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  1. Kimberly W. Benston (1993). The Veil of Black: (Un)Masking the Subject of African-American Modernism's “Native Son”. Human Studies 16 (1-2):69 - 99.
  2. D. Brackett (2003). What a Difference a Name Makes : Two Instances of African-American Popular Music. In Martin Clayton, Trevor Herbert & Richard Middleton (eds.), The Cultural Study of Music: A Critical Introduction. Routledge.
  3. Tommy J. Curry (2009). I'm Too Real For Yah. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):61-77.
    I am interested in looking at Krumpin’ through what I am calling the “politics of submergence.” If my world is chaotic, if my Blackness is my murderer, can I be expected to create beauty? Can my art be transformative? My paper argues that Krumpin’ is in fact transformative, not to the extent that it perpetuates hope, but maintains its social pessimism. In accepting both the conditions that have sustained the racial marginalization of African descended people, and the impotence of this (...)
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  4. Dan Flory (2000). Black on White: Film Noir and the Epistemology of Race in Recent African American Cinema. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (1):82–116.
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  5. Eddie S. Glaude (2007). In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America. University of Chicago Press.
    In this timely book, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., one of our nation’s rising young African American intellectuals, makes an impassioned plea for black America to address its social problems by recourse to experience and with an eye set on the promise and potential of the future, rather than the fixed ideas and categories of the past. Central to Glaude’s mission is a rehabilitation of philosopher John Dewey, whose ideas, he argues, can be fruitfully applied to a renewal of African American (...)
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  6. Leonard Harris (2004). The Great Debate: W. E. B. Du Bois Vs. Alain Locke on the Aesthetic. Philosophia Africana 7 (1):15-39.
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  7. Robin James (2011). &Quot;these.Are.The Breaks&Quot;: Rethinking "Disagreement" Through Hip Hop. Transformations (19).
    In this paper, I argue that it is productive to read Rancière’s theory of political practice – what he calls “disagreement” – with and against Kodwo Eshun’s theorization of hip hop. Thinking disagreement through hip hop helps flesh out how, exactly, disagreement works, particularly at the level of individual embodiment and consciousness. While Rancière himself gives us many examples of interruptions to the political body (the demos speaking, Jean Derion asserting the non-universality of “universal” man, etc.), I am interested in (...)
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  8. Richard A. Jones (2009). The Politics of Black Fictive Space. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):391-418.
    Historically, for Black writers, literary fiction has been a site for transforming the discursive disciplinary spaces of political oppression. From 19th century “slave narratives” to the 20th century, Black novelists have created an impressive literary counter-canon in advancing liberatory struggles. W.E.B. Du Bois argued that “all art is political.” Many Black writers have used fiction to create spaces for political and social freedom—from the early work of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black (1859)—to (...)
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