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  1. added 2019-01-15
    Postscript: Reply to McLeod.Lajos L. Brons - 2018 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Philosophy of Language, Chinese Language, Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement. Brill. pp. 364-370.
    This is my reply to McLeod’s reply (2015a) to my (2015) paper commenting on his (2011) interpretation of Wang Chong 王充 as an alethic pluralist.
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  2. added 2018-09-07
    Phenomenology of Embodied Intersubjectivity: From Zhuangzi to Hermann Schmitz.Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2017 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2017 (2):291-303.
    Hermann Schmitz has developed a “New Phenomenology.” It emphasizes fundamental conceptions that undercut traditional subject-object distinctions. In the Chinese classic The Zhuangzi we find stories that describe involvements and dialogue that can be seen as doing something similar. I will bring out some of these parallels. In particular I will focus on freedom and mutual understanding.
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  3. added 2018-05-13
    Can Knowing-How Skepticism Exist?Cheng-Hung Tsai - 2006 - Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy.
  4. added 2017-12-14
    Minds, Programs, and Chinese Philosophers: A Chinese Perspective on the Chinese Room.Koji Tanaka - 2004 - Sophia 43 (1):61-72.
    The paper is concerned with John Searle’s famous Chinese room argument. Despite being objected to by some, Searle’s Chinese room argument appears very appealing. This is because Searle’s argument is based on an intuition about the mind that ‘we’ all seem to share. Ironically, however, Chinese philosophers don’t seem to share this same intuition. The paper begins by first analysing Searle’s Chinee room argument. It then introduces what can be seen as the (implicit) Chinese view of the mind. Lastly, it (...)
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  5. added 2017-06-19
    Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction.Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Polity.
    Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism. It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and has had a profound influence on modern Chinese society. -/- Based on the latest scholarship but presented in accessible language, Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction is organized around themes that are central in Neo-Confucian philosophy, including the structure of the cosmos, human nature, ways (...)
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  6. added 2017-03-27
    Integrative Dialogue as a Path to Universalism: The Case of Buber and Zhuangzi.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2016 - Dialogue and Universalism 26 (4):87-104.
    I argue that it is through an integrative dialogue based on the Ijing model of cooperative and cyclical change rather, than a Marxist or neo-Marxist dialectical model of change based upon the Hegelian model of conflict and replacement, that promises the greatest possibility of peaceful coexistence. As a case study of a dialogue between civilizations, I utilize both a mythical and an historical encounter between Martin Buber, representing the West, and Zhuangzi, representing the East. I show that despite the vast (...)
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  7. added 2017-02-13
    On Heaven, Dao, Qi, Li, and Ze.Zhang Dainian - 1987 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 19 (1):3-45.
    "Heaven" is an important concept in ancient Chinese philosophy. In earliest times, "heaven" had two meanings: one referred to an anthropomorphic god, the other to the sky, the heavens, the complement of earth. Early religious thought believed that heaven had consciousness and was the supreme ruler of the world. When Confucius spoke of "heaven" he thought of it in this sense of the supreme ruler, as when he said, "If heaven had really intended this culture to perish, then later generations (...)
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  8. added 2017-02-13
    Growing in Emptiness: A Zen Way of Life.Swami Nirmalananda - 1985 - Journal of Dharma 10:157-164.
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  9. added 2017-02-10
    A Philosophical Translation of the Heng Xian.Erica F. Brindley, Paul R. Goldin & Esther S. Klein - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):145-151.
  10. added 2017-02-10
    The Spontaneous Generation of the Human in the “Heng Xian”.Franklin Perkins - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):225-240.
    This essay argues that the “Heng Xian” bridges between two distinct discourses that were both prevalent in the late fourth century. One discourse focused on the origination of the natural world through a spontaneous process of differentiation, a position familiar from the Daodejing and “Tai yi sheng shui.” The other focused on the specific ways in which different kinds of things live, a position known primarily from Ru discussions centering on the concept of xing 性, the nature or spontaneous reactions (...)
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  11. added 2017-02-01
    Praxis, Karman, and Creativity.David L. Hall - 1980 - Philosophy East and West 30 (1):57-64.
  12. added 2017-01-30
    Saving Creativity in Whitehead and Saving Whitehead Through Zhu Xi.Gregory Aisemberg - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1149-1173.
    At the fore of concern within Whitehead scholarship are the main interpretive issues revolving around the relationships of God, creativity, and the world. Some critics have charged that Whitehead’s mature thought suffers from a lack of coherence in his formulation of the relationship between God and creativity as they function in cosmic generativity, a charge proven difficult to overcome. Such critics have posed the following question. In light of Whitehead’s commitment to the Ontological Principle, how can God and creativity stand (...)
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  13. added 2017-01-28
    Metallurgy, Cosmology, Knowledge: The Chinese Experience.John Berthrong Ursula Franklin - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (4):333-370.
  14. added 2017-01-27
    Nishitani on Emptiness and Historical Consciousness.Chen-kuo Lin - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):491-506.
    This essay focuses on Nishitani Keiji’s 西谷啟治 early and late thinking, in the discourse on world history and modernity during wartime and the postwar meditation on emptiness and historicity in Religion and Nothingness. Following the first part of the analysis, I will trace Nishitani’s critical indebtedness to Heidegger’s existential-phenomenological analysis of historicity in Being and Time, and thereby analyze how Nishitani attempts to solve the aporia of modernity by recourse to the Buddhist doctrine of emptiness. The essay will conclude with (...)
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  15. added 2017-01-21
    Concerning Creativity: A Comparison of Whitehead, Neville, and Chu Hsi (Review).David L. Hall - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (4):571-576.
  16. added 2017-01-18
    God and Creativity in the Cosmologies of Whitehead and Bhāskara.J. Bruce Long - 1979 - Philosophy East and West 29 (4):395-420.
  17. added 2016-12-08
    A Reconstruction of Contemporary Confucianism as a Form of Knowledge.Li Xiangjun - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):561-571.
    Traditional Confucianism might be likened to a great tree, with various branches and trends of thought emerging from common roots. Continuing with this metaphor, Confucianism as a form of knowledge might be regarded as a main branch, and the resulting form of Confucianism constitutes the main body of Chinese learning. Due to modern society's transformation, Confucianism as a form of knowledge has begun to disappear and the form of Confucianism which has its own discourse system and problem consciousness has become (...)
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  18. added 2016-12-08
    Dipolarity in Chan Buddhism and the Whiteheadian God.Gu Linyu - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):211-222.
  19. added 2016-12-08
    Elucidation of Images in the Book of Changes: Ancient Insights Into Modern Language Philosophy and Hermeneutics.Ming Dong Gu - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):469-488.
  20. added 2016-12-08
    Neo-Confucian Orthodoxy and the Learning of the Mind-and-Heart.Wm Theodore de Bary - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
  21. added 2015-03-28
    Tasan Chæong Yag-Yong Æui Sæohak Sasang 1993-Yæondo Tasan Munhwaje Kinyæom Nonch°Ong.Andreas Choi - 1993 - Tasæot Sure.
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  22. added 2015-03-28
    Cosmology, Ontology, and Human Efficacy Essays in Chinese Thought.Richard J. Smith & D. W. Y. Kwok - 1993
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  23. added 2015-03-20
    Constancy and the Changes: A Comparative Reading of Heng Xian.Esther S. Klein - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):207-224.
    This article explores the connection between the Heng Xian and the Changes of Zhou tradition, especially the “Tuan” and “Attached Verbalizations” commentaries. Two important Heng Xian terms—heng 恆 and fu 復—are also Changes of Zhou hexagrams and possible connections are explored. Second, the Heng Xian account of the creation of names is compared with the “Attached Verbalizations” account of the creation of the Changes of Zhou system. Third, the roles played by knowing and desire in both Heng Xian and the (...)
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  24. added 2015-03-19
    Permanence, Something, Being: The Cosmogonic Argument of the Heng Xian.Andrei Gomouline - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):179-188.
    The Heng Xian is one of the recently discovered paleographic materials that disclose a heretofore unknown richness of the cosmogonic thought of early China and contribute to our understanding of the elaboration of a uniform cosmogonic discourse during the late Warring States period. Focusing on the structure and vocabulary of the Heng Xian account, the present paper attempts to explore the conceptual core of its cosmogonic vision. Based on the idea of the spontaneous self-generation of the world out of some (...)
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  25. added 2014-12-10
    Fine Aphorisms, Proverbs & Philosophical Quotes.Yoji K. Gondor (ed.) - 2014 - Sintesi Point Publishing.
    This is a small collection of proverbs with some philosophical content. I also included here are some of my favorite philosophical quotes. The quotes were collected during many years from my personal reading. I am sure that the reader will identify and enjoy proverbs and some quotes that are new and unique to this publication. A printed copy available at amazon.com. Feedback: gondork@yahoo.com .
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  26. added 2014-11-16
    The Nonduality of Motion and Rest: Sengzhao on the Change of Things.Chien-Hsing Ho - forthcoming - Springer.
    In his essay “Things Do Not Move,” Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a prominent Chinese Buddhist philosopher, argues for the thesis that the myriad things do not move in time. This view is counter-intuitive and seems to run counter to the Mahayana Buddhist doctrine of emptiness. In this book chapter, I assess Sengzhao’s arguments for his thesis, elucidate his stance on the change/nonchange of things, and discuss related problems. I argue that although Sengzhao is keen on showing the plausibility of the thesis, (...)
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  27. added 2014-05-02
    Xunzi and Virtue Epistemology.Cheng-Hung Tsai - 2014 - Universitas 41 (3):121-142.
    Regulative virtue epistemology argues that intellectual virtues can adjust and guide one’s epistemic actions as well as improve on the quality of the epistemic actions. For regulative virtue epistemologists, intellectual virtues can be cultivated to a higher degree; when the quality of intellectual virtue is better, the resulting quality of epistemic action is better. The intellectual virtues that regulative epistemologists talk about are character virtues (such as intellectual courage and open-mindedness) rather than faculty virtues (such as sight and hearing), since (...)
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  28. added 2014-04-03
    "New Lixue" Metaphysics: Examination and Critique.Chen Lai - 1994 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (3-4):363-396.
  29. added 2014-04-03
    The Challenge of Buddho-Taoist Metaphysics of Experience.Kenneth K. Inada - 1994 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (1):27-47.
  30. added 2014-04-03
    The Confucian, Taoist and Augustinian Approaches to Truth and Their Contemporary Implications.Martin Wu-Chi Lu - 1994 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (1):71-92.
  31. added 2014-04-02
    Daoism and Ecology: Ways Within a Cosmic Landscape.Deane Curtin - 2004 - Environmental Ethics 26 (1):105-106.
  32. added 2014-04-02
    Harmony (He) and Gender in Early Chinese Thought.Bret Hinsch - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (2):109-128.
  33. added 2014-04-02
    Selfhood and Identity in Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism: Contrasts with the West.David Y. F. Ho - 1995 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (2):115–139.
  34. added 2014-04-02
    Learning and Meaning: Cui Shu's Historical Epistemology.Shao Dongfang - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):309-349.
  35. added 2014-04-02
    Confucius and the Role of Reason.David E. Soles - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):249-261.
  36. added 2014-04-01
    Taoism and Jung: Synchronicity and the Self.Harold Coward - 1996 - Philosophy East and West 46 (4):477-495.
    What was the nature and degree of Eastern influence on Carl Jung's complex concept of "the Self"? It is argued that Chinese Taoism rather than Hinduism provided the fundamental formative influence on this central idea, especially as it is expressed through the I Ching. This influence came indirectly through the development of Jung's notion of "synchronicity," correlative parallels between the inner and the outer realms of experience.
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  37. added 2014-04-01
    Self‐Construction and Identity: The Confucian Self in Relation to Some Western Perceptions.Xinzhong Yao - 1996 - Asian Philosophy 6 (3):179 – 195.
    Abstract In contrast to the metaphysical, epistemological and psychological understandings of the self traditionally held and today still extensively considered in the West, the self in Confucianism is essentially an ethical concept, representing a holistic view of humanhood and a continuingly constructive process driven by self?cultivation and moral orientations. This paper first examines what is literally and philosophically meant by the self in these two traditions, then examines the contrasts or comparisons between the Confucian conception of the self and the (...)
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  38. added 2014-04-01
    Confucianism and Taoism in Response to Constructive Realism.Vincent Shen - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (1):59-78.
  39. added 2014-04-01
    Rorty and Chuang Tzu: Anti-Representationalism, Pluralism and Conversation.Kwang-Sae Lee - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (2):175-192.
  40. added 2014-04-01
    Skepsis as Metaphysical Principle and Epistemological Practice: Some Taoist and Greek Comparisons.Walter Benesch - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (4):467-487.
  41. added 2014-03-31
    Yang, Lihua 楊立華, Qi-Rooted and Shen-Transformed: Commentary on Zhang Zai's Philosophy 氣本與神化:張載哲學述評.Elizabeth Woo Li - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):487-489.
  42. added 2014-03-30
    Confucianism: Natural Law Chinese Style?Steven Greer & Tiong Piow Lim - 1998 - Ratio Juris 11 (1):80-89.
  43. added 2014-03-30
    Religious Dimensions of Confucianism: Cosmology and Cultivation.Mary Evelyn Tucker - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (1):5-45.
    Using the terms "cosmology" and "cultivation," the religious nature of Confucianism is explored, beginning with a discussion of the ambiguity surrounding Confucianism and its political uses, which often obscure its religious dimensions. It is also assumed that categories of Western theology such as immanence and transcendence are not adequate to describe Confucianism as religious. In this spirit, it is suggested that beyond political distortions or theoretical interpretations, Confucianism has religious dimensions that need to be explored further. The interaction of the (...)
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  44. added 2014-03-30
    The Dialectics of Nothingness: A Reexamination of Shen-Hsiu and Hui-Neng.Steven W. Laycock - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (1):19-41.
  45. added 2014-03-30
    A Defence of Mencius' Ethical Naturalism.James A. Ryan - 1997 - Asian Philosophy 7 (1):23 – 36.
    I argue that Mencius puts forth a defensible form of ethical naturalism, according to which moral properties, moral motivation, and moral deliberation can be accounted for within the parameters of a naturalistic worldview. On this position, moral properties are the subjectively real properties which acts have in virtue of their corresponding to our most coherent set of shared desires. I give a naturalistic definition of 'right' which, I argue, is implicit in Mencius' philosophy. I address the objection that some of (...)
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  46. added 2014-03-30
    Time and Emptiness in the Chao-Lun.Michael Berman - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (1):43-58.
  47. added 2014-03-30
    Yan: A Dimension of Praxis Yan a Dimension of Praxis and its Philosophical Implications.Sun Zhenbin - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (2):191-208.
  48. added 2014-03-29
    A Rethinking of Confucian Rationality.Xunwu Chen - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):483-504.
  49. added 2014-03-29
    Original Ontological Roots of Ancient Chinese Philosophy.Marina Čarnogurská - 1998 - Asian Philosophy 8 (3):203-213.
    Abstract This is a new attempt at an analysis of classical Chinese (Confucian) ethics which is still inappropriately explained by Western philosophy as a traditional normative ethical system. Special conditions of ancient Chinese anthropogeny and social and economic development gave rise in this cultural region to an original theory of being, which in modern terminology can be referred to as an ontological model of a fundamental Yin?Yang dialectic of a bipolar and non?homogeneous synergy of being. This theory of being became (...)
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  50. added 2014-03-29
    John S. Major, Heaven and Earth in Early Hun Thought, (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993), Xvi, 388 Pp. 14 Illustrations. [REVIEW]Harold D. Roth - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):161-167.
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1 — 50 / 372