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  1. Zhu XI's Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts.Joseph A. Adler - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (1133–1180) and the other “gentlemen of Hunan” from about 1167 to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi to (...)
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  2. Descriptive and Normative Principle (Li) in Confucian Moral Metaphysics: Is/Ought From the Chinese Perspective.Joseph A. Adler - 1981 - Zygon 16 (3):285-293.
  3. Saving Creativity in Whitehead and Saving Whitehead Through Zhu Xi.Gregory Aisemberg - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1149-1173.
    At the fore of concern within Whitehead scholarship are the main interpretive issues revolving around the relationships of God, creativity, and the world. Some critics have charged that Whitehead’s mature thought suffers from a lack of coherence in his formulation of the relationship between God and creativity as they function in cosmic generativity, a charge proven difficult to overcome. Such critics have posed the following question. In light of Whitehead’s commitment to the Ontological Principle, how can God and creativity stand (...)
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  4. The Virtual and the Vacant—Emptiness and Knowledge in Chan and Daoism.Barry Allen - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):457-471.
  5. Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots.Robert E. Allinson (ed.) - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
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  6. On the Question of Relativism in the Chuang-Tzu.Robert E. Allinson - 1989 - Philosophy East and West 39 (1):13-26.
    This article offers a meta-analysis of contemporary approaches aimed at resolving the internal, relativistic-non-relativistic tension within the text of the Chuang-Tzu. In the first section, the four most commonly applied approaches are unpacked and evaluated, ranging from relativistic approaches such as hard relativism and soft relativism, to approaches that acknowledge both relativism and non-relativism, as well as others which acknowledge neither of the two perspectives (relativism and non-relativism). After demonstrating the immanent difficulties these four types of approaches encounter, the latter (...)
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  7. A Fresh Look at Knowledge and Action: Wang Yangming in Comparative Perspective.Stephen C. Angle - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):287–298.
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  8. Ren Xing and What It is to Be Truly Human.Dennis Arjo - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):455-473.
  9. An Ontological Interpretation of You (Something) (有) and Wu (Nothing) (无) in the Laozi.Tongdong Bai - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):339-351.
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  10. Li in East Asian Buddhism: One Approach From Plato's Parmenides.James Behuniak Jr - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (1):31 – 49.
    In Plato's Parmenides , Socrates proposes a 'Day' analogy to express one possible model of part/whole relations. His analogy is swiftly rejected and replaced with another analogy, that of the 'Sail'. In this paper, it is argued that there is a profound difference between these two analogies and that the 'Day' represents a distinct way to think about part/whole relations. This way of thinking, I argue, is the standard way of thinking in East Asian Buddhism. Plato's 'Day' analogy can then (...)
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  11. Skepsis as Metaphysical Principle and Epistemological Practice: Some Taoist and Greek Comparisons.Walter Benesch - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (4):467-487.
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  12. Continuum Logic: A Chinese Contribution to Knowledge and Understanding in Philosophy and Science.Walter Benesch & Eduardo Wilner - 2002 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (4):471–494.
  13. Conceptions of Self/No‐Self and Modes of Connection Comparative Soteriological Structures in Classical Chinese Thought.Mark A. Berkson - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):293-331.
    This essay examines the ways that the terms "self and "no-self can illuminate the views of classical Chinese thinkers, particularly Confucians such as Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi, and the Daoist thinker Zhuangzi. In particular, the use of the term "no-self" to describe Zhuangzi's position is defended. The concepts of self and no-self are analyzed in relation to other terms within the thinkers' "concept clusters" - specifically temporality, nature, and social roles - and suggestions are given for constructing typologies that sort (...)
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  14. Time and Emptiness in the Chao-Lun.Michael Berman - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (1):43-58.
  15. The Metaphysics of Freedom.Bernard Berofsky - 1977 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (2):161-186.
  16. Li Yong (1627-1705) and Epistemological Dimensions of Confucian Philosophy.John Berthong - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):164-165.
  17. Inventing Zhu XI: Process of Principle.John Berthrong - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):257–279.
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  18. The Thoughtlessness of Unexamined Things.John Berthrong - 1980 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (2):131-151.
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  19. Response to Matthew Levy's Review of "Li Yong (1627-1705) and Epistemological Dimensions of Confucian Philosophy". [REVIEW]Anne D. Birdwhistell - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (1):164 - 165.
  20. Knowledge Heard and Seen: The Attempt in Early Chinese Philosophy to Analyze Experteential Knowledge.Anne D. Birdwmistell - 1984 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (1):67-82.
  21. Neo-Confucian Cosmology, Virtue Ethics, and Environmental Philosophy.Donald N. Blakeley - 2001 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):37-49.
    This paper explores the extent to which the Confucian concept of ren (humaneness) has application in ways that are comparable tocontemporary versions of environmental virtue ethics. I argue that the accounts of self-cultivation that are developed in major texts of the Confucian tradition have important direct implications for environmental thinking that even the Neo-Confucians do not seriously entertain.
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  22. Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition II: A Comparative Analysis of Personhood.Mary I. Bockover - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (4):317-325.
    This Philosophy Compass article continues the comparison between Confucian and mainstream Western views of personhood and their connection with ethics begun in Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Fundamental Concepts , by focusing on the Western self conceived as an independent agent with moral and political rights. More specifically, the present article briefly accounts for how the more strictly and explicitly individualistic notion of self dominating Western philosophy has developed, leading up to a recent debate in modern (...)
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  23. Recent Developments in the Physics of Time and General Cosmology.Michael Bradie - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (4):371-395.
  24. The Cosmos as Creative Mind: Spontaneous Arising, Generating, and Creating in the Heng Xian.Erica F. Brindley - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):189-206.
    One of the key concepts in the Heng Xian is the concept of creation, as expressed through a process of spontaneous arising and spontaneous generation. This article analyzes the mechanics of spontaneous creation in terms of the cosmogony that is prominent in the text. I also show how psychomorphic descriptions of the cosmos—associated with the process of cosmogenesis—provide an explanation for change and movement in the cosmos as well as a template for idealized human action in the world. Lastly, I (...)
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  25. A Philosophical Translation of the Heng Xian.Erica F. Brindley, Paul R. Goldin & Esther S. Klein - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):145-151.
  26. The Tetrahedron as an Archetype for the Concept of Change in the I Ching.Chappell Brown - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):159-168.
  27. "Seeing" Like a Sage: Three Takes on Identity and Perception in Early China.Miranda Brown & Uffe Bergeton - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):641-662.
  28. Review of Geaney's On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought. [REVIEW]Brian Bruya - 2003 - China Review International 10 (1):157-164.
    This is a full length review in which I discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Jane Geaney's On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought. Geaney's strengths lie in her refusal to import Western epistemological presuppositions into depictions of Early Chinese philosophy, her meticulous canvassing of key Warring States texts, and her insightful reconstruction of Early Chinese epistemology as based on perception rather than abstract concepts. Her weaknesses are the limited range of her representative texts and her occasional (...)
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  29. Qing (情) and Emotion in Early Chinese Thought.Brian Bruya - 2001 - Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:151-176.
    In a 1967 article, A. C. Graham made the claim that 情 qing should never be translated as "emotions" in rendering early Chinese texts into English. Over time, sophisticated translators and interpreters have taken this advice to heart, and qing has come to be interpreted as "the facts" or "what is genuine in one." In these English terms all sense of interrelationality is gone, leaving us with a wooden, objective stasis. But we also know, again partly through the work of (...)
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  30. Communicative Rationality and Inter-Culturality: A Symposium with Jürgen Habermas.Weidong Cao - 2001 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):73-79.
  31. Chinese Philosophy Through a Prism of Its Classical Ontological Conception in the Future Global Context.Marina Čarnogurská - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:157-160.
    The purpose of this paper is to discover an important contribution of classical Chinese ontological conceptions for the future world philosophy and the modern human Weltanschauung in the process of its globalization. Through a brief mosaic of a development of mutual Euro-Chinese encounters, from the Middle Ages to the present, the paper presents the view that both Chinese and European philosophical complexes were quite indispensable parts of the history of world philosophy; and in the future, perhaps, they will be the (...)
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  32. Original Ontological Roots of Ancient Chinese Philosophy.Marina Čarnogurská - 1998 - Asian Philosophy 8 (3):203-213.
    Abstract This is a new attempt at an analysis of classical Chinese (Confucian) ethics which is still inappropriately explained by Western philosophy as a traditional normative ethical system. Special conditions of ancient Chinese anthropogeny and social and economic development gave rise in this cultural region to an original theory of being, which in modern terminology can be referred to as an ontological model of a fundamental Yin?Yang dialectic of a bipolar and non?homogeneous synergy of being. This theory of being became (...)
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  33. Commemoration and Perdurance in the Analects. Books I and II.Edward S. Casey - 1984 - Philosophy East and West 34 (4):389-399.
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  34. Meontology in Early Xuanxue Thought.David Chai - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):90-101.
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  35. Nirvana is Nameless.Chang Chung-Yuan - 1974 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 1 (3‐4):247-274.
  36. Reason and Intuition in Chinese Philosophy.Carsun Chang - 1954 - Philosophy East and West 4 (2):99-112.
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  37. Wang Pi on the Mind.Chung-Yue Chang - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (1):77-106.
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  38. Essays on Skepticism, Relativism, and Ethics in the Zhuangzi. Edited by Paul Kjellberg and Philip J. Ivanhoe. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996. Pp.Xx +240. [REVIEW]Hsiu-Chen Chang - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (2):269-271.
  39. Reflections on Time and Related Ideas in the Yijing.Wonsuk Chang - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (2):pp. 216-229.
    This article reflects on important terms and concepts that constitute the cosmology of the Yijing: ji, tian, yin-yang , and the correlative aspects of temporality. These are familiar terms from the Yijing as well as other philosophical texts from ancient China. It begins with a comparative inquiry into Chinese and Greek attitudes toward time and then explores the related philosophical consequences. Although the ancient Chinese view of the world as temporal, processual, and relational may be found to be in contrast (...)
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  40. Di 帝 and Tian 天 in Ancient Chinese Thought: A Critical Analysis of Hegel's Views.Derong Chen - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):13-27.
    The notions of Di (Emperor), Shangdi (God in heaven), and Tian (Heaven) were endowed with a variety of meanings and were used to refer to different objects of worship in ancient Chinese religion. In different eras, Di referred to the earthly emperor as well as to the heavenly emperor; Tian referred to the physical sky as well as to a supreme personal god in different contexts. Hegel oversimplified these three notions when he characterized ancient Chinese religion as a kind of (...)
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  41. The Origin and Development of Being (Yu) From Non-Being (Wu) in the Tao Te Ching.Ellen Marie Chen - 1973 - International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (3):403-417.
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  42. Nothingness and the Mother Principle in Early Chinese Taoism.Ellen Marie Chen - 1969 - International Philosophical Quarterly 9 (3):391-405.
  43. Cognition, Language, Symbol, and Meaning Making: A Comparative Study of the Epistemic Stances of Whitehead and the Book of Changes.Kuan-Hung Chen - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (3):285-300.
    The epistemic stances of both Whitehead and the Book of Changes are founded on the assumption that process is reality; there are important resonances with respect to perception, meaning and significance. Such a process-oriented approach is productive for developing non-representational and non-dualistic theories in the fields of epistemology, philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. An exploration of these resonances will further provide an appropriate foundation for dialogue between the philosophy of the Book of Changes and that of contemporary Euro-American (...)
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  44. Crisis and Possibility: The Ethical Implication of Contingency.Xunwu Chen - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (3):257 - 268.
    This essay argues that a person's fate is defined by the interaction of necessity and contingency, indicating that a person's existential competence consists of his or her ability to dance well with both necessity and contingency, not merely with either of them. As a result, it rejects the traditional association of fate with fatalism and fatality on the one hand and resists the present current to define individual fate and identity merely in terms of contingency and as contingency on the (...)
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  45. A Rethinking of Confucian Rationality.Xunwu Chen - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):483-504.
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  46. Interpreting Paradigm of Change in Chinese Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):339-367.
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  47. Preface: Unity of Heaven and Man in the Yijing.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):333-334.
  48. On Harmony as Transformation: Paradigms From the Yijing ".Chung-ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):11-36.
  49. Li and Qi in the Yijing.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):73-100.
  50. On Harmony as Transformation: Paradigms From the Yijing.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):11-36.
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