15 found
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  1. From Nativism to Numerology: Yamaga Soko's Final Excursion Into the Metaphysics of Change.John Allen Tucker - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (2):194-217.
    : Most discussions of Yamaga Soko's philosophical development as a Confucian scholar in Tokugawa Japan suggest that in his later years he moved away from Confucianism and toward a religio-philosophical celebration of Japan's supposed uniqueness. It is shown here, however, that Soko's nativism, set forth in his Chucho jijitsu, was later eclipsed by his final philosophical work, the Gengen hakki, wherein he articulated a kind of naturalistic numerology, based vaguely on the Yijing. This shift in Soko's thought can be viewed (...)
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  2.  43
    Review of Original Tao: Inward Training and the Foundations of Taoist Mysticism by Harold D. Roth. [REVIEW]John Allen Tucker - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):307-310.
  3.  21
    Quiet-Sitting and Political Activism.John Allen Tucker - 2002 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (1-2):1-2.
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  4.  26
    A.S. Cua, The Unity of Knowledge and Action: A Study of Wang Yang-Ming's Moral Psychology, University Press of Hawaii, Honolulu, 1982 (12.95, 133pp.). [REVIEW]John Allen Tucker - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (1):97-100.
  5.  19
    Art, the Ethical Self, and Political Eremitism: Fujiwara Seika's Essay on Landscape Painting.John Allen Tucker - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):47-63.
  6.  14
    Two Mencian Political Notions in Tokugawa Japan.John Allen Tucker - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (2):233-253.
    Two Mencian political notions are examined: rebellion against tyranny and righteous martyrdom, as explored theoretically by prominent Japanese scholars of the Tokugawa period (1603-1867). It is argued here generally that Confucianism, as represented by the Mencius, was more than a feudal ideology legitimizing the hegemony of Tokugawa shoguns, since these two Mencian notions were advocated and/or opposed by both supporters and opponents of the Tokugawa regime. In the development of this argument, it is also revealed that the two notions were (...)
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  7.  18
    Chen Beixi, Lu Xiangshan, and Early Tokugawa (1600-1867) Philosophical Lexicography.John Allen Tucker - 1993 - Philosophy East and West 43 (4):683-713.
  8.  14
    Dai Zhen and the Japanese School of Ancient Learning.John Allen Tucker - 1991 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):411-440.
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  9.  8
    Hoyt Cleveland Tillman, Utilitarian Confucianism: Ch'en Liang's Challenge to Chu Hsi, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1982, 304pp. [REVIEW]John Allen Tucker - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (1):89-92.
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  10.  6
    Reappraising Razan: The Legacy of Philosophical Lexicography.John Allen Tucker - 1992 - Asian Philosophy 2 (1):41 – 60.
  11.  3
    Review By.John Allen Tucker - unknown
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  12. Antonio S. Cua, "The Unity of Knowledge and Action: A Study of Wang Yang-Ming's Moral Psychology". [REVIEW]John Allen Tucker - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (1):97.
  13. Confucianism and Human Rights in Meiji Japan.John Allen Tucker - 2008 - In Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.), The Imperative of Understanding: Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, and Onto-Hermeneutics: A Tribute Volume Dedicated to Professor Chung-Ying Cheng. Global Scholarly Publications.
  14. Hoyt Cleveland Tillman, "Utilitarian Confucianism: Ch'en Liang's Challenge to Chu Hsi". [REVIEW]John Allen Tucker - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (1):89.
     
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  15. Pei-Hsi's "Tzu-I" and the Rise of Tokugawa Philosophical Lexicography.John Allen Tucker - 1990 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    This study traces the impact of Ch'en Pei-hsi's Hsing-li tzu-i on the rise of philosophical lexicography in Tokugawa Japan . It suggests that the appearance of copies of the 1553 Korean edition of Pei-hsi's Tzu-i, brought to Japan in the wake of Toyotomi Hideyoshi's invasion of Korea , crucially influenced both understandings of and reactions to Neo-Confucianism in Tokugawa Japan. Pei-hsi's Tzu-i, the study relates, served as the literary template for several early Tokugawa works, including Fujiwara Seika's Kana seiri , (...)
     
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