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C. Delkeskamp-Hayes [18]Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes [11]
  1. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2013). Introduction. Christian Bioethics 19 (2):115-129.
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  2. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes & Tibor Imrényi (2013). Claims, Priorities, and Moral Excuses: A Culture's Dependence on Abortion and Its Cure. Christian Bioethics 19 (2):198-241.
    One of the lamentable characteristics of our contemporary age is the way in which abortion has been adopted as a natural part of the culture. This essay describes this adoption as a symptom of that culture’s profound de-Christianization. As that culture sheds its once Christian commitments, persons change the way in which they relate to their body in its sexually differentiated physiology, its physical drives and impulses. They refashion their sense of human flourishing, their vision of women’s social role, the (...)
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  3. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2012). Rethinking the Christian Bioethics of Human Germ Line Genetic Engineering: A Postscript Against the Grain of Contemporary Distortions. Christian Bioethics 18 (2):219-230.
    Unlike (especially) the various Protestantisms, Orthodox Christianity recognizes no fundamentally different problems in the development and (future) application of human germ line genetic engineering (HGGE) than those raised by more traditional medicine. The particular challenges which frame the life of a traditional Christian arise not only in view of “groundbreaking” technological progress and its attendant increase in human power over nature, but permeate already his most simple daily routines. The diverse post-traditional Christianities have ceased confronting such liturgical–ascetical challenges. The quite (...)
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  4. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2011). Resolving Family Disagreements in Biomedical Decision Making: The Spiritual Source of Paternal Authority. Christian Bioethics 17 (3):206-226.
    Paternal authority is recommended as a valid Christian resource for conflict resolution in biomedical (and other inner-familial) decision making. Its bases are explored in view of the two-fold creation account in Genesis, interpreted in the light of the Pauline theology. In addition, a theological account is proposed that portrays the taxis between husband and wife as a condition under which humans can seek to emulate the inner-Trinitarian love. The relationship between that love (as portrayed in St. Basil’s On the Holy (...)
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  5. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2010). Psychologically Informed Pastoral Care: How Serious Can It Get About God? Orthodox Reflections on Christian Counseling in Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 16 (1):79-116.
    This essay takes a Traditional Christian, that is, Orthodox look at the integration of psychotherapy into pastoral counseling, as endorsed by many Western mainline Christianities. It examines how the Christian pastor can guide his sheep through the bioethical problems they encounter in their pursuit of salvation. The first part explores whether the turn to psychology and psychotherapy can be welcomed as a return to the Traditional therapeutic understanding of theology and of the Church as a spiritual hospital for fallen souls. (...)
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  6. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2010). Pastoral Versus Psychological Counseling in Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 16 (1):1-8.
    This introduction discusses the various respects in which the turn to psychotherapy and psychology in pastoral counseling touches on issues of bioethics (as the content of such counseling) and medical morality (insofar as the spiritual dimension addressed in pastoral care impacts the medical condition of those cared for, and the various kinds of psychotherapy relate to the therapy offered by medicine). A short characterization of each essay contained in this issue of Christian Bioethics highlights the major subjects on which these (...)
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  7. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2009). Diakonia II: Caretaking in the Medical Realm and its Political Implementation. Christian Bioethics 15 (2):101-106.
    This introduction to Christian Bioethics 15/2 focuses on the challenges which secular moral reconstruction and secular political implementation presents for Christian diakonia. It summarises the various Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox ways in which Christians’ loving service to the world have been integrated either into the secular state's provision of social welfare or into the Church's liturgical life by the authors of this issue. This summary centres on questions concerning the political nature of Christian charity, its role within the church, (...)
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  8. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2009). Diakonia, the State, and Ecumenical Collaboration: Theological Pitfalls. Christian Bioethics 15 (2):173-198.
    This essay questions the way in which continental Western Christians welcome political implementation (i.e., integration into the publicly funded welfare network and collaboration with heterodox Christians, members of other religions, or irreligious humanitarians) when offering their diaconic services. Among the theological assumptions underlying such reliance from outside the Church, this essay takes special issue with the idea that Christianity's “ethical” commitment to charity can be separated from its spiritual (e.g., liturgical, ascetical, missionary) concerns. Such separation suggests prioritizing charity recipients’ needs (...)
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  9. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2009). European Bioethics II--Disparate Hopes and Fears: An Introduction. Christian Bioethics 15 (1):1-16.
    This introduction supplies further bearing points for the conceptual map, which the introduction to the previous issue on European bioethics (2008/1) had provided for sorting out the various dimension in which the essays collected in these issues resemble and differ from each other. Special attention is devoted to communication, as diverse Christianities attend to different purposes, problems, and opportunities for normatively engaging (persuading, influencing, ruling, opposing, and converting) their surrounding secularized cultures. These differences reflect incompatible ways of conceiving Christ's acts (...)
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  10. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2008). Is Europe, Along with its Bioethics, Still Christian? Or Already Post-Christian? Reflections on Traditional and Post-Enlightenment Christianities and Their Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 14 (1):1-28.
    This introduction explores the relationship between Europe and its Christianities. It analyses different diagnostic and evaluative approaches to Europe's Christian or post-Christian identity. These are grouped around the concepts of diverse traditional, and, on the other hand, post-Enlightenment Christianities. While the first revolves around a liturgical and mystical account of the church, a Christ-centred humanism, an emphasis on man's future life, noetic theology and a foundationalist claim to universal truth, the second endorses a moralization of the “Christian message,” political implementation (...)
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  11. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2007). Resisting the Therapeutic Reduction: On The Significance of Sin. Christian Bioethics 13 (1):105-127.
    Sin-talk, though politically incorrect, is indispensable. Placing human life under the ‘hermeneutic of sin’ means acknowledging that one ought to aim flawlessly at God, and that one can fail in this endeavor. None of this can be appreciated within the contemporary post-Christian, mindset, which has attempted to reduce religion to morality and culture. In such a secular context, the guilt-feelings connected with the recognition of sin are considered to be harmful; the eternal benefit of a repentance is disregarded. Nevertheless, spirituality (...)
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  12. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2007). Sin and Disease in a Post-Christian Culture: An Introduction. Christian Bioethics 13 (1):1-5.
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  13. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2006). Sin and Disease: An Introduction. Christian Bioethics 12 (2):107-115.
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  14. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2006). Why Patients Should Give Thanks for Their Disease: Traditional Christianity on the Joy of Suffering. Christian Bioethics 12 (2):213-228.
    Patristic teaching about sin and disease allows supplementing well-acknowledged conditions for a Christian medicine with further personal challenges, widely disregarded in Western Christianities. A proper appreciation of man's vocation toward (not just achieving forgiveness but) deification reveals the need to cooperate with the Holy Spirit's offer of grace toward restoring man's prefallen nature. Ascetical exercises designed at re-establishing the spirit's mastery over the soul distance persons from (even supposedly harmless) passion. They thus inspire the struggle towards emulating Christ's (self-crucifying) kenotic (...)
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  15. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2006). Freedom-Costs of Canonical Individualism: Enforced Euthanasia Tolerance in Belgium and the Problem of European Liberalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4):333 – 362.
    Belgium's policy of not permitting Catholic hospitals to refuse euthanasia services rests on ethical presuppositions concerning the secular justification of political power which reveal the paradoxical character of European liberalism: In endorsing freedom as a value (rather than as a side constraint), liberalism prioritizes first-order intentions, thus discouraging lasting moral commitments and the authority of moral communities in supporting such commitments. The state itself is thus transformed into a moral community of its own. Alternative policies (such as an explicit moral (...)
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  16. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2006). Implementing Health Care Rights Versus Imposing Health Care Cultures: The Limits of Tolerance, Kant's Rationality, and the Moral Pitfalls of International Bioethics Standardization,'. In H. Tristram Engelhardt (ed.), Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus. M & M Scrivener Press. 50--94.
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  17. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2005). Between Morality and Repentance: Recapturing “Sin” for Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 11 (2):93-132.
    (2005). Between Morality and Repentance: Recapturing “Sin” for Bioethics. Christian Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 93-132.
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  18. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2003). Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide, and Christianity's Positive Relationship to the World. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):163-185.
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  19. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2003). Generic Versus Catholic Hospital Chaplaincy: The Diversity of Spirits as a Problem of Inter-Faith Cooperation. Christian Bioethics 9 (1):3-21.
    Hospital chaplaincy, in its exposure to clients, colleagues, and care-takers from different faith backgrounds, can be understood in either generic or catholic terms. The first understanding, often merely implicit in denominationalist approaches, assumes that some “Absolute” can be prayerfully invoked through the medium of diverse rituals, confessions, and symbols. This position combines the advantage of unprejudiced acceptance of other creeds and traditions with the disadvantage of lacking resources for discriminating among the spiritualities that may be operative within those other creeds (...)
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  20. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2003). The Price of Being Conciliatory: Remarks About Mellon's Model for Hospital Chaplaincy Work in Multi-Faith Settings. Christian Bioethics 9 (1):69-78.
    The intimate connection, within Christianity, of theology and ethics is invoked, and the ethical differences between Christian denominations are exposed, as they present themselves inMellon's case studies, in order to call attention to the unsolvable dilemma in which hospital chaplains find themselves, if they understand their role in a merely conciliatory fashion as that of a “comforter, mediator, educator, ethicist, and counselor”. As witnessed by the Calvinist and Anabaptist traditions Mellon introduces, concepts such as “the patient's good” can mean radically (...)
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  21. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2003). The Spiritual Claim of a Dying Mother - A Complement to Paul's Report. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):337-341.
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  22. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2002). Bioethics for Thresholders: A Brief Introduction. Christian Bioethics 8 (3):275-282.
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  23. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2002). Global Biomedicine, Human Dignity, and the Moral Justification of Political Power. In. In Julia Lai Po-Wah Tao (ed.), Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the (Im) Possibility of Global Bioethics. Kluwer Academic Pub.. 149--177.
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  24. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (2001). Christian Credentials for Roman Catholic Health Care: Medicine Versus the Healing Mission of the Church. Christian Bioethics 7 (1):117-150.
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  25. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2000). Respecting, Protecting, Persons, Humans, and Conceptual Muddles in the Bioethics Convention. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):147 – 180.
    The Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine confuses respect for a person's right to self-determination with concern about protecting human beings generally. In a legal document, this mixture of deontological with utilitarian considerations undermines what it should preserve: respect for human dignity as the foundation of modern rights-based democracies. Falling prey to the ambiguity of freedom, the Convention blurs the dividing line between morality and the law. The document should be remedied through distinguishing fundamental rights from social 'rights', persons as (...)
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  26. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (1998). A Christian for the Christians, a Christian for the Muslims! An Attempt at an Argumentum Ad Hominem. Christian Bioethics 4 (3):284-304.
    Schmidt and Egler's critique of Christianity's exclusivist claim to truth rests on two suppositions: (a) that inter-religious pastoral care for dying patients requires a respect for their cultural backgrounds which necessitates accepting the equal validity of their respective (non-Christian) religions, and (b) that exclusivism is incompatible with the Christian love-of-neighbor commandment. In opposition to this critique, (a) the authors' own “pluralist” understanding of Christianity is refuted on two levels. First, it leads to inconsistencies in the authors' own (and very adequate) (...)
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  27. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (1996). Equal Access to Health Care: A Lutheran Lay Person's Expanded Footnote. Christian Bioethics 2 (3):326-345.
    Can proposing a policy of equal access to health care be justified on Christian grounds? The notion of a “Christian justification” with regard to Christians' political activity is explored in relation to the New Testament texts. The less demanding policy of granting “rights to (basic) health care,” the meaning of Jesus' healing activities, early Christian welfare schemes, and Christian grounds for the ascription of “rights” are each discussed. As a result, with some stretching of the neighbor-love and missionary imperatives it (...)
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  28. C. Delkeskamp-Hayes (1995). Towards a Non-Ecumenical Interchange: Engelhardt, Hauerwas, and Ramsey on Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (1):48-64.
    Does a non-ecumenical journal on Christian bioethics make sense? Taking issue with Stanley Hauerwas' critique of Ramsey, the author argues (l) interdenominational exchange should not be construed as contest, and (2) the attempt on the part of Christians to address secular issues in secular terms should not be mistrusted or viewed as a contamination hazard. Instead (I) an awareness of human limits should render adherents of different traditions willing to learn from each other and (2) one should see in the (...)
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  29. Loretta Kopelman, Frank H. Marsh, Laurence B. McCullough, Cheshire Calhoun, Manfred Gessler, Guenter B. Risse, Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes & Christian Probst (1983). Reviews. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (3).
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