27 found
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  1.  56
    Crime and Culpability: A Theory of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive overview of what the criminal law would look like if organised around the principle that those who deserve punishment should receive punishment commensurate with, but no greater than, that which they deserve. Larry Alexander and Kimberly Kessler Ferzan argue that desert is a function of the actor's culpability, and that culpability is a function of the risks of harm to protected interests that the actor believes he is imposing and his reasons for acting in the (...)
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  2. Psychopathy and Criminal Responsibility.Stephen J. Morse - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (3):205-212.
    This article considers whether psychopaths should be held criminally responsible. After describing the positive law of criminal responsibility in general and as it applies to psychopaths, it suggests that psychopaths lack moral rationality and that severe psychopaths should be excused from crimes that violate the moral rights of others. Alternative forms of social control for dangerous psychopaths, such as involuntary civil commitment, are considered, and the potential legal implications of future scientific understanding of psychopathy are addressed.
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  3. Moral and Legal Responsibility and the New Neuroscience.Stephen J. Morse - 2005 - In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4.  54
    Voluntary Control of Behavior and Responsibility.Stephen J. Morse - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):12 – 13.
  5.  34
    Hooked on Hype: Addiction and Responsibility. [REVIEW]Stephen J. Morse - 2000 - Law and Philosophy 19 (1):3 - 49.
  6.  80
    Genetics and Criminal Responsibility.Stephen J. Morse - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (9):378-380.
  7.  8
    Brain Imaging in the Courtroom: The Quest for Legal Relevance.Stephen J. Morse - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (2):24-27.
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  8.  47
    Neither Desert nor Disease.Stephen J. Morse - 1999 - Legal Theory 5 (3):265-309.
  9.  27
    Preventive Confinement of Dangerous Offenders.Stephen J. Morse - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):56-72.
  10.  41
    A Good Enough Reason: Addiction, Agency and Criminal Responsibility.Stephen J. Morse - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (5):490 - 518.
    ABSTRACT The article begins by contrasting medical and moral views of addiction and how such views influence responsibility and policy analysis. It suggests that since addiction always involves action and action can always be morally evaluated, we must independently decide whether addicts do not meet responsibility criteria rather than begging the question and deciding by the label of ?disease? or ?moral weakness?. It then turns to the criteria for criminal responsibility and shows that the criteria for criminal responsibility, like the (...)
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  11.  8
    Preventive Confinement of Dangerous Offenders.Stephen J. Morse - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):56-72.
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  12.  7
    Hooked on Hype: Addiction and Responsibility.Stephen J. Morse - 2000 - Law and Philosophy 19 (1):3-49.
  13.  22
    Diminished Capacity, Neuroscience, and Just Punishment.Stephen J. Morse - 2012 - In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press. pp. 155.
  14.  3
    Against the Received Wisdom: Why the Criminal Justice System Should Give Kids a Break.Stephen J. Morse - 2020 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 14 (2):257-271.
    Professor Gideon Yaffe’s recent, intricately argued book, The Age of Culpability: Children and the Nature of Criminal Responsibility, argues against the nearly uniform position in both law and scholarship that the criminal justice system should give juveniles a break because on average they have different capacities relevant to responsibility than adults. Professor Yaffe instead argues that kid should be given a break because juveniles have little say about the criminal law, primarily because they do not have a vote. For Professor (...)
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  15.  9
    Psychopathy and the Law: The United States Experience.Stephen J. Morse - 2010 - In Luca Malatesti & John McMillan (eds.), Responsibility and Psychopathy: Interfacing Law, Psychiatry and Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. pp. 41.
  16.  28
    The “New Syndrome Excuse Syndrome”.Stephen J. Morse - 1995 - Criminal Justice Ethics 14 (1):3-15.
  17. Neuroethics.Stephen J. Morse - 2008 - In Sidney Bloch & Stephen A. Green (eds.), Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  18.  6
    Editors’ Introduction.Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse - 2016 - In Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (eds.), Legal, Moral, and Metaphysical Truths: The Philosophy of Michael S. Moore. Oxford University Press UK.
    This brief festschrift introduction does not attempt to review and characterize Michael Moore’s extraordinary and influential immense body of scholarship at the intersections of law, morality, and metaphysics. This is done most ably by Heidi Hurd in the following chapter. Here we simply describe each of the contributions to this volume as they relate to the body of Moore’s work, virtually every aspect of which is addressed by the various authors. The introduction concludes with personal last words by the editors (...)
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  19.  15
    Michael Pardo and Dennis Patterson, Minds, Brains, and Law: The Conceptual Foundations of Law and Neuroscience.Stephen J. Morse - 2016 - Jurisprudence 7 (1):158-163.
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  20.  7
    New Therapies, Old Problems, or, A Plea for Neuromodesty.Stephen J. Morse - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (1):60-64.
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  21.  7
    Book ReviewsSusan A. Bandes,, Ed. The Passions of Law.New York: New York University Press, 1999. Pp. 367. $55.00 ; $22.50. [REVIEW]Stephen J. Morse - 2004 - Ethics 114 (3):601-603.
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  22.  2
    Moore on the Mind.Stephen J. Morse - 2016 - In Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (eds.), Legal, Moral, and Metaphysical Truths: The Philosophy of Michael S. Moore. Oxford University Press UK.
    This chapter addresses the many topics concerning the mind that Michael Moore has written about for many decades, including the metaphysics of mind and action, the act requirement in criminal law, the basis for the excuse of legal insanity, a volitional or control excuse, and the relation of the new neuroscience to law. Rather than primarily responding to Moore’s influential work, the chapter largely considers issues that are complementary to Moore’s work. The chapter does question whether metaphysical issues must be (...)
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  23.  9
    Susan A. Bandes, Ed., The Passions of Law:The Passions of Law.Stephen J. Morse - 2004 - Ethics 114 (3):601-603.
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  24. Legal, Moral, and Metaphysical Truths: The Philosophy of Michael S. Moore.Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Perhaps more than any other scholar, Michael Moore has argued that there are deep and necessary connections between metaphysics, morality, and law. Moore has developed every contour of a theory of criminal law, from philosophy of action to a theory of causation. Indeed, not only is he the central figure in retributive punishment but his moral realist position places him at the center of many jurisprudential debates. Comprised of essays by leading scholars, this volume discusses and challenges the work of (...)
     
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  25. Neuroscience and Criminal Law: Perils and Promises.Stephen J. Morse - 2019 - In Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Applied Ethics and the Criminal Law. Springer Verlag. pp. 471-496.
    This chapter addresses the potential contributions of neuroscience to criminal justice decision-making and policy, with special emphasis on criminal responsibility. The central question is whether neuroscience is relevant to criminal justice. The general conclusion is that it is scarcely useful at present but may become more relevant as the science progresses. After explaining the meaning of criminal responsibility in use, the chapter speculates about the source of claims for the positive influence of neuroscience. The scientific status of behavioral neuroscience and (...)
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  26. Stephen J. Morse.Stephen J. Morse - 1999 - Legal Theory 5 (3):265-309.
     
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  27. The Promise of Neuroscience for Law: Hope or Hype?Stephen J. Morse - 2018 - In David Boonin, Katrina L. Sifferd, Tyler K. Fagan, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Michael Huemer, Daniel Wodak, Derk Pereboom, Stephen J. Morse, Sarah Tyson, Mark Zelcer, Garrett VanPelt, Devin Casey, Philip E. Devine, David K. Chan, Maarten Boudry, Christopher Freiman, Hrishikesh Joshi, Shelley Wilcox, Jason Brennan, Eric Wiland, Ryan Muldoon, Mark Alfano, Philip Robichaud, Kevin Timpe, David Livingstone Smith, Francis J. Beckwith, Dan Hooley, Russell Blackford, John Corvino, Corey McCall, Dan Demetriou, Ajume Wingo, Michael Shermer, Ole Martin Moen, Aksel Braanen Sterri, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Jeppe von Platz, John Thrasher, Mary Hawkesworth, William MacAskill, Daniel Halliday, Janine O’Flynn, Yoaav Isaacs, Jason Iuliano, Claire Pickard, Arvin M. Gouw, Tina Rulli, Justin Caouette, Allen Habib, Brian D. Earp, Andrew Vierra, Subrena E. Smith, Danielle M. Wenner, Lisa Diependaele, Sigrid Sterckx, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Harisan Unais Nasir, Udo Schuklenk, Benjamin Zolf & Woolwine (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Springer Verlag. pp. 77-96.
    This chapter addresses the potential contributions of neuroscience to legal policy in general and criminal justice in particular. The central question is whether neuroscience is relevant to legal policy. The chapter begins with speculation about the source of claims for the positive influence of neuroscience. It then turns to the scientific status of behavioral neuroscience. The next section considers the two radical challenges to current policies that neuroscience allegedly poses: determinism and the death of agency. The penultimate section addresses the (...)
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