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  1.  12
    Proclus and His Legacy.Danielle A. Layne & David Butorac (eds.) - 2016 - Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter.
    his volume investigates Proclus' own thought and his wide-ranging influence within late Neoplatonic, Alexandrine and Byzantinian philosophy and theology. It further explores how Procline metaphysics and doctrines of causality influence and transition into Arabic and Islamic thought, up until Richard Hooker in England, Spinoza in Holland and Pico in Italy. John Dillon provides a helpful overview of Proclus' thought, Harold Tarrant discusses Proclus' influence within Alexandrian philosophy and Tzvi Langermann presents ground breaking work on the Jewish reception of Proclus, focusing (...)
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  2.  13
    The Neoplatonic Socrates.Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.) - 2014 - University of Pennsylvania Press.
    In The Neoplatonic Socrates, leading scholars in classics and philosophy address this gap by examining Neoplatonic attitudes toward the Socratic method, Socratic love, Socrates's divine mission and moral example, and the much-debated issue of moral rectitude. Collectively, they demonstrate the importance of Socrates for the majority of Neoplatonists, a point that has often been questioned owing to the comparative neglect of surviving commentaries on the Alcibiades, Gorgias, Phaedo, and Phaedrus, in favor of dialogues dealing explicitly with metaphysical issues. Supplemented with (...)
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  3.  6
    Introduction.Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne - 2014 - In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 1-20.
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  4.  47
    In Praise of the Mere Presence of Ignorance.Danielle A. Layne - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:253-267.
    With regard to the theme “Reason in context,” the following stimulates a discussion on both Plato’s Socrates and the culpability of ignorance. By focusingon Plato’s Lysis, Alcibiades I, Philebus, and the Laws, I debunk the typical interpretation of Socratic moral intellectualism by evidencing that though there are various forms of ignorance in the Platonic dialogues, only one leads to shame-worthy error. Furthermore, in this endeavour to understand the “hierarchy” of ignorance in Plato, I take an unusual path and jump from (...)
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  5.  43
    Refutation and Double Ignorance in Proclus.Danielle A. Layne - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):347-362.
    Regardless of the inconsistencies between Plato and his inheritors, the late neo-Platonist Proclus offers poignant answers to several contemporary debatesimbedded in Socratic scholarship. In the following, we will concentrate on Proclus’s interpretation of the Socratic elenchos and the provocative concept of double ignorance by clarifying their appearance in The Commentary on Plato’s Parmenides and The Commentary on the Alcibiades I. In this endeavor we shall unpack how Proclus characterizes the elenchos as an authentic dialectic purifying its recipients from an evil (...)
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  6.  8
    Plato and the Body: Reconsidering Socratic Asceticism by Coleen P. Zoller.Danielle A. Layne - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):550-551.
    According to a widespread understanding among historians of philosophy, there is within the dialogues of Plato an underlying metaphysical dualism, one that devalues the body and the natural world, promoting, ultimately, an unattractive and repressive asceticism. An obvious support for this “standard” reading is provided by the Phaedo, wherein the soul is depicted as a prisoner in a cage ; but, as many readers would eagerly point out, most of Plato’s dialogues offer robust metaphors, images, or arguments that continuously suggest (...)
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  7.  18
    Hypatia: The Life and Legend of an Ancient Philosopher_ _, Written by E. Watts.Danielle A. Layne - 2017 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 11 (2):230-233.
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  8.  25
    Philosophical Prayer in Proclus’s Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus.Danielle A. Layne - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (2):345-368.
    In response to Timaeus’ invocation of the gods at Timaeus 27c1-d4, Proclus discusses, in his commentary on the text, the value of prayer. Heralding the fact that prayer marks the soul’s epistrophe or return to its causative principle, Proclus proceeds to exonerate those who invoke and pray to the gods, arguing that prayer enacts the emergence of human freedom in the determined world. He argues that since the gods are not only our superior causes but also the ones who have (...)
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  9.  5
    The Value of the Present Moment in Neoplatonic Philosophy.Danielle A. Layne - 2019 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):445-460.
    In the spirit of Pierre Hadot’s analysis of the value of the present moment in Hellenistic philosophies on happiness, the following argues that the Neoplatonic tradition heralded a similar view about the soul’s well-being. Primarily, the value of the present moment in Plotinus focuses on his arguments regarding the immortal soul’s desire for eternity that is lived in the ‘actuality of life’ right now. In contrast, the following analyzes the later Platonists and argues that Proclus offers a more practical and (...)
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  10.  17
    Involuntary Evil and the Socratic Problem of Double Ignorance in Proclus.Danielle A. Layne - 2015 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 9 (1):27-53.
    In hisCommentary on the AlcibiadesiProclus often discusses and links the peculiar epistemological category of “double ignorance” with evil and grievous error. To understand this more fully, the following analyzes Proclus’ concept of double ignorance, its characteristics and its causes. Markedly, due to his understanding of double ignorance, Proclus offers a response to the “Socratic” idea that no one willingly errs as this particular category of not-knowing enables him to explain how individuals, despite desiring and in some sense knowing the good, (...)
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  11.  7
    E. Watts.Danielle A. Layne - forthcoming - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition.
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  12.  13
    Chapter 5. The Character of Socrates and the Good of Dialogue Form: Neoplatonic Hermeneutics.Danielle A. Layne - 2014 - In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 80-96.
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  13.  9
    Conclusion.Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne - 2014 - In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 163-166.
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  14.  6
    In Praise of the Mere Presence of Ignorance.Danielle A. Layne - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:253-267.
    With regard to the theme “Reason in context,” the following stimulates a discussion on both Plato’s Socrates and the culpability of ignorance. By focusingon Plato’s Lysis, Alcibiades I, Philebus, and the Laws, I debunk the typical interpretation of Socratic moral intellectualism by evidencing that though there are various forms of ignorance in the Platonic dialogues, only one leads to shame-worthy error. Furthermore, in this endeavour to understand the “hierarchy” of ignorance in Plato, I take an unusual path and jump from (...)
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  15. Platonic Pathways: Selected Papers From the Fourteenth Annual Conference of the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies.John F. Finamore & Danielle A. Layne (eds.) - 2018 - The Prometheus Trust.
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  16. Socratic Ignorance and Platonic Knowledge in the Dialogues of Plato, Written by Sara Ahbel-Rappe.Danielle A. Layne - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):412-414.
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  17. Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity.Harold Tarrant, Danielle A. Layne, Dirk Baltzly & François Renaud (eds.) - 2017 - Leiden: Brill.