Search results for 'Anthropology, Cultural' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Melford E. Spiro (1986). Cultural Relativism and the Future of Anthropology. Cultural Anthropology 1 (3):259-286.
  2.  13
    Michael J. Kral (2007). Psychology and Anthropology: Intersubjectivity and Epistemology in an Interpretive Cultural Science. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27 (2-1):257-275.
    Psychology has been a deductive science where theory and hypotheses precede investigation of new knowledge. Data inform theory which then leads to more refined hypotheses. The recent move toward a cultural psychology calls for an unfurling of this perspective. This involves consideration of an epistemology at the core of anthropology, a shift toward first-person points of view, where ethnography is the inductive method based on a practical philosophy. This paper examines what is at stake for psychology to enter the (...)
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  3.  2
    Ana Elena Ilinca (2010). Alina Branda, Repere în antropologia culturalã/ Orientations in Cultural Anthropology. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (5):214-216.
    Alina Branda, Repere în antropologia culturalã Ed. Fundatiei pentru Studii Europene, Cluj-Napoca, 2002, 272p.
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  4.  36
    Stephanie A. Fryberg (2012). Cultural Psychology as a Bridge Between Anthropology and Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):437-444.
    The theory and methods of cultural psychology begin with the assumption that psychological processes are socioculturally and historically grounded. As such, they offer a new approach for understanding the diversity of human functioning because they (a) question the presumed neutrality of the majority group perspective; (b) take the target’s point-of-view (i.e., what it means to be a person in a particular context); (c) assume that there is more than one viable way of being a competent or effective person; and (...)
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  5. Scott Atran (1998). Folk Biology and the Anthropology of Science: Cognitive Universals and Cultural Particulars. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):547-569.
    This essay in the is about how cognition constrains culture in producing science. The example is folk biology, whose cultural recurrence issues from the very same domain-specific cognitive universals that provide the historical backbone of systematic biology. Humans everywhere think about plants and animals in highly structured ways. People have similar folk-biological taxonomies composed of essence-based, species-like groups and the ranking of species into lower- and higher-order groups. Such taxonomies are not as arbitrary in structure and content, nor as (...)
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  6. R. G. Collingwood (2005). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Oxford University Press.
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood (1889-1943) on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their (...)
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  7.  21
    James Davies (2011). Positive and Negative Models of Suffering: An Anthropology of Our Shifting Cultural Consciousness of Emotional Discontent. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):188-208.
    I explore how many within modern industrial societies currently understand, manage, and respond to their emotional suffering. I argue that this understanding and management of suffering has radically altered in the last 30 years, creating a new model of suffering, “the negative model” (suffering is purposeless), which has largely replaced the “positive model” (suffering is purposeful) that prevailed in the 18th and 19th centuries. This shift has been hastened by what I call the “rationalization of suffering”—namely, the process by which (...)
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  8.  23
    C. Allibert (2008). Austronesian Migration and the Establishment of the Malagasy Civilization: Contrasted Readings in Linguistics, Archaeology, Genetics and Cultural Anthropology. Diogenes 55 (2):7 - 16.
    This article reviews and contrasts research findings in a variety of disciplines seeking corroboration for theories of settlement in Madagascar. Evidence is considered from the fields of linguistics, archaeology (studies of pottery), cultural anthropology and genetic analysis, leading to conclusions broadly supporting the thesis of Austronesian migrations directly to Madagascar from Kalimantan and Sulawesi around the 5th and 7th centuries CE, which combined with a Bantu group originating from the region of Mozambique. The article nevertheless warns against attributing too (...)
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  9.  8
    Heda Festini (2008). Some Types of Philosophical and Cultural Anthropology. Synthesis Philosophica 23 (1):17-24.
    The aim is to offer a fundamental outline of a human being, which could be the backbone of the conception of open culture. By analyzing the focal points of philosophical and cultural anthropology: A) philosophical anthropology : a) passivist conception, b) activist conception; B) cultural anthropology : a) closed culture, b) open culture; we must ensure the conception of an open vs. the closed culture. In multicultural associations, it would seem that the latter often hinders progress, so it (...)
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  10.  6
    Sharon Macdonald (2010). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (4):731-735.
    (2010). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 18, No. 4, pp. 731-735.
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  11. Scott Atran, Folkbiology and the Anthropology of Science: Cognitive Universals and Cultural Particulars.
    This essay in the "anthropology of science" is about how cognition constrains culture in producing science. The example is folk biology, whose cultural recurrence issues from the very same domain-specific cognitive universals that provide the historical backbone of systematic biology. Humans everywhere think about plants and animals in highly structured ways. People have similar folk-biological taxonomies composed of essence-based species-like groups and the ranking of species into lower- and higher-order groups. Such taxonomies are not as arbitrary in structure and (...)
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  12. David Boucher, Wendy James & Philip Smallwood (eds.) (2004). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. OUP Oxford.
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their various (...)
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  13. David Boucher, Wendy James & Philip Smallwood (eds.) (2004). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Clarendon Press.
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their various (...)
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  14. Lester Embree, Cultural Anthropology in Schutzian Perspective. Phainomena 74.
    Alfred Schutz’s scattered remarks about cultural anthropology can be related to the rubrics of disciplinary definition, basic concepts, and distinctive methods and also to his notion of the theoretical level in social science by consulting current textbooks. This shows a way in which a theory of this particular science can be developed that would fit into a general Schutzian Wissenschaftslehre of the cultural sciences.
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  15. R. G. Collingwood (2005). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R. G. Collingwood on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the centre of the book are six chapters of a study of folktale and magic, composed by Collingwood in the mid-1930s and intended for development into a book. Here Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of (...)
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  16. R. G. Collingwood (2005). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the centre of the book are six chapters of a study of folktale and magic, composed by Collingwood in the mid-1930s and intended for development into a book. Here Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human (...)
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  17. Anne-Marie E. Cantwell, Eva Friedlander & Madeleine Lorch Tramm (eds.) (2000). Ethics and Anthropology: Facing Future Issues in Human Biology, Globalism, and Cultural Property. New York Academy of Sciences.
     
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  18. Kathryn Linn Geurts (2002). On Rocks, Walks, and Talks In West Africa: Cultural Categories and an Anthropology of the Senses. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 30 (3):178-198.
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  19.  58
    Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland (2006). Towards a Unified Science of Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):329-347.
    We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a good (...)
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  20.  4
    Nancy C. Lutkehaus (2008). Putting “Culture” Into Cultural Psychology: Anthropology's Role in the Development of Bruner's Cultural Psychology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 36 (1):46-59.
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  21.  2
    Naomi Quinn (2004). Psychodynamic Universals, Cultural Particulars in Feminist Anthropology: Rethinking Hua Gender Beliefs. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 32 (4):493-513.
  22.  9
    Nils Goldschmidt & Bernd Remmele (2005). Anthropology as the Basic Science of Economic Theory: Towards a Cultural Theory of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (3):455-469.
    Economics and culture are in a complex, developing relation to each other. Yet, to introduce ?culture? into economic theory requires, first of all, an appropriate understanding of culture itself. The crucial point of this paper is that culture in its development and structure is only understandable if one considers it in connection with the autonomous structural development of the forms with which the subjects experience and construct their world. In recognition of the socio?cultural organization of human society, there is (...)
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  23.  10
    Moral Willing & As Narrative (2010). It is No Easy Job to Situate a Discus-Sion of the Will Within Anthropology, Which is Perhaps Why the Editors of This Volume Chose the Title They Did. It is a Subject Some of Us Might Want to Move Toward, but There is No Sense of Arrival. Even the Paths Toward It Are Dauntingly Elusive. One is Either Faced with Too Much Relevant Literature or Too Little. On the Too Little Side, There has Been Scant Explicit Consideration of Willing as a Cultural Phenomenon, in Contrast to Philosophy and Psychology Where ... [REVIEW] In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press 50.
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  24.  10
    Guiseppina D'Oro (2013). Understanding Others: Cultural Anthropology with Collingwood and Quine. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):326-345.
    On one meaning of the term “historicism” to be a historicist is to be committed to the claim that the human sciences have a methodology of their own that is distinct in kind and not only in degree from that of the natural sciences. In this sense of the term Collingwood certainly was a historicist, for he defended the view that history is an autonomous discipline with a distinctive method and subject matter against the claim for methodological unity in the (...)
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  25.  15
    Curtiss Hoffman (2011). Introductory Overview of Archaeology's and Cultural Anthropology's Shifting Paradigms. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):69-71.
  26.  5
    Janet LeValley (1997). Doing It in Cyberspace: Cultural Sensitivity in Applied Anthropology. Anthropology of Consciousness 8 (4):113-132.
  27.  4
    Jill E. Korbin (2010). Anthropology and Child Development: A Cross‐Cultural Reader. Robert A LeVine and Rebecca S. New, Eds. Blackwell Publishing. 2008. 1+336 Pp. [REVIEW] Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (4):1-3.
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  28.  2
    Amanda Ravetz (2007). From Documenting Culture to Experimenting with Cultural Phenomena: Using Fine Art Pedagogies with Visual Anthropology Students. In Elizabeth Hallam & Tim Ingold (eds.), Creativity and Cultural Improvisation. Berg 44.
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  29.  1
    J. Barnes (2002). Africanizing Anthropology: Fieldwork, Networks, and the Making of Cultural Knowledge in Central Africa. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:336-337.
    The Rhodes‐Livingstone Institute , founded in Northern Rhodesia in 1937, was the first social science research institute in Africa. This book is a history of the RLI from its earliest beginnings with emphasis on the years up to 1960. The author, who identifies herself as a historian, supplemented her archival research with periods of fieldwork mainly devoted to oral history but including shorter spells of anthropological participant observation in association with African assistants employed by the institute. She is therefore well (...)
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  30.  1
    Douglass Price Williams (1996). Dreamwork, Anthropology and the Curing Professions: A Cultural Approach to Dreamwork. Anthropology of Consciousness 7 (2):35-36.
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  31. Lester Embree (2015). A Schutzian Theory of Cultural Anthropology. In The Schutzian Theory of the Cultural Sciences. Springer International Publishing
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  32. Douglass Price Williams (1996). Dreamwork, Anthropology and the Curing Professions: A Cultural Approach to Dreamwork:Dreamwork, Anthropology and the Curing Professions: A Cultural Approach to Dreamwork. Anthropology of Consciousness 7 (2):35-36.
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  33.  4
    George E. Marcus & Michael M. J. Fischer (1992). [Book Review] Anthropology as Cultural Critique, an Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences. [REVIEW] Ethics 102:635-649.
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  34. Stephen Nugent (1994). Reviews : George Marcus (Ed.), Rereading Cultural Anthropology. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 1992, 403 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (4):119-121.
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  35. John Hast Weakland (1951). Method in Cultural Anthropology. Philosophy of Science 18 (1):55-69.
  36.  8
    Paladd Asavarut, Peter J. Norsworthy, Joanna Cook, Simon D. Taylor-Robinson & Rachel V. Harrison (forthcoming). Diet and Disease: Transgressing Boundaries Between Science and Society—Understanding Neglected Diseases Through the Lens of Cultural Studies and Anthropology. Medical Humanities:medhum-2016-010893.
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  37. Melville J. Herskovits (1956). Cultural Anthropology. Ethics 67 (1):64-68.
     
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  38.  32
    Edward Norbeck (1964). Cultural Anthropology. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):253-272.
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  39.  24
    Hector N. Qirko (2014). Current Trends in Cultural Particularism: The Problem Does Seem to Lie With Anthropology. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):155-156.
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  40. Nancy C. Lutkehaus (2008). Putting "Culture" Into Cultural Psychology: Anthropology's Role in the Development of Bruner's Cultural Psychology. Ethos 36 (1):46-59.
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  41.  26
    Giovanni Bennardo (2014). Cognitive Anthropology's Contributions to Cognitive Science: A Cultural Human Mind, a Methodological Trajectory, and Ethnography. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):138-140.
  42.  1
    Naomi Quinn & Wendy Luttrell (2004). Psychodynamic Universals, Cultural Particulars in Feminist Anthropology: Rethinking Hua Gender Beliefs. Ethos 32 (4):493-513.
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  43. Brian Morris (1994). Anthropology of the Self the Individual in Cultural Perspective. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  44.  37
    John M. Cooper (1936). An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):131-134.
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  45.  11
    Thomas McCarthy (1992). Doing the Right Thing in Cross-Cultural Representation:The Predicament of Culture. James Clifford; Writing Culture. James Clifford, George E. Marcus; Works and Lives. Clifford Geertz; Anthropology as Cultural Critique. George E. Marcus, Michael M. J. Fischer. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (3):635-.
  46.  29
    J. J. Williams (1934). Cultural Anthropology. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):170-172.
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  47. Robert A. Paul (1991). Freud's Anthropology: A Reading of the 'Cultural Books'. In J. Neu (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Freud. Cambridge Univ Pr 267--86.
     
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  48.  41
    Peter Johnson (2006). Review of R.G. Collingwood, An Essay on Philosophical Method; the Philosophy of Enchantment, Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).
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  49.  41
    Eugene T. Gadol (1974). The Idealistic Foundations of Cultural Anthropology: Vico, Kant and Cassirer. Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (2):207-225.
  50.  10
    Giuseppina D'Oro (2013). Understanding Others: Cultural Anthropology with Collingwood and Quine. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):326-345.
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