Search results for 'Anthropology, Cultural' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael J. Kral (2007). Psychology and Anthropology: Intersubjectivity and Epistemology in an Interpretive Cultural Science. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27 (2-1):257-275.score: 120.0
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  2. Ana Elena Ilinca (2010). Alina Branda, Repere în antropologia culturalã/ Orientations in Cultural Anthropology. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (5):214-216.score: 120.0
    Alina Branda, Repere în antropologia culturalã Ed. Fundatiei pentru Studii Europene, Cluj-Napoca, 2002, 272p.
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  3. Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland (2006). Towards a Unified Science of Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):329-347.score: 108.0
    We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a good (...)
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  4. Stephanie A. Fryberg (2012). Cultural Psychology as a Bridge Between Anthropology and Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):437-444.score: 108.0
    The theory and methods of cultural psychology begin with the assumption that psychological processes are socioculturally and historically grounded. As such, they offer a new approach for understanding the diversity of human functioning because they (a) question the presumed neutrality of the majority group perspective; (b) take the target’s point-of-view (i.e., what it means to be a person in a particular context); (c) assume that there is more than one viable way of being a competent or effective person; and (...)
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  5. Scott Atran (1998). Folk Biology and the Anthropology of Science: Cognitive Universals and Cultural Particulars. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):547-569.score: 102.0
    This essay in the is about how cognition constrains culture in producing science. The example is folk biology, whose cultural recurrence issues from the very same domain-specific cognitive universals that provide the historical backbone of systematic biology. Humans everywhere think about plants and animals in highly structured ways. People have similar folk-biological taxonomies composed of essence-based, species-like groups and the ranking of species into lower- and higher-order groups. Such taxonomies are not as arbitrary in structure and content, nor as (...)
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  6. Maria Kronfeldner (2009). If There is Nothing Beyond the Organic...: Heredity and Culture at the Boundaries of Anthropology in the Work of Alfred L. Kroeber. [REVIEW] NTM - Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine 17 (2):107-134.score: 96.0
    Continuing Franz Boas' work to establish anthropology as an academic discipline in the US at the turn of the twentieth century, Alfred L. Kroeber re-defined culture as a phenomenon sui generis. To achieve this he asked geneticists to enter into a coalition against hereditarian thoughts prevalent at that time in the US. The goal was to create space for anthropology as a separate discipline within academia, distinct from other disciplines. To this end he crossed the boundary separating anthropology from biology (...)
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  7. R. G. Collingwood (2005). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood (1889-1943) on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their (...)
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  8. C. Allibert (2008). Austronesian Migration and the Establishment of the Malagasy Civilization: Contrasted Readings in Linguistics, Archaeology, Genetics and Cultural Anthropology. Diogenes 55 (2):7 - 16.score: 96.0
    This article reviews and contrasts research findings in a variety of disciplines seeking corroboration for theories of settlement in Madagascar. Evidence is considered from the fields of linguistics, archaeology (studies of pottery), cultural anthropology and genetic analysis, leading to conclusions broadly supporting the thesis of Austronesian migrations directly to Madagascar from Kalimantan and Sulawesi around the 5th and 7th centuries CE, which combined with a Bantu group originating from the region of Mozambique. The article nevertheless warns against attributing too (...)
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  9. James Davies (2011). Positive and Negative Models of Suffering: An Anthropology of Our Shifting Cultural Consciousness of Emotional Discontent. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):188-208.score: 96.0
    I explore how many within modern industrial societies currently understand, manage, and respond to their emotional suffering. I argue that this understanding and management of suffering has radically altered in the last 30 years, creating a new model of suffering, “the negative model” (suffering is purposeless), which has largely replaced the “positive model” (suffering is purposeful) that prevailed in the 18th and 19th centuries. This shift has been hastened by what I call the “rationalization of suffering”—namely, the process by which (...)
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  10. Sharon Macdonald (2010). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (4):731-735.score: 96.0
    (2010). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 18, No. 4, pp. 731-735.
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  11. Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller (2011). The Cultural Constitution of Cognition: Taking the Anthropological Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 96.0
    To what extent is cognition affected by culture? And how might cognitive science profit from an intensified collaboration with anthropology in exploring this issue? In order to answer these questions, we will first give a brief description of different perspectives on cognition, one that prevails in most cognitive sciences—particularly in cognitive psychology—and one in anthropology. Three basic assumptions of cognitive science regarding the separability of content and process, the context-independence of processing, and the culture-independence of processing will then be discussed. (...)
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  12. Emma Cohen, Emily Burdett, Nicola Knight & Justin Barrett (2011). Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences in Person-Body Reasoning: Experimental Evidence From the United Kingdom and Brazilian Amazon. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1282-1304.score: 90.0
    We report the results of a cross-cultural investigation of person-body reasoning in the United Kingdom and northern Brazilian Amazon (Marajó Island). The study provides evidence that directly bears upon divergent theoretical claims in cognitive psychology and anthropology, respectively, on the cognitive origins and cross-cultural incidence of mind-body dualism. In a novel reasoning task, we found that participants across the two sample populations parsed a wide range of capacities similarly in terms of the capacities’ perceived anchoring to bodily function. (...)
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  13. Wendy James (ed.) (1995). The Pursuit of Certainty: Religious and Cultural Formulations. Routledge.score: 90.0
    The peoples of the world are now facing movement, mixing and displacement on a larger scale than ever before. We are witness to the rise of new forms of ethnic, cultural and religious identity. Those based in the highly developed countries can extend global influence through wealth and sophisticated technology. Anthropology has inherited a tradition of tolerance and cross-cultural understanding: what light can it throw on the new pursuit of truth? With contributions from leading anthropologists from Germany, the (...)
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  14. Mariella Combi (1992). The Imaginary, the Computer, Artificial Intelligence: A Cultural Anthropological Approach. [REVIEW] AI and Society 6 (1):41-49.score: 90.0
    The role of the cultural anthropologist in studying the results of information technology and artificial intelligence should be to contribute and reaffirm a sense of life which considers the human being in his or her totality, and to recognize the role of diversity and the imaginary. Technical revolutions have also proved to be cultural revolutions.The skills required by one culture, the identification and creation of problems and the solutions are interrelated. These interrelationships are worked out in a (...) context endowed with its own experiences, knowledge and needs which define and make it different from other societies. The advanced technologies require new competences and new skills.This paper examines imaginary from two different viewpoints: (a) the imaginary aspect of body-mind relations, influenced by research into artificial intelligence and its prospects for the future; and (b) the roles and forms assumed by the imaginary in human-computer relations. (shrink)
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  15. Christian Lotz (2005). From Nature to Culture? Diogenes and Philosophical Anthropology. Human Studies 28 (1):41 - 56.score: 84.0
    This essay is concerned with the central issue of philosophical anthropology: the relation between nature and culture. Although Rousseau was the first thinker to introduce this topic within the modern discourse of philosophy and the cultural sciences, it has its origin in Diogenes the Cynic, who was a disciple of Socrates. In my essay I (1) historically introduce a few aspects of philosophical anthropology, (2) deal with the nature–culture exchange, as introduced in Kant, then I (3) relate this topic (...)
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  16. Frank Kressing, Matthis Krischel & Heiner Fangerau (2014). The 'Global Phylogeny' and its Historical Legacy: A Critical Review of a Unified Theory of Human Biological and Linguistic Co-Evolution. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):15-27.score: 84.0
    In a critical review of late twentieth-century gene-culture co-evolutionary models labelled as ‘global phylogeny’, the authors present evidence for the long legacy of co-evolutionary theories in European-based thinking, highlighting that (1) ideas of social and cultural evolution preceded the idea of biological evolution, (2) linguistics played a dominant role in the formation of a unified theory of human co-evolution, and (3) that co-evolutionary thinking was only possible due to perpetuated and renewed transdisciplinary reticulations between scholars of different disciplines—especially within (...)
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  17. John B. Gatewood (2012). Cultural Models, Consensus Analysis, and the Social Organization of Knowledge. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):362-371.score: 84.0
    The introductory essay to this collection correctly observes that there are many “challenges for rapprochement” between anthropology and (the rest of) cognitive science. Still, the possibilities of fruitful interchanges provide some hope for the parties getting back together, at least on an intermittent basis. This response offers some views concerning the “incompatibility” of psychology and anthropology, reviews why cognitive anthropology drifted away from cognitive science, and notes two areas of contemporary interest within cognitive anthropology that may lead to a re-engagement.
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  18. Anne-Marie E. Cantwell, Eva Friedlander & Madeleine Lorch Tramm (eds.) (2000). Ethics and Anthropology: Facing Future Issues in Human Biology, Globalism, and Cultural Property. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 84.0
     
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  19. Curtiss Hoffman (2011). Introductory Overview of Archaeology's and Cultural Anthropology's Shifting Paradigms. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):69-71.score: 78.0
  20. Micaela Di Leonardo (1998). Exotics at Home: Anthropologies, Others, American Modernity. University of Chicago Press.score: 78.0
    In this pathbreaking study, Micaela di Leonardo reveals the face of power within the mask of cultural difference. From the 1893 World's Fair to Body Shop advertisements, di Leonardo focuses on the intimate and shifting relations between popular portrayals of exotic Others and the practice of anthropology. In so doing, she casts new light on gender, race, and the public sphere in America's past and present. "An impressive work of scholarship that is mordantly witty, passionately argued, and takes no (...)
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  21. Moral Willing & As Narrative (2010). It is No Easy Job to Situate a Discus-Sion of the Will Within Anthropology, Which is Perhaps Why the Editors of This Volume Chose the Title They Did. It is a Subject Some of Us Might Want to Move Toward, but There is No Sense of Arrival. Even the Paths Toward It Are Dauntingly Elusive. One is Either Faced with Too Much Relevant Literature or Too Little. On the Too Little Side, There has Been Scant Explicit Consideration of Willing as a Cultural Phenomenon, in Contrast to Philosophy and Psychology Where ... [REVIEW] In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press. 50.score: 78.0
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  22. Nils Goldschmidt & Bernd Remmele (2005). Anthropology as the Basic Science of Economic Theory: Towards a Cultural Theory of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (3):455-469.score: 78.0
    Economics and culture are in a complex, developing relation to each other. Yet, to introduce ?culture? into economic theory requires, first of all, an appropriate understanding of culture itself. The crucial point of this paper is that culture in its development and structure is only understandable if one considers it in connection with the autonomous structural development of the forms with which the subjects experience and construct their world. In recognition of the socio?cultural organization of human society, there is (...)
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  23. Harvey Whitehouse & Emma Cohen (2012). Seeking a Rapprochement Between Anthropology and the Cognitive Sciences: A Problem-Driven Approach. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):404-412.score: 78.0
    Beller, Bender, and Medin question the necessity of including social anthropology within the cognitive sciences. We argue that there is great scope for fruitful rapprochement while agreeing that there are obstacles (even if we might wish to debate some of those specifically identified by Beller and colleagues). We frame the general problem differently, however: not in terms of the problem of reconciling disciplines and research cultures, but rather in terms of the prospects for collaborative deployment of expertise (methodological and theoretical) (...)
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  24. Janet LeValley (1997). Doing It in Cyberspace: Cultural Sensitivity in Applied Anthropology. Anthropology of Consciousness 8 (4):113-132.score: 78.0
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  25. Amanda Ravetz (2007). From Documenting Culture to Experimenting with Cultural Phenomena: Using Fine Art Pedagogies with Visual Anthropology Students. In Elizabeth Hallam & Tim Ingold (eds.), Creativity and Cultural Improvisation. Berg. 44.score: 78.0
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  26. Rabindra Ray (2010). In the European Shadow: Further Essays in a Philosophical Anthropology. Yash Publications.score: 78.0
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  27. Rabindra Ray (2005). Living with Difference: Essays in a Philosophical Anthropology. Yash Publications.score: 78.0
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  28. Douglass Price Williams (1996). Dreamwork, Anthropology and the Curing Professions: A Cultural Approach to Dreamwork. Anthropology of Consciousness 7 (2):35-36.score: 78.0
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  29. Nicholas Thomas (1999). Becoming Undisciplined: Anthropology and Cultural Studies. In Henrietta L. Moore (ed.), Anthropological Theory Today. Polity Press. 262--279.score: 74.0
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  30. Peter Johnson (2006). Review of R.G. Collingwood, An Essay on Philosophical Method; the Philosophy of Enchantment, Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).score: 72.0
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  31. Karen Fog Olwig & Kirsten Hastrup (eds.) (1997). Siting Culture: The Shifting Anthropological Object. Routledge.score: 72.0
    The idea of culture has been subject to critical debate in anthropology during the past decade as the result of a shift in emphasis from the bounded local culture to transnational cultural flows. But at the very same time that cultural mobility is being emphasized by anthropologists, the people they study are recasting culture as a place of belonging as they construct local identities. Siting Culture argues that it is only through rich ethnographic studies that anthropologists may explore (...)
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  32. Eugene T. Gadol (1974). The Idealistic Foundations of Cultural Anthropology: Vico, Kant and Cassirer. Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (2):207-225.score: 72.0
  33. Regula Valérie Burri & Joseph Dumit (eds.) (2007). Biomedicine as Culture: Instrumental Practices, Technoscientific Knowledge, and New Modes of Life. Routledge.score: 72.0
    This volume offers interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary biomedicine as a cultural practice.
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  34. H. Clark Barrett, Stephen Stich & Stephen Laurence (2012). Should the Study of Homo Sapiens Be Part of Cognitive Science? Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):379-386.score: 72.0
    Beller, Bender, and Medin argue that a reconciliation between anthropology and cognitive science seems unlikely. We disagree. In our view, Beller et al.’s view of the scope of what anthropology can offer cognitive science is too narrow. In focusing on anthropology’s role in elucidating cultural particulars, they downplay the fact that anthropology can reveal both variation and universals in human cognition, and is in a unique position to do so relative to the other subfields of cognitive science. Indeed, without (...)
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  35. Trevor H. J. Marchand (ed.) (2011). Making Knowledge: Explorations of the Indissoluble Relation Between Mind, Body and Environment. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 72.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface (Trevor H.J. Marchand, School of Oriental and African Studies). -- Introduction: Making knowledge: explorations of the indissoluble relation between minds, bodies, and environment (Trevor H.J. Marchand, School of Oriental and African Studies). -- 1. 'Practice without theory': a neuroanthropological perspective on embodied learning (Greg Downey, Macquarie University). -- 2. Learning to listen: auscultation and the transmission of auditory knowledge (Tom Rice, University of Exeter). -- 3. The craft of skilful learning: Kazakh women's everyday craft practices (...)
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  36. Haskell M. Block (1952). Cultural Anthropology and Contemporary Literary Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 11 (1):46-54.score: 72.0
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  37. Stephen Nugent (1994). Reviews : George Marcus (Ed.), Rereading Cultural Anthropology. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 1992, 403 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (4):119-121.score: 72.0
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  38. Hermann Wein (1957). Trends in Philosophical Anthropology and Cultural Anthropology in Postwar Germany. Philosophy of Science 24 (1):46-56.score: 72.0
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  39. A. K. Saran (1956). Book Review:Cultural Anthropology. Melville J. Herskovits. [REVIEW] Ethics 67 (1):64-.score: 72.0
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  40. Arthur Child (1949). Book Review:Man and His Works: The Science of Cultural Anthropology. Melville J. Herskovits. [REVIEW] Ethics 59 (3):222-.score: 72.0
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  41. F. A. Hanson (1989). Book Reviews : Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences. By George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fischer. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1986. Pp. Xiii + 205. $22.00. Reason and Morality. Edited by Joanna Overing. ASA Monographs 24. London and New York: Tavistock Publications, 1985. Pp. X + 277. $35.00 (Cloth), $15.95 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (2):237-241.score: 72.0
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  42. Thomas McCarthy (1992). Doing the Right Thing in Cross-Cultural Representation:The Predicament of Culture. James Clifford; Writing Culture. James Clifford, George E. Marcus; Works and Lives. Clifford Geertz; Anthropology as Cultural Critique. George E. Marcus, Michael M. J. Fischer. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (3):635-.score: 72.0
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  43. John M. Cooper (1936). An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. Thought 11 (1):131-134.score: 72.0
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  44. Michael Ghiselin (2003). Essay Reviews: The Failure of Cultural Anthropology to Assimilate Darwinism. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):283-290.score: 72.0
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  45. Paul Diener (1984). Humanism and Science in Cultural Anthropology: The Great Protein Fiasco. Journal of Social Philosophy 15 (1):13-20.score: 72.0
  46. Guiseppina D'Oro (2013). Understanding Others: Cultural Anthropology with Collingwood and Quine. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):326-345.score: 72.0
  47. John Hast Weakland (1951). Method in Cultural Anthropology. Philosophy of Science 18 (1):55-69.score: 72.0
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  48. Javier San Martin (1997). Husserl and Cultural Anthropology Commentary on Husserl's Letter to Levy-Bruhl. Recherches Husserliennes 7:87-116.score: 72.0
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  49. J. J. Williams (1934). Cultural Anthropology. Thought 9 (1):170-172.score: 72.0
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  50. Kathryn Linn Geurts (2002). On Rocks, Walks, and Talks In West Africa: Cultural Categories and an Anthropology of the Senses. Ethos 30 (3):178-198.score: 72.0
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