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Jane Geaney [14]Jane M. Geaney [5]
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Jane Geaney
University of Richmond
  1.  14
    Mencius and Early Chinese Thought.Jane M. Geaney & Kwon-loi Shun - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (2):366.
  2. On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought.Jane Geaney - 2002
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  3. Guarding Moral Boundaries: Shame in Early Confucianism.Jane Geaney - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (2):113-142.
    : In response to allegations that China is a "shame culture," scholars of Confucian ethics have made use of new studies in psychology, anthropology, and philosophy that present shame in a more favorable light. These studies contend that shame involves internalization of social moral codes. By adapting these new internal models of shame, Confucian ethicists have attempted to rehabilitate the emphasis on shame in early Confucianism, but in doing so they have inadvertently highlighted the striking absence in early Confucian texts (...)
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  4.  10
    Sharing the Light: Representations of Women and Virtue in Early China.Jane M. Geaney & Lisa Raphals - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (1):140.
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  5.  7
    The Way of Water and Sprouts of Virtue.Jane M. Geaney & Sarah Allan - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (2):304.
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  6. Self as Container? Metaphors We Lose By in Understanding Early China.Jane Geaney - 2011 - Antiquorum Philosophia 5:11-30.
    As part of a trend in modern cognitive science, cognitive linguist, George Lakoff, and philosopher, Mark Johnson claim to provide a biologically-based account of subsymbolic meaningful experiences. They argue that human beings understand objects by extrapolating from their sensory motor activities and primary perceptions. Lakoff and Johnson’s writings have generated a good deal of interest among scholars of Early China because they maintain that “our common embodiment allows for common stable truths.” Although there are many grounds on which Lakoff and (...)
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  7.  32
    A Critique of A. C. Graham's Reconstruction of the "Neo-Mohist Canons".Jane M. Geaney - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (1):1.
    A. C. Graham's Later Mohist Logic, Ethics, and Sciences is the only Western-language translation of the obscure and textually corrupt chapters of the Mozi that purportedly constitute the foundations of ancient Chinese logic. Graham's presentation and interpretation of this difficult material has been largely accepted by scholars. This article questions the soundness of Graham's reconstruction of these chapters . Upon close examination, problems are revealed in both the structure and the content of the framework Graham uses to interpret the Canons. (...)
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  8.  45
    Grounding "Language" in the Senses: What the Eyes and Ears Reveal About Ming 名 (Names) in Early Chinese Texts.Jane Geaney - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (2):pp. 251-293.
    For understanding early Chinese "theories of language" and views about the relation of speech to a nonalphabetic script, a thorough analysis of early Chinese metalinguistic terminology is necessary. This article analyzes the function of ming & (name) in early Chinese texts as a first step in that direction. It argues against the regular treatment of this term in early Chinese texts as the equivalent of "word." It examines ming in light of early Chinese ideas about sense perception, the mythology about (...)
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  9.  5
    Methods of the Way: Early Chinese Ethical Thought.Jane M. Geaney & Rune Svarverud - 2003 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 123 (2):409.
  10. Associate Professor of Religion.Jane Geaney - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 19 (1):1-11.
    A. C. Graham's Later Mohist Logic, Ethics, and Sciences (1978) is the only Western-language translation of the obscure and textually corrupt chapters of the Mozi that purportedly constitute the foundations of ancient Chinese logic. Graham's presentation and interpretation of this difficult material has been largely accepted by scholars. This article questions the soundness of Graham's reconstruction of these chapters (the so-called "Neo-Mohist Canons"). Upon close examination, problems are revealed in both the structure and the content of the framework Graham uses (...)
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  11. Book Review. [REVIEW]Jane Geaney - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (2):304-305.
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  12.  4
    Chinese Cosmology and Recent Studies in Confucian Ethics: A Review Essay.Jane Geaney - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):451-470.
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  13. Language and Sense Discrimination in Ancient China.Jane Geaney - 1996 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    The dissertation examines the intersection of language and sense discrimination in the texts of classical Chinese philosophy . Through an analysis of the figures of speech related to language and sense discrimination, it argues that the pair 'aural and visual' forms a significant dualism within the Chinese cosmos. ;The significance of the aural/visual dualism is threefold. First, it clarifies classical Chinese epistemology. The dissertation argues that classical Chinese epistemology is a matter of matching many levels of parallels between the aural (...)
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  14.  7
    Movement and Ming (Names): A Response to “Incongruent Names: A Theme in the History of Chinese Philosophy”.Jane Geaney - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (4):635-644.
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  15.  36
    Chinese Cosmology and Recent Studies in Confucian Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW]Jane Geaney - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):449 - 470.
    Scholars of early Chinese philosophy frequently point to the nontranscendent, organismic conception of the cosmos in early China as the source of China's unique perspective and distinctive values. One would expect recent works in Confucian ethics to capitalize on this idea. Reviewing recent works in Confucian ethics by P. J. Ivanhoe, David Nivison, R. P. Peerenboom, Henry Rosemont, and Tu Wei-Ming, the author analyzes these new studies in terms of the extent to which their representation of Confucian ethics reflects and (...)
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  16.  22
    Mencius’s Hermeneutics.Jane Geaney - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (1):93-100.