & Ivan Toni (2012). Sources of Variability in Human Communicative Skills. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 40.0
    When established communication systems cannot be used, people rapidly create novel systems to modify the mental state of another agent according to their intentions. However, there are dramatic inter-individual differences in the implementation of this human competence for communicative innovation. Here we characterize psychological sources of inter-individual variability in the ability to build a shared communication system from scratch. We consider two potential sources of variability in communicative skills. Cognitive traits of two individuals could independently influence their joint ability (...)
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  22. Alexa Miller, Michelle Grohe, Shahram Khoshbin & Joel T. Katz (2013). From the Galleries to the Clinic: Applying Art Museum Lessons to Patient Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):433-438.score: 39.0
    Increasingly, medical educators integrate art-viewing into curricular interventions that teach clinical observation—often with local art museum educators. How can cross-disciplinary collaborators explicitly connect the skills learned in the art museum with those used at the bedside? One approach is for educators to align their pedagogical approach using similar teaching methods in the separate contexts of the galleries and the clinic. We describe two linked pedagogical exercises—Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) in the museum galleries and observation at the bedside—from “Training the (...)
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  23. Birgitta Dresp-Langley (2009). The Communication Contract and its ten Ground Clauses. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):415 - 436.score: 36.0
    Global society issues are putting increasing pressure on both small and large organizations to communicate ethically at all levels. Achieving this requires social skills beyond the choice of language or vocabulary and relies above all on individual social responsibility. Arguments from social contract philosophy and speech act theory lead to consider a communication contract that identifies the necessary individual skills for ethical communication on the basis of a limited number of explicit clauses. These latter are pragmatically binding for (...)
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  24. Miriam De Boer, Ivan Toni & Roel M. Willems (2013). What Drives Successful Verbal Communication? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 36.0
    There is a vast amount of potential mappings between behaviours and intentions in communication: a behaviour can indicate a multitude of different intentions, and the same intention can be communicated with a variety of behaviours. Humans routinely solve these many-to-many referential problems when producing utterances for an Addressee. This ability might rely on social cognitive skills, for instance, the ability to manipulate unobservable summary variables to disambiguate ambiguous behaviour of other agents (“mentalizing”) and the drive to invest resources into (...)
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  25. E. S. Savage‐Rumbaugh (1990). Language as a Cause‐Effect Communication System. Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):55-76.score: 32.0
    Abstract Christopher Gauker has argued that a cause?effect analysis of the acquisition of communication skills in chimpanzees is adequate to describe the data reported in our work at the Language Research Center. I agree that the cause?effect approach to language function is the only viable method of analyzing language. Language must be studied as a process that functions to organize behavior between two or more individuals. However, the problem of language understanding is not addressed satisfactorily by the perspective offered (...)
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  26. Elena María Muñoz Calvo, Mercedes Caridad García González, Luz Angélica Leyva Barceló & Kenia Ricardo Bencomo (2013). Communication barriers in the technologist-patient relationship within the professional context. Humanidades Médicas 13 (1):38-55.score: 32.0
    Introducción: la formación de profesionales competentes es una de las misiones esenciales de la Educación Médica Superior, esto exige que los tecnólogos posean habilidades comunicativas para un correcto desempeño laboral en aras del mejoramiento humano. Objetivo de la investigación: identificar las barreras que inciden en la comunicación tecnólogo - paciente en las carreras de Licenciatura en Traumatología, Podología, Terapia Física y Rehabilitación Social Ocupacional, en áreas de rehabilitación. Métodos: se presenta un estudio observacional, descriptivo longitudinal y retrospectivo entre junio de (...)
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  27. M. Nosek (2012). Nonviolent Communication: A Dialogical Retrieval of the Ethic of Authenticity. Nursing Ethics 19 (6):829-837.score: 32.0
    Charles Taylor called for a retrieval of the ethic of authenticity that has been distorted in modern notions of autonomy and self-fulfillment. Via exchanges with others who matter to us, he proposed that human identities develop through the use of rich language draped in shared horizons of significance. The fostering of these dialogical ties beyond purely instrumental purposes, along with the recognition of the human dignity in all, may avert the fallen ideal of authenticity. Nonviolent communication affords the skillful dialogue (...)
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  28. Matthew Allen (2004). Smart Thinking: Skills for Critical Understanding and Writing. Oxford University Press.score: 32.0
    Smart Thinking: Skills for Critical Understanding and Writing 2E is a practical step-by-step guide to improving skills in analysis, critical thinking, and the effective communication of arguments and explanations. The book combines an accessible and straightforward style, with a strong foundation of knowledge. The text treats reasoning as an aspect of communication, not an abstract exercise in logic. The book not only provides detailed advice on how to practise analytical skills, but also demonstrates how these skills (...)
     
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  29. Jerome E. Bickenbach & Jacqueline M. Davies (1996). Good Reasons for Better Arguments: An Introduction to the Skills and Values of Critical Thinking. Broadview Press.score: 32.0
    This text introduces university students to the philosophical ethos of critical thinking, as well as to the essential skills required to practice it. The authors believe that Critical Thinking should engage students with issues of broader philosophical interest while they develop their skills in reasoning and argumentation. The text is informed throughout by philosophical theory concerning argument and communication—from Aristotle's recognition of the importance of evaluating argument in terms of its purpose to Habermas's developing of the concept of (...)
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  30. Stuart G. Shanker & Barbara J. King (2002). The Emergence of a New Paradigm in Ape Language Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):605-620.score: 28.0
    In recent years we have seen a dramatic shift, in several different areas of communication studies, from an information-theoretic to a dynamic systems paradigm. In an information processing system, communication, whether between cells, mammals, apes, or humans, is said to occur when one organism encodes information into a signal that is transmitted to another organism that decodes the signal. In a dynamic system, all of the elements are continuously interacting with and changing in respect to one another, and an aggregate (...)
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  31. Michael A. Schwartz, Deaf Patients, Doctors, and the Law: Compelling a Conversation About Communication.score: 28.0
    Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) grants people with disabilities access to public accommodations, including the offices of medical providers, equal to that enjoyed by persons without disabilities. The Department of Justice (DOJ) has unequivocally declared that the law requires effective communication between the medical provider and the Deaf patient. Because most medical providers are not fluent in sign language, the DOJ has recognized that effective communication calls for the use of appropriate auxiliary aids, including sign language (...)
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  32. John R. Wilson (2003). Support of Opportunities for Shopfloor Involvement Through Information and Communication Technologies. AI and Society 17 (2):114-133.score: 28.0
    More companies are understanding the benefits of designing work to enhance, rather than minimise, the contributions of their employees within human-centred systems. To do this, they require their supportive subsystems (such as training, job, and team design, performance measurement and information) to provide people with the ability, motivation and opportunity to become increasingly involved. Opportunity for involvement will require different communication interfaces, providing data and background information both personally and at the work site or process. In the past few years, (...)
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  33. Annett Juras, Janine Brockmeier, Vera Niedergesaess & Dietrich Brandt (forthcoming). Trust and Team Development to Fight Chaos: Three Student Reports. AI and Society:1-9.score: 28.0
    The world is increasingly developing towards complex and chaotic behaviour. Enterprises are challenged to establish flexible but trustworthy structures of doing business within global instability. We need to educate our students today for coping with such chaotic patterns in their professional future. As an example, the student-run Europe-wide organisation ESTIEM is offering the 2-week Summer Academy (SAC) to develop the communication skills corresponding. It also means among other aims to strengthen mutual trust through interaction of the students. In 2011, (...)
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  34. Jan Engberg (2009). Individual Conceptual Structure and Legal Experts' Efficient Communication. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 22 (2):223-243.score: 28.0
    The article investigates characteristics of legal concepts as found in academic articles, focusing upon the knowledge base of legal experts. It is a cognitively oriented study of one of the semiotic basics of communication for academic legal purposes. The purpose is to study the structure of knowledge elements connected to the concept of “Criminal liability of corporations” from US law in and across individual experts in order to look for individual differences and similarities. The central concern is to investigate the (...)
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  35. Gloria Dall'Alba & Robyn Barnacle (2005). Embodied Knowing in Online Environments. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):719–744.score: 25.0
    In higher education, the conventional design of educational programs emphasises imparting knowledge and skills, in line with traditional Western epistemology. This emphasis is particularly evident in the design and implementation of many undergraduate programs in which bodies of knowledge and skills are decontextualised from the practices to which they belong. In contrast, the notion of knowledge as foundational and absolute has been extensively challenged. A transformation and pluralisation has occurred: knowledge has come to be seen as situated and (...)
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  36. Trevor H. J. Marchand (2008). Muscles, Morals and Mind: Craft Apprenticeship and the Formation of Person. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (3):245 - 271.score: 24.0
    The paper considers apprenticeship as a model of education that both teaches technical skills and provides the grounding for personal formation. The research presented is based on long-term anthropological fieldwork with minaret builders in Yemen, mud masons in Mali and fine-woodwork trainees in London. These case studies of on-site learning and practice support an expanded notion of knowledge that exceeds propositional thinking and language and centrally includes the body and skilled performance. Crafts -- like sport, dance and other skilled (...)
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  37. George J. Agich (2011). Defense Mechanisms in Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 23 (4):269-279.score: 24.0
    While there is no denying the relevance of ethical knowledge and analytical and cognitive skills in ethics consultation, such knowledge and skills can be overemphasized. They can be effectively put into practice only by an ethics consultant, who has a broad range of other skills, including interpretive and communicative capacities as well as the capacity effectively to address the psychosocial needs of patients, family members, and healthcare professionals in the context of an ethics consultation case. In this (...)
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  38. Miles Little (2014). Perhaps Medicine Is One of the Humanities? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):265-266.score: 24.0
    Why on earth should literary skills, or even a love of literature, make for a better doctor? Gribble (1992) has argued that encouraging literary critical skills sharpens those specific skills but has no benefits that flow into other cognitive areas. Nussbaum (1995), per contra, has claimed that literature does indeed allow imaginative participation in situations that are ethically challenging and therefore encourages the development of phronesis, or practical wisdom. Robin Downie (1994) taught an immensely popular course on (...)
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  39. Kathleen Miller (1995). A Feminist Defense of the Critical-Logical Model. Informal Logic 17 (3).score: 24.0
    In his (1994) "Feminism, Argumentation, and Coalescence", Michael Gilbert argues that the "Critical Thinking Industry" is antagonistic to women. Because the critical-logical skills in which the industry deals tend to be gender-specific. its adoption as the dominant mode of discourse disenfranchises women, making its overhaul a moral imperative. Following a variety offeminist epistemologists. this conclusion is reached by confiating "critical reasoning" with "communicating about ideas," as though the two were inseparable. In this paper it is argued that the inclusion (...)
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  40. David S. Miall & Ellen Dissanayake (2003). The Poetics of Babytalk. Human Nature 14 (4):337-364.score: 24.0
    Caretaker-infant attachment is a complex but well-recognized adaptation in humans. An early instance of (or precursor to) attachment behavior is the dyadic interaction between adults and infants of 6 to 24 weeks, commonly called "babytalk." Detailed analysis of 1 minute of spontaneous babytalk with an 8-week infant shows that the poetic texture of the mother’s speech—specifically its use of metrics, phonetics, and foregrounding—helps to shape and direct the baby’s attention, as it also coordinates the partners’ emotional communication. We hypothesize that (...)
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  41. Sarah L. Berry & Anthony Cerulli (2013). Mad Scientists, Narrative, and Social Power: A Collaborative Learning Activity. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):451-454.score: 24.0
    Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short stories “The Birthmark” (1843) and “Rappaccini’s Daughter” (1844) encourage critical thinking about science and scientific research as forms of social power. In this collaborative activity, students work in small groups to discuss the ways in which these stories address questions of human experimentation, gender, manipulation of bodies, and the role of narrative in mediating perceptions about bodies. Students collectively adduce textual evidence from the stories to construct claims and present a mini-argument to the class, thereby strengthening their (...)
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  42. A. Bleakley & R. J. Marshall (2012). The Embodiment of Lyricism in Medicine and Homer. Medical Humanities 38 (1):50-54.score: 20.0
    Improving the quality of communication between doctors and their patients and colleagues is of vital importance. Poor communication, especially within and across clinical teams working around patients in pathways of care, leads to avoidable medical error, where an unacceptable number of patients are severely harmed or die each year. The figures from such iatrogenesis have now reached epidemic proportions, constituting one of the major killers of patients worldwide. Despite 30 years' worth of explicit attention to teaching communication skills at (...)
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  43. Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2005). What Chimpanzees Know About Seeing, Revisited: An Explanation of the Third Kind. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. 45--64.score: 20.0
    Chimpanzees follow the gaze of conspecifics and humans — follow it past distractors and behind barriers, ‘check back’ with humans when gaze following does not yield interesting sights, use gestures appropriately depending on the visual access of their recipient, and select different pieces of food depending on whether their competitor has visual access to them. Taken together, these findings make a strong case for the hypothesis that chimpanzees have some understanding of what other individuals can and cannot see. However, chimpanzees (...)
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  44. D. Darbyshire & P. Baker (2012). A Systematic Review and Thematic Analysis of Cinema in Medical Education. Medical Humanities 38 (1):28-33.score: 20.0
    The use of cinema in medical education has the potential to teach students about a variety of subjects, for instance by illustrating a lecture on communication skills with a clip of Sir Lancelot Spratt (Doctor In The House, 1954) demonstrating a paternalistic, doctor-centred approach to medicine or nurturing an ethical discussion around palliative care and dying using the cinematic adaptation of American playwright Margaret Edson's Wit (2001). Much has been written about this teaching method across several medical academic disciplines. (...)
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  45. L. -C. Huang, C. -H. Chen, H. -L. Liu, H. -Y. Lee, N. -H. Peng, T. -M. Wang & Y. -C. Chang (2013). The Attitudes of Neonatal Professionals Towards End-of-Life Decision-Making for Dying Infants in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):382-386.score: 20.0
    The purposes of research were to describe the neonatal clinicians' personal views and attitudes on neonatal ethical decision-making, to identify factors that might affect these attitudes and to compare the attitudes between neonatal physicians and neonatal nurses in Taiwan. Research was a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire was used to reach different research purposes. A convenient sample was used to recruit 24 physicians and 80 neonatal nurses from four neonatal intensive care units in Taiwan. Most participants agreed with suggesting a (...)
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  46. R. Marshall & A. Bleakley (2009). The Death of Hector: Pity in Homer, Empathy in Medical Education. Medical Humanities 35 (1):7-12.score: 20.0
    Empathy is thought a desirable quality in doctors as a key component of communication skills and professionalism. It is therefore thought desirable to teach it to medical students. Yet empathy is a quality whose essence is difficult to capture but easy to enact. We problematise empathy in an era where empathy has been literalised and instrumentalised, including its measurement. Even if we could agree a universally acceptable definition of empathy, engendering it in the student requires a more subtle approach (...)
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  47. Susan Dorr Goold & David T. Stern (2006). Ethics and Professionalism: What Does a Resident Need to Learn? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):9 – 17.score: 20.0
    Training in ethics and professionalism is a fundamental component of residency education, yet there is little empirical information to guide curricula. The objective of this study is to describe empirically derived ethics objectives for ethics and professionalism training for multiple specialties. Study design is a thematic analysis of documents, semi-structured interviews, and focus groups conducted in a setting of an academic medical center, Veterans Administration, and community hospital training more than 1000 residents. Participants were 84 informants in 13 specialties including (...)
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  48. R. M. James & A. N. Williams (2008). Two Georgian Fathers: Diverse in Experience, United in Grief. Medical Humanities 34 (2):70-79.score: 20.0
    The history of paediatrics and child health is increasingly recognised to be about children themselves and how they and their families cope and adapt to their medical condition rather than about medical practitioners and august institutions. This article considers two case studies, showing how two Georgian fathers cared for their children when sickness struck and their reactions when the children died. Davies (Giddy) Gilbert, FRS (1767–1840), was a member of Parliament first for Helston and later for Bodmin. (He married Ann (...)
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  49. Mark Holden, Era Buck, Mark Clark, Karen Szauter & Julie Trumble (2012). Professional Identity Formation in Medical Education: The Convergence of Multiple Domains. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):245-255.score: 20.0
    There has been increasing emphasis on professionalism in medical education over the past several decades, initially focusing on bioethical principles, communication skills, and behaviors of medical students and practitioners. Authors have begun to discuss professional identity formation (PIF), distinguishing it as the foundational process one experiences during the transformation from lay person to physician. This integrative developmental process involves the establishment of core values, moral principles, and self-awareness. The literature has approached PIF from various paradigms—professionalism, psychological ego development, social (...)
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  50. Tomasz R. Okon (2006). "Nobody Understands": On a Cardinal Phenomenon of Palliative Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (1):13 – 46.score: 20.0
    In the clinical practice of palliative medicine, recommended communication models fail to approximate the truth of suffering associated with an impending death. I provide evidence from patients' stories and empiric research alike to support this observation. Rather than attributing this deficiency to inadequate training or communication skills, I examine the epistemological premises of the biomedical language governing the patient-physician communication. I demonstrate that the contemporary biomedicine faces a fundamental aporetic occlusion in attempting to examine death. This review asserts that (...)
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