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769 found
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1 — 50 / 769
  1. Do Confucians Really Care?Yujin Nagasawa - manuscript
    (accepted for publication before I began my graduate studies at Oxford; Hypatia, 2002).
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  2. Ŭirye Munhae. Ŭirye Munhae Sŭbyu.Chang-Saeng Kim - unknown - Minjok Munhwa.
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  3. Karye Chiphae.Mong-sam Sin - unknown - Minjok Munhwa.
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  4. Sŏngho Sŏnsaeng Karye Chilsŏ. Sŏngho Yesik. Ŭrye Yusŏl.Ik Yi - unknown - Minjok Munhwa.
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  5. Sŏngho Sŏnsaeng Karye Chilsŏ.Ik Yi - unknown - Minjok Munhwa.
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  6. Karye Chŭnghae.Ŭi-jo Yi - unknown - Minjok Munhwa.
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  7. Karye Wŏllyu.Kye Yu - unknown - Minjok Munhwa.
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  8. Karye Wŏllyu.Sŏn-gŏ Yun - unknown - Minjok Munhwa.
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  9. Does a Politician Need Paideia? The Contextualized Vantage of (Neo) Confucian and Platonic Ethics.M. Benetatou - forthcoming - Philosophy of Education.
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  10. African and East Asian Perspectives on Ageing.Thaddeus Metz - forthcoming - In Christopher Wareham (ed.), Cambridge Handbook of the Ethics of Ageing. Cambridge University Press.
    After expounding the conceptions of harmony that are central to Confucianism and the sub-Saharan ethic of ubuntu, I apply them to three major topics pertaining to age, namely, virtue, the value of life, and care. Roughly speaking, indigenous East Asian and African values of harmony both entail that only the elderly can be truly virtuous, that the elderly have a strong claim to life-saving resources, and that they are entitled to care from their children, views that I show are not (...)
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  11. “Human Drugs” in Chinese Medicine and the Confucian View: An Interpretive Study.Jing-Bao Nie - forthcoming - Confucian Bioethics.
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  12. The Dao of Ethics* The Writings ofIevinas to The DaoDeJingl J J.A. T. Nuyen - forthcoming - Journal of Chinese Philosophy.
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  13. Grounding Confucian Moral Psychology in Rasa Theory: A Commentary on Shun Kwong-Loi’s “Anger, Compassion, and the Distinction Between First and Third-Person.”.Lee Wilson - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1).
    Shun Kwong-loi argues that the distinction between first- and third-person points of view does not play as explanatory a role in our moral psychology as has been supposed by contemporary philosophical discussions. He draws insightfully from the Confucian tradition to better elucidate our everyday experiences of moral emotions, arguing that it offers an alternative and more faithful perspective on our experiences of anger and compassion. However, unlike the distinction between first- and third-person points of view, Shun’s descriptions of anger and (...)
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  14. Daoism, Humanity, and the Way of Heaven.Ian James Kidd - 2020 - Religious Studies 56:111-126.
    I argue that Zhuangist Daoism manifests what I label the spiritual aspiration to emulation, and then use this to challenge some of John Cottingham's attempts to confine authentic spiritual experience to theistic traditions.
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  15. Communication Strategies in the Light of Indigenous African and Chinese Values: How to Harmonize (Repr.).Thaddeus Metz - 2020 - In Paul Tembe & Vusi Gumede (eds.), Culture, Identities and Ideologies in Africa-China Cooperation. Africa World Press.
    Reprint of an article first appearing in Philosophia Africana (2020).
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  16. Communication Strategies in the Light of Indigenous African and Chinese Values: How to Harmonize.Thaddeus Metz - 2020 - Philosophia Africana 19 (2):176-194.
    Many values originating in Africa and in China, and ones that continue to influence much of everyday communication in those societies, are aptly placed under the common heading of 'harmony'. After first spelling out what harmony involves in substantially Confucian China, and then in Africa, this article notes respects in which the Confucian and African conceptions of harmony are similar, an awareness of which could facilitate smooth communication. The article then indicates respects in which the Confucian and African conceptions of (...)
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  17. Shared Ends: Kant and Dai Zhen on the Ethical Value of Mutually Fulfilling Relationships.Justin Tiwald - 2020 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 33:105-137.
    This paper offers an account of an important type of human relationship: relationships based on shared ends. These are an indispensable part of most ethically worthy or valuable lives, and our successes or failures at participating in these relationships constitute a great number of our moral successes or failures overall. While many philosophers agree about their importance, few provide us with well-developed accounts of the nature and value of good shared-end relationships. This paper begins to develop a positive account of (...)
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  18. Telling Others to Do What You Believe Is Morally Wrong: The Case of Confucius and Zai Wo.Frederick Choo - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (2):106-115.
    Can it ever be morally justifiable to tell others to do what we ourselves believe is morally wrong to do? The common sense answer is no. It seems that we should never tell others to do something if we think it is morally wrong to do that act. My first goal is to argue that in Analects 17.21, Confucius tells his disciple not to observe a ritual even though Confucius himself believes that it is morally wrong that one does not (...)
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  19. The Suberogation Problem for Lei Zhong's Confucian Virtue Theory of Supererogation.Tsung-Hsing Ho - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (3):779-784.
    A virtue-based theory of right action aims to explain deontic moral principles in terms of virtue and vice. For example, it may maintain the following account of moral obligation: It is morally obligatory for an agent A to ϕ in circumstances C if and only if a fully virtuous and relevantly informed person V would characteristically ϕ in C. However, this account faces the so-called supererogation problem. A supererogatory action is an action that is morally praiseworthy but not morally obligatory. (...)
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  20. The Ethical Implications of Sengzhao’s Concept of the Sage.Wei-Hung Yen - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (1):79-87.
    ABSTRACTThis paper is an exploration of the ethical significance of Sengzhao’s concept of the sage as exhibited through a Buddhist practitioner’s expanded understanding and cognition of reality. From a philosophical point of view, I aim to show that the ethical significance of his concept of the sage comprises a shift first from ontology to epistemology, and then from epistemology to ethics. I firstly define Sengzhao’s concept of the sage and present a preliminary account of this concept before elaborating on its (...)
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  21. 與非洲相比在中國的價值.Thaddeus Metz - 2018 - In Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (ed.), 汉学与当代中国座谈会文集(2017). China Social Sciences Press. pp. 612-619.
    Chinese (character) translation of part of an article that appeared in Philosophy East and West (2017).
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  22. Cultural Pluralism and Its Implications for Media Ethics.Thaddeus Metz - 2018 - In Patrick Plaisance (ed.), Communication and Media Ethics. De Gruyter. pp. 53-73.
    In the face of differences between the ethical religio-philosophies believed across the globe, how should a media ethicist theorize or make recommendations in the light of theory? One approach is relativist, taking each distinct moral worldview to be true only for its own people. A second approach is universalist, seeking to discover a handful of basic ethical principles that are already shared by all the world's peoples. After providing reasons to doubt both of these approaches to doing media ethics, consideration (...)
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  23. Values in China as Compared to Africa: Two Conceptions of Harmony (Repr.).Thaddeus Metz - 2018 - In The Collected Works at the Symposium on Chinese Studies 2017. China Social Sciences Press. pp. 620-631.
    English reprint of part of an article first appearing in Philosophy East and West (2017).
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  24. Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction.Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Polity.
    Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism. It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and has had a profound influence on modern Chinese society. -/- Based on the latest scholarship but presented in accessible language, Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction is organized around themes that are central in Neo-Confucian philosophy, including the structure of the cosmos, human nature, ways (...)
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  25. Impartiality, Close Friendships and the Confucian Tradition.Andrew Lambert - 2017 - In Marlein van Raalte Carla Risseeuw (ed.), Conceptualizing Friendship in Time and Place. Leiden: Brill. pp. 205-228.
    This article explores the relationship between friendship and morality. Two ideas have been influential in the history of moral philosophy: the impartial standpoint and close friendship. These two perspectives on thought and action can conflict, however, and such a case is presented here. In an attempt to resolve these tensions, and understand the assumption that gives rise to it, I explore an alternative conception of moral conduct and friendship suggested by early Confucian thought. Within this account, moral conduct is that (...)
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  26. Values in China as Compared to Africa: Two Conceptions of Harmony.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):441-465.
    Given a 21st century context of sophisticated market economies and other Western influences such as Christianity, what similarities and differences are there between characteristic indigenous values of sub-Saharan Africa and China, and how do they continue to influence everyday life in these societies? Establishing that central to both non-Western, indigenous value systems are ideals of harmonious relationships, I compare and contrast traditional African and Chinese conceptions of harmony and analyze a number of respects in which an appeal to this value (...)
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  27. Confucianism and African Philosophy.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - In Toyin Falola & Adeshina Afolayan (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of African Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 207-222.
    A reprint in English of 'Confucianism and African Conceptions of Value, Reality and Knowledge' (International Social Science Journal, Chinese Edition, 2016).
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  28. Is Confucian Harmony Foundationless?: A Critical Question for Chenyang Li.Fan Ruiping - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):246-256.
    Professor Chenyang Li’s insightful volume, The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony, is the first book-length, content-rich, and serious exploration of the Confucian ideal of he 和, harmony. The book convincingly shows that Confucianism cherishes harmonious relations and emphasizes the utmost goal of world harmony.1 To take harmony as a supreme value, Li wants us to “maintain a high level of harmony consciousness” and “give harmony a prominent place in exercising judgments in daily life”. In a nutshell, Confucian harmony has five key (...)
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  29. Tension and Harmony : A Comment on Chenyang Li’s The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony.Chiu Wai Wai - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):237-245.
    Chenyang Li’s new book, The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony, challenges current interpretations of Confucianism by focusing on a long neglected idea — harmony. It also challenges an ideology, found in both the East and the West, that harmony is either static conformity or well-disguised conflict. As Li explains, the book is a reclamation of ‘harmony’ for its proper use in designating the kind of harmony advocated in traditional Chinese thought and, mainly, Confucianism.1 Li does this by carefully examining the status (...)
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  30. Integrative Dialogue as a Path to Universalism: The Case of Buber and Zhuangzi.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2016 - Dialogue and Universalism 26 (4):87-104.
    I argue that it is through an integrative dialogue based on the Ijing model of cooperative and cyclical change rather, than a Marxist or neo-Marxist dialectical model of change based upon the Hegelian model of conflict and replacement, that promises the greatest possibility of peaceful coexistence. As a case study of a dialogue between civilizations, I utilize both a mythical and an historical encounter between Martin Buber, representing the West, and Zhuangzi, representing the East. I show that despite the vast (...)
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  31. Moral Virtue, Civic Virtue, and Pluralism.Stephen Angle - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):447-452.
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  32. From Puzzling Pleasures to Moral Practices: Aristotle and Abhinavagupta on the Aesthetics and Ethics of Tragedy.Geoff Ashton & Sonja Tanner - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (1):13-39.
    For well over a thousand years, countless audiences have taken pleasure in watching unfold the following fearful event:Filled with dread, desperately tossing unchewed grass from its mouth, looking back at the hunting king, a beautiful deer springs into flight to escape a fast-approaching chariot from which repeated arrows fly — one of which will inevitably lodge in the deer’s defenseless body. This is not a scene from “National Geographic” or an episode from some sadly popular TV hunting show. Indeed, this (...)
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  33. Psychological Argumentation in Confucian Ethics as a Methodological Issue in Cross-Cultural Philosophy.Rafal Banka - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):591-606.
    Graham Priest claims that Asian philosophy is going to constitute one of the most important aspects in 21st-century philosophical research. Assuming that this statement is true, it leads to a methodological question whether the dominant comparative and contrastive approaches will be supplanted by a more unifying methodology that works across different philosophical traditions. In this article, I concentrate on the use of empirical evidence from nonphilosophical disciplines, which enjoys popularity among many Western philosophers, and examine the application of this approach (...)
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  34. Confucianism, Buddhism, and Virtue Ethics.Bradford Cokelet - 2016 - European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):187-214.
    Are Confucian and Buddhist ethical views closer to Kantian, Consequentialist, or Virtue Ethical ones? And how can such comparisons shed light on the unique aspects of Confucian and Buddhist views? This essay (i) provides a historically grounded framework for distinguishing western views, (ii) identifies a series of questions that we can ask in order to clarify the philosophic accounts of ethical motivation embedded in the Buddhist and Confucian traditions, and (iii) then critiques Lee Ming-huei’s claim that Confucianism is closer to (...)
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  35. The Shenzi Fragments: A Philosophical Analysis and Translation.Eirik Lang Harris - 2016 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    The Shenzi Fragments is the first complete translation in any Western language of the extant work of Shen Dao (350–275 B.C.E.). Though his writings have been recounted and interpreted in many texts, particularly in the work of Xunzi and Han Fei, very few Western scholars have encountered the political philosopher's original, influential formulations. This volume contains both a translation and an analysis of the Shenzi Fragments. It explains their distillation of the potent political theories circulating in China during the Warring (...)
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  36. A Critical Survey of Some Recent Philosophical Research in China.Xingming Hu - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (4):971-998.
    In this paper, I survey some recent literature produced by the established Chinese philosophers who regularly publish in Chinese philosophy journals and work in Mainland China. Specifically, I review the recent research of these philosophers in two areas: Chinese Philosophy and epistemology. In each area, I focus on two topics that have caught the attention of a lot of Chinese philosophers. I argue that the Chinese philosophers’ research on these topics has two prevalent problems: (i) a lot of arguments they (...)
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  37. Born of Resentment: Yuan 怨 in Early Confucian Thought.Michael D. K. Ing - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (1):19-33.
    This essay explores the positive aspects of resentment in early Confucian thought. Specifically, it argues that from an early Confucian perspective, resentment is a frustration or anger that occurs when those close to us withhold their care or when they otherwise injure us. Stated succinctly, resentment is a result of frustrated desire for affection. It is a sign that we require the care of significant others, and that we are vulnerable to their concern or neglect. When understood appropriately, resentment signals (...)
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  38. Li Zehou's Reconception of the Confucian Ethics of Emotion.Jinhua Jia - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):757-786.
    Li Zehou 李澤厚, one of the outstanding contemporary thinkers, coins the term “emotio-rational structure” for his ethical theory. Li emphasizes a balanced and integrated structure of emotion and reason, and the core of this structure is an innovative combination of Kantian rationalism and Confucian ethics. Li admires Immanuel Kant’s rational ontology of ethics, but criticizes his exclusion of human emotion and desire. Li advocates complementing Kantian rationalism with the Confucian ethics of emotion, which he calls “emotion as substance”. He believes (...)
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  39. Correlative Reasoning About Water in Mengzi 6A2.Nicholaos Jones - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):193-207.
    Mengzi 孟子 6A2 contains the famous water analogy for the innate goodness of human nature. Some evaluate Mengzi’s reasoning as strong and sophisticated; others, as weak or sophistical. I urge for more nuance in our evaluation. Mengzi’s reasoning fares poorly when judged by contemporary standards of analogical strength. However, if we evaluate the analogy as an instance of correlative thinking within a yin-yang 陰陽 cosmology, his reasoning fares well. That cosmology provides good reason to assert that water tends to flow (...)
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  40. Harmony: Super Value or Multiple Values? A Review of Li Chenyang’s The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony.Y. U. Kam-por - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):421-426.
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  41. Confucian Harmony, Greek Harmony, and Liberal Harmony.Chenyang Li - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):427-435.
  42. Confucian Harmony From an African Perspective.Thaddeus Metz - 2016 - African and Asian Studies 15 (1):1-22.
    Chenyang Li’s new book, The Philosophy of Confucian Harmony, has been heralded as the first book-length exposition of the concept of harmony in the approximately 3,000 year old Confucian tradition. It provides a systematic analysis of Confucian harmony and defence of its relevance for contemporary moral and political thought. In this philosophical discussion of Li’s book, I expound its central claims, contextualize them relative to other salient work in English-speaking Confucian thought, and critically reflect on them in light of a (...)
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  43. Brecht's Materialist Ethics Between Confucianism and Mohism.Markus Wessendorf - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (1):122-145.
    Bertolt Brecht is internationally known as one of the most influential dramatists, directors, and theater theorists of the twentieth century and also, within German culture, as one of its most innovative modern poets and prose stylists. Whereas Brecht’s contributions to a Marxist aesthetics of drama, theater, poetry, and prose are widely acknowledged, he is less well known as a major thinker on ethical issues, mostly because of his materialist orientation, which conflicts with ethical traditions rooted in metaphysics. Against these traditions, (...)
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  44. A Confucian Virtue Theory of Supererogation.Lei Zhong - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (1):328-341.
    Contemporary virtue ethicists have attempted to offer a virtue-based account of right action. However, such an account is faced by a daunting challenge, the ‘supererogation problem’ as it may be called. Since what a virtuous person would characteristically do is often beyond the scope of moral duty, virtue ethics seems to have difficulty in accommodating the distinction between obligation and supererogation. This essay aims to meet this challenge by recommending a Confucian virtue theory of supererogation.
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  45. Li, Chenyang,The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony: London and New York: Routledge, 2014, Xvi + 197 Pages.Daniel A. Bell - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (1):143-146.
  46. The Value of Authenticity: Another Dimension of Confucian Ethics.Xunwu Chen - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (2):172-187.
    This paper explores the Confucian value of authenticity. Taking as the starting point of the Confucian concept of becoming authentic persons of bo, da, jing, and shen, the paper first demonstrates that a high–far–firm zhixiang, creativity, an examined life, and sincerity are four necessary conditions for a self to be an authentic one of bo, da, jing, and shen. It then demonstrates that Confucian ethics operates with a metaphysical concept of a substantive self and Confucian self-cultivation implies authenticating such a (...)
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  47. On the “Virtue Turn” and the Problem of Categorizing Chinese Thought.Eric L. Hutton - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):331-353.
    A growing number of scholars have come to view Confucians and other Chinese thinkers as virtue ethicists. Other scholars, though, have challenged this classification. This essay discusses some of the problems that surround this debate, points out shortcomings in some of the criticisms that have been made, and offers suggestions about how best to develop a productive discussion about the issue.
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  48. The Limits of Moral Maturity.Michael D. K. Ing - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):567-572.
  49. On the Possibility of Universal Love for All Humans: A Comparative Study of Confucian and Christian Ethics.Qingping Liu - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (3):225-237.
    On the one hand, Confucianism and Christianity advocate universal love for all humans on the ultimate basis of particular love for parents or for God respectively. On the other hand, they have to sacrifice the former for the latter in cases of conflict since they give top priority merely to the latter. In order to overcome this paradox in theory and realize the ideal of universal love in practice, they should transform their particularistic frameworks into universalistic ones and assign a (...)
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  50. Introduction and Concluding Recommendations.Thaddeus Metz & Hester du Plessis - 2015 - In Hester du Plessis (ed.), The Rise and Decline and Rise of China: Searching for an Organising Philosophy. Real African Publishers. pp. 19-28, 343-361.
    Reflections on recent Chinese socio-economic development, insofar as it has been influenced by values, especially Confucianism, and what lessons there are to be learned for understanding sub-Saharan African values and how best to develop in that context.
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1 — 50 / 769