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  1. 1 Pode haver uma filosofia Chinesa? - revisão de 'Searle's Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy' (Filosofia de Searle e Filosofia Chinesa) - Bo Mou Ed 440p (2008) (revisão revisada 2019).Michael Richard Starks - 2020 - In Entendendo as Conexões entre Ciência, Filosofia, Psicologia, Religião, Política, Economia, História e Literatura - Artigos e Avaliações 2006-2019. Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press. pp. 93-123.
    Este livro é inestimável como uma sinopse de algumas das obras de um dos maiores filósofos dos últimos tempos. Há muito valor em analisar suas respostas às confusões básicas da filosofia, e em tentativas geralmente excelentes de conectar o pensamento clássico chinês com a filosofia moderna. Eu tenho uma visão moderna de Wittgensteiniano para colocá-lo em perspectiva. Aqueles que querem uma estrutura completa até o momento para o comportamento humano do ponto de vista moderno de dois sistemas podem consultar meus (...)
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  2. The Metaphysics of Dao in W Ang Bi’s Interpretation of Laozi.Hao Hong - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (2):219-240.
    WANG Bi 王弼 develops a metaphysic of Dao 道 in his Commentary on Laozi and “The Structure of Laozi’s Subtle Pointers.” I summarize this metaphysic as the following thesis: Dao is featureless and is the ultimate reason why the myriad things exist and are the ways they are. I develop a systematic account of this thesis: I provide an interpretation of the featurelessness of Dao and show how Dao’s featurelessness relates to its fundamental explanatory role as the ontological ground for (...)
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  3. The Nonduality of Motion and Rest: Sengzhao on the Change of Things.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2018 - In Youru Charlie Wang & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Dao Companion to Chinese Buddhist Philosophy. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 175-188.
    In his essay “Things Do Not Move,” Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a prominent Chinese Buddhist philosopher, argues for the thesis that the myriad things do not move in time. This view is counter-intuitive and seems to run counter to the Mahayana Buddhist doctrine of emptiness. In this book chapter, I assess Sengzhao’s arguments for his thesis, elucidate his stance on the change/nonchange of things, and discuss related problems. I argue that although Sengzhao is keen on showing the plausibility of the thesis, (...)
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  4. The Unity of Opposites.Xinyan Jiang - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 8:95-99.
    In the universe, there are countless pairs of opposites. In Chinese philosophy, there are general names for these opposites, i.e., yin and yang. In this paper I argue that the unity of opposites is a theme common to Heraclitus, a pre-Socratic philosopher, and Laozi, the best known Daoist. More specifically, I argue that both Heraclitus and Laozi believe the following: 1) opposites produce and depend on each other, without one there can’t be another; 2) each thing in the universe consists (...)
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  5. The Philosophical Thought of Wang Chong.Alexus McLeod - 2018 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book is a study of the methodological, metaphysical, and epistemological work of the Eastern Han Dynasty period scholar Wang Chong. It presents Wang’s philosophical thought as a unique and syncretic culmination of a number of ideas developed in earlier Han and Warring States philosophy. Wang’s philosophical methodology and his theories of truth, knowledge, and will and determinism offer solutions to a number of problems in the early Chinese tradition. His views also have much to offer contemporary philosophy, suggesting new (...)
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  6. Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction.Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Polity.
    Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism. It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and has had a profound influence on modern Chinese society. -/- Based on the latest scholarship but presented in accessible language, Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction is organized around themes that are central in Neo-Confucian philosophy, including the structure of the cosmos, human nature, ways (...)
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  7. Study on Logic Reasoning and Ideological Characteristic of “Equivalence of Life and Death” of Chuang-Tzu. Di Wu - 2017 - Theory Horizon 526 (6):46-51.
    The Concept of Life and Death of Chuang-tzu have inherited and developed Confucianism and Taoism thoughts, establishing Ontological foundation of "Life - Body", distinguishing the transcendental concept of "Dead Heart" and the empirical concept of "Death Body", as well as proposing the thought of "Equivalence of Life and Death" finally. The logic Reasoning of Chuang-tzu "Equivalence of Life and Death", start from constructing the equal status of "Life" and “Death" from ontological argument. Life and Death then are reduced to be (...)
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  8. Phenomenology of Embodied Intersubjectivity: From Zhuangzi to Hermann Schmitz.Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2017 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2017 (2):291-303.
    Hermann Schmitz has developed a “New Phenomenology.” It emphasizes fundamental conceptions that undercut traditional subject-object distinctions. In the Chinese classic The Zhuangzi we find stories that describe involvements and dialogue that can be seen as doing something similar. I will bring out some of these parallels. In particular I will focus on freedom and mutual understanding.
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  9. Integrative Dialogue as a Path to Universalism: The Case of Buber and Zhuangzi.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2016 - Dialogue and Universalism 26 (4):87-104.
    I argue that it is through an integrative dialogue based on the Ijing model of cooperative and cyclical change rather, than a Marxist or neo-Marxist dialectical model of change based upon the Hegelian model of conflict and replacement, that promises the greatest possibility of peaceful coexistence. As a case study of a dialogue between civilizations, I utilize both a mythical and an historical encounter between Martin Buber, representing the West, and Zhuangzi, representing the East. I show that despite the vast (...)
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  10. Review of Chenyang Li and Franklin Perkins, Eds., Chinese Metaphysics and Its Problems. [REVIEW]Joseph A. Adler - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015 (07.17).
  11. Saving Creativity in Whitehead and Saving Whitehead Through Zhu Xi.Gregory Aisemberg - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1149-1173.
    At the fore of concern within Whitehead scholarship are the main interpretive issues revolving around the relationships of God, creativity, and the world. Some critics have charged that Whitehead’s mature thought suffers from a lack of coherence in his formulation of the relationship between God and creativity as they function in cosmic generativity, a charge proven difficult to overcome. Such critics have posed the following question. In light of Whitehead’s commitment to the Ontological Principle, how can God and creativity stand (...)
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  12. Fine Aphorisms, Proverbs & Philosophical Quotes.Yoji K. Gondor (ed.) - 2014 - Sintesi Point Publishing.
    This is a small collection of proverbs with some philosophical content. I also included here are some of my favorite philosophical quotes. The quotes were collected during many years from my personal reading. I am sure that the reader will identify and enjoy proverbs and some quotes that are new and unique to this publication. A printed copy available at amazon.com. Feedback: gondork@yahoo.com .
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  13. The Way of Nonacquisition: Jizang's Philosophy of Ontic Indeterminacy.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2014 - In Chen-Kuo Lin & Michael Radich (eds.), A Distant Mirror: Articulating Indic Ideas in Sixth and Seventh Century Chinese Buddhism. Hamburg: Hamburg University Press. pp. 397-418.
    For Jizang (549−623), a prominent philosophical exponent of Chinese Madhyamaka, all things are empty of determinate form or nature. Given anything X, no linguistic item can truly and conclusively be applied to X in the sense of positing a determinate form or nature therein. This philosophy of ontic indeterminacy is connected closely with his notion of the Way (dao), which seems to indicate a kind of ineffable principle of reality. However, Jizang also equates the Way with nonacquisition as a conscious (...)
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  14. Emptiness as Subject-Object Unity: Sengzhao on the Way Things Truly Are.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2014 - In JeeLoo Liu & Douglas Berger (eds.), Nothingness in Asian Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 104-118.
    Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a leading Chinese Mādhyamika philosopher, holds that the myriad things are empty, and that they are, at bottom, the same as emptiness qua the way things truly are. In this paper, I distinguish the level of the myriad things from that of the way things truly are and call them, respectively, the ontic and the ontological levels. For Sengzhao, the myriad things at the ontic level are indeterminate and empty, and he equates the way things truly are (...)
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  15. Nishitani on Emptiness and Historical Consciousness.Chen-kuo Lin - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):491-506.
    This essay focuses on Nishitani Keiji’s 西谷啟治 early and late thinking, in the discourse on world history and modernity during wartime and the postwar meditation on emptiness and historicity in Religion and Nothingness. Following the first part of the analysis, I will trace Nishitani’s critical indebtedness to Heidegger’s existential-phenomenological analysis of historicity in Being and Time, and thereby analyze how Nishitani attempts to solve the aporia of modernity by recourse to the Buddhist doctrine of emptiness. The essay will conclude with (...)
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  16. Xunzi and Virtue Epistemology.Cheng-Hung Tsai - 2014 - Universitas 41 (3):121-142.
    Regulative virtue epistemology argues that intellectual virtues can adjust and guide one’s epistemic actions as well as improve on the quality of the epistemic actions. For regulative virtue epistemologists, intellectual virtues can be cultivated to a higher degree; when the quality of intellectual virtue is better, the resulting quality of epistemic action is better. The intellectual virtues that regulative epistemologists talk about are character virtues (such as intellectual courage and open-mindedness) rather than faculty virtues (such as sight and hearing), since (...)
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  17. The Cosmos as Creative Mind: Spontaneous Arising, Generating, and Creating in the Heng Xian.Erica F. Brindley - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):189-206.
    One of the key concepts in the Heng Xian is the concept of creation, as expressed through a process of spontaneous arising and spontaneous generation. This article analyzes the mechanics of spontaneous creation in terms of the cosmogony that is prominent in the text. I also show how psychomorphic descriptions of the cosmos—associated with the process of cosmogenesis—provide an explanation for change and movement in the cosmos as well as a template for idealized human action in the world. Lastly, I (...)
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  18. A Philosophical Translation of the Heng Xian.Erica F. Brindley, Paul R. Goldin & Esther S. Klein - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):145-151.
  19. Permanence, Something, Being: The Cosmogonic Argument of the Heng Xian.Andrei Gomouline - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):179-188.
    The Heng Xian is one of the recently discovered paleographic materials that disclose a heretofore unknown richness of the cosmogonic thought of early China and contribute to our understanding of the elaboration of a uniform cosmogonic discourse during the late Warring States period. Focusing on the structure and vocabulary of the Heng Xian account, the present paper attempts to explore the conceptual core of its cosmogonic vision. Based on the idea of the spontaneous self-generation of the world out of some (...)
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  20. Ontic Indeterminacy and Paradoxical Language: A Philosophical Analysis of Sengzhao’s Linguistic Thought.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):505-522.
    For Sengzhao (374−414 CE), a leading Sanlun philosopher of Chinese Buddhism, things in the world are ontologically indeterminate in that they are devoid of any determinate form or nature. In his view, we should understand and use words provisionally, so that they are not taken to connote the determinacy of their referents. To echo the notion of ontic indeterminacy and indicate the provisionality of language, his main work, the Zhaolun, abounds in paradoxical expressions. In this essay, I offer a philosophical (...)
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  21. Constancy and the Changes: A Comparative Reading of Heng Xian.Esther S. Klein - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):207-224.
    This article explores the connection between the Heng Xian and the Changes of Zhou tradition, especially the “Tuan” and “Attached Verbalizations” commentaries. Two important Heng Xian terms—heng 恆 and fu 復—are also Changes of Zhou hexagrams and possible connections are explored. Second, the Heng Xian account of the creation of names is compared with the “Attached Verbalizations” account of the creation of the Changes of Zhou system. Third, the roles played by knowing and desire in both Heng Xian and the (...)
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  22. The Spontaneous Generation of the Human in the “Heng Xian”.Franklin Perkins - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):225-240.
    This essay argues that the “Heng Xian” bridges between two distinct discourses that were both prevalent in the late fourth century. One discourse focused on the origination of the natural world through a spontaneous process of differentiation, a position familiar from the Daodejing and “Tai yi sheng shui.” The other focused on the specific ways in which different kinds of things live, a position known primarily from Ru discussions centering on the concept of xing 性, the nature or spontaneous reactions (...)
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  23. Realism in Religion. By Robert C. Neville. (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2009. Xiv, 265 Pp. Hardback. ISBN 1438428251.).C. Wesley DeMarco - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):310-313.
  24. Huayan Buddhism and Dewey: Emptiness, Compassion, and the Philosophical Fallacy.Gregory M. Fahy - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):260-271.
    Huayan Buddhist philosophers and John Dewey share a perspective on emptiness or dependent origination. This article compares Dewey's local, contextual, and relational metaphysics with Huayan thinkers’ use of the metaphor of Indra's jewel net to extend their relational metaphysics to an infinite extent. Huayan thinkers base their ethics of compassion on the recognition of the infinite relatedness of all things. Dewey prefers constructing social institutions that foster experiences that are reliably aesthetically unified. This dispute is significant because pragmatism and Buddhism (...)
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  25. Emptiness, Selflessness, and Transcendence: William James’s Reading of Chinese Buddhism.John J. Kaag - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):240-259.
    This article investigates William James's reading of the concepts of selflessness and transcendence in relation to the Chan and Pure Land schools of Chinese Buddhism. The divide between Chan and Pure Land Buddhism may be mediated if we attend to aspects of the two traditions that James found particularly meaningful. James is drawn to selflessness as presented in the concept of emptiness in the Chan understanding of meditative experience. He is equally interested in Buddhist devotional practices of Pure Land that (...)
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  26. Kupperman, Joel J., Theories of Human Nature: Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2010, X + 199 Pages. [REVIEW]Matthew D. Walker - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):253-257.
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  27. The Expansion of Epistemology: The Metaphysical Vs. The Practical Approach.Zhenhua Yu - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):83-100.
    From the perspective of world philosophy, one phenomenon of the 20th century is quite intriguing. Certain philosophers in China as well as in the West, finding the traditional conception of epistemology too narrow-minded, argued that its scope should be expanded. The Chinese way of expanding epistemology might be called the metaphysical approach, and the Western way the practical approach. In this article, I will first give an outline of both approaches and then try to demonstrate that a substantial dialogue can (...)
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  28. Ren Xing and What It is to Be Truly Human.Dennis Arjo - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):455-473.
  29. Crisis and Possibility: The Ethical Implication of Contingency.Xunwu Chen - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (3):257 - 268.
    This essay argues that a person's fate is defined by the interaction of necessity and contingency, indicating that a person's existential competence consists of his or her ability to dance well with both necessity and contingency, not merely with either of them. As a result, it rejects the traditional association of fate with fatalism and fatality on the one hand and resists the present current to define individual fate and identity merely in terms of contingency and as contingency on the (...)
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  30. Interpreting Paradigm of Change in Chinese Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):339-367.
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  31. Preface: Unity of Heaven and Man in the Yijing.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):333-334.
  32. Knowledge and Error in Early Chinese Thought.Chris Fraser - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):127-148.
    Drawing primarily on the Mòzǐ and Xúnzǐ, the article proposes an account of how knowledge and error are understood in classical Chinese epistemology and applies it to explain the absence of a skeptical argument from illusion in early Chinese thought. Arguments from illusion are associated with a representational conception of mind and knowledge, which allows the possibility of a comprehensive or persistent gap between appearance and reality. By contrast, early Chinese thinkers understand mind and knowledge primarily in terms of competence (...)
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  33. A Discourse on the Problem of Consciousness From the Viewpoint of Oriental Philosophy.Chien-Te Lin - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (3):303 - 321.
    This paper discusses the possible inspirations that might be derived from the viewpoints of Eastern Philosophy in contemporary studies of consciousness. First of all, two notions of consciousness are introduced, one of which can be explained by science. The other however cannot, and as such is also called the ?Hard Problem?. Secondly, the special features shared by morality and the ?Hard Problem of Consciousness? are discussed. Thirdly, I discuss the conventional routes Oriental philosophy takes toward an exploration of the human (...)
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  34. Introduction: Onto‐Hermeneutics, Ethics, and Nature in the Yijing.Eric S. Nelson - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):335-338.
  35. The “Dual Citizenship” of Emptiness: A Reading of the Bu Zhenkong Lun.Galia Patt-Shamir - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):474-490.
  36. The Warring States Concept of Xing.Dan Robins - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):31-51.
    This essay defends a novel interpretation of the term xìng 性 as it occurs in Chinese texts of the late Warring States period (roughly 320–221 BCE). The term played an important role both in the famous controversy over the goodness or badness of people’s xìng and elsewhere in the intellectual discourse of the period. Extending especially the work of A.C. Graham, the essay stresses the importance for understanding xìng of early Chinese assumptions about spontaneity, continuity, health, and (in the human (...)
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  37. The Yijing: Metaphysics and Physics.Andreas Schöter - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):412-426.
  38. Truth, Deception, and Skillful Means in the Lotus Sūtra.John Schroeder - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (1):35-52.
    This article seeks to broaden contemporary scholarship on the Lotus S?tra by arguing that it is a philosophically critical, self-reflective text struggling with problems of truth in Buddhist discourse. While all Lotus S?tra scholars agree that the doctrine of skillful means is a central teaching in the text, there is a common tendency to frame skillful means as a passive vehicle (or ?means?) for expressing truth rather than an active philosophical critique of truth. This article argues that the Lotus S?tra (...)
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  39. Nonsubstantialism of the Awakening of Faith in Mou Zongsan.Henry C. H. Shiu - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):223-237.
  40. Unfolding Mozi's Standard of Sound Doctrine.Steven A. Stegeman - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (3):227 - 239.
    This essay revolves around a careful assessment of Hui-chieh Loy's essay ?Justification and Debate: Thoughts on Moist Moral Epistemology?. There is much to appreciate in Loy's analysis of the standard of sound doctrine in the ?Against Fatalism? chapters of the Mozi, but a close reading of Loy's essay reveals problematic aspects in his approach along both hermeneutic and logical lines. For one, he groups Mozi's tests of the standard of sound doctrine in a way that does not square well with (...)
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  41. Expanding Process: Exploring Philosophical and Theological Transformations in China and the West (Review). [REVIEW]Ian M. Sullivan - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (4):741-744.
    Expanding Process, Exploring Philosophical and Theological Transformations in China and the West, by John Berthrong, is a model study of processive motifs in Chinese traditions and their contributions to global process-relational philosophy. Process-relational philosophy, which became a full-fledged school of thought in the twentieth century with the works of Alfred North Whitehead and the American Pragmatists, conceives of reality as constant flux. This metaphysical view is opposed to the substance-ontological view, which understands reality as a composition of timeless, discrete substances, (...)
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  42. The Perfectibility of Human Nature in Eastern and Western Thought (Review).Warren Todd - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (3):568-572.
  43. Continuity of Heart-Mind and Things-Events: A Systematic Reconstruction of Neo-Confucian Epistemology.Haiming Wen - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (3):269 - 290.
    Many scholars argue that there is no epistemology in Chinese philosophy, or that an epistemological sensibility was not fully developed in Chinese thinking. This leads western audiences to mistakenly think that Chinese philosophy is not properly ?philosophical?. This paper argues that there is a great deal of discourse about understanding the world as a whole in ancient Chinese philosophy. Taking Song-ming Neo-Confucianism as an example, the author shows that most researchers do not uncover its philosophical advancement as it developed throughout (...)
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  44. Kant and Daoism on Nothingness.Mario Wenning - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):556-568.
  45. Yang, Guorong 楊國榮: The Self-Maturating and the Maturating of Things: The Becoming of the World of Meaning 成己與成物—意義世界的生成.: Beijing 北京: Renmin Chubanshe 人民出版社, 2010, 303 Pages.Feng Xiang - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):269-271.
    Yang, Guorong 楊國榮: The Self-maturating and the Maturating of Things: The Becoming of the World of Meaning 成己與成物—意義世界的生成. Content Type Journal Article Pages 269-271 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9214-5 Authors Feng Xiang, Department of Philosophy, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200241 People’s Republic of China Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 10 Journal Issue Volume 10, Number 2.
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  46. Between Mind and Trace — A Research Into the Theories on Xin 心 (Mind) of Early Song Confucianism and Buddhism.Shiling Xiang - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):173-192.
    From Han Yu’s yuan Dao 原道 (retracing the Dao) to Ouyang Xiu’s lun ben 论本 (discussing the root), the conflicts arising from Confucianists’ rejection of Buddhism were focused on one point, namely, the examination of zhongxin suo shou 中心所守 (something kept in mind). The attitude towards the distinction between mind and trace, and the proper approach to erase the gap between emptiness and being, as well as that between the expedient and the true, became the major concerns unavoidable for various (...)
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  47. Do Differences in Grammatical Form Between Languages Explain Differences in Ontology Between Different Philosophical Traditions?: A Critique of the Mass-Noun Hypothesis.Xiaomei Yang - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):149-166.
    It is an assumed view in Chinese philosophy that the grammatical differences between English or Indo-European languages and classical Chinese explain some of the differences between the Western and Chinese philosophical discourses. Although some philosophers have expressed doubts about the general link between classical Chinese philosophy and syntactic form of classical Chinese, I discuss a specific hypothesis, i.e., the mass-noun hypothesis, in this essay. The mass-noun hypothesis assumes that a linguistic distinction such as between the singular terms and the predicates (...)
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  48. Semantic Criticism: The “Westernization” of the Concepts in Ancient Chinese Philosophy—A Discussion of Yan Fu's Theory of Qi.Zhenyu Zeng - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):100-113.
    Every philosophical mode has a unique conceptual system. Qi has consistently been a fundamental part of ancient Chinese philosophy, and its significance is obvious. Guided by the idea of re-evaluating all values, Yan Fu, who was deeply influenced by Western philosophy and logic, used reverse analogical interpretation to present a new explanation of the traditional Chinese concept of qi. Qi thus evolved into basic physical particles. Yan’s philosophical effort has great significance: The logical ambiguity that had haunted qi was overcome. (...)
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  49. The Virtual and the Vacant—Emptiness and Knowledge in Chan and Daoism.Barry Allen - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):457-471.
  50. Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition II: A Comparative Analysis of Personhood.Mary I. Bockover - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (4):317-325.
    This Philosophy Compass article continues the comparison between Confucian and mainstream Western views of personhood and their connection with ethics begun in Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Fundamental Concepts , by focusing on the Western self conceived as an independent agent with moral and political rights. More specifically, the present article briefly accounts for how the more strictly and explicitly individualistic notion of self dominating Western philosophy has developed, leading up to a recent debate in modern (...)
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