Search results for 'Geography Methodology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Mona Domosh (1997). With 'Stout Boots and a Stout Heart': Historical Methodology and Feminist Geography. In John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.), Thresholds in Feminist Geography: Difference, Methodology, and Representation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers 232.
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  2. John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.) (1997). Thresholds in Feminist Geography: Difference, Methodology, and Representation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  3. James S. Altengarten (1976). The History, Philosophy, and Methodology of Geography: A Bibliography Selected for Education and Research. Council of Planning Librarians.
     
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  4. R. Silvey (2001). John Paul Jones III, Heidi Nast and Susan Roberts (Eds), Thresholds in Feminist Geography; Difference, Methodology, Representation. Ethics, Policy and Environment 4:286-290.
  5. Arild Holt-Jensen (1999). Geography, History and Concepts: A Student's Guide. Sage Publications.
    Totally revised and updated, written especially for students, the third edition of Geography – History and Concepts is the definitive undergraduate introduction to the history, philosophy and methodology of Human Geography. Accessible and comprehensive, the work comprises five sections: - What is Geography?: a historical overview of the discipline and an explanation of its organization - The Foundations of Geography: examines Geography from Antiquity to the early modern period; the discussion includes detailed explanations of (...)
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  6.  13
    Pamela Shurmer-Smith (ed.) (2002). Doing Cultural Geography. Sage.
    DOING CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY Edited by PAMELA SHURMER-SMITH, University of Portsmouth Doing Cultural Geography is an introduction to cultural geography that integrates theoretical discussion with applied examples: the emphasis throughout is on doing geography. Recognising that many undergraduates have difficulty with both theory and methods courses, the text explains the theory informing cultural geography and encourages students to engage directly with theory in practice. It emphasises what can be done with humanist, Marxist, poststructuralist, feminist, and postcolonial (...)
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  7.  30
    Benno Werlen (1993). Society Action and Space: An Alternative Human Geography. Routledge.
    What is space? And why are questions of space important to social theory? Society, Action and Space is the first English translation of a book which has been widely recognized in Europe as a major contribution to the interface between geography and social theory. Benno Werlen focuses on the issues which are at the heart of the most important debates in human and social geography today. One of the most significant recent developments in social analysis has been the (...)
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  8. Iain Hay (ed.) (2000). Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography. Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides concise and accessible guidance on how to conduct qualitative research in human geography. It gives particular emphasis to examples drawn from social/cultural geography, perhaps the most vibrant area of inquiry in human geography over the past decade.
     
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  9.  26
    Paul J. Cloke (ed.) (2004). Practising Human Geography. Sage.
    Practising Human Geography is critical introduction to disciplinary debates about the practise of human geography, that is informed by an inquiry into how geographers actually do research. In examining those methods and practices that are integral to doing geography, the text presents a theoretically-informed reflection on the construction and interpretation of geographical data - including factual and ‘fictional’ sources; the use of core research methodologies; and the interpretative role of the researcher. Framed by an historical overview how (...)
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  10. David Harvey (1969). Explanation in Geography. London, Edward Arnold.
  11. Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.) (1989). Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books.
     
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  12. Michael Chisholm (1975). Human Geography: Evolution or Revolution? Penguin.
  13.  28
    Dydia DeLyser (ed.) (2010). The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Geography. Sage.
    The process of learning qualitative research has altered dramatically and this Handbook explores the growth, change, and complexity within the topic and looks ...
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  14. John Eyles & David Marshall Smith (eds.) (1988). Qualitative Methods in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble.
     
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  15. Keith Hoggart (2002). Researching Human Geography. Co-Published in the U.S.A. By Oxford University Press.
    This new text offers something different from the many "methods books" available. It presents the vast array of research methodologies available to those undertaking research on the topic, illustrating the principles, strengths, and weaknesses of all approaches. The book also demonstrates how individual philosophical approaches to research impose different preferences for research methodologies.
     
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  16. Arild Holt-Jensen (1980/1982). Geography, its History and Concepts: A Student's Guide. Barnes & Noble Books.
     
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  17. R. J. Johnston (1991). A Question of Place: Exploring the Practice of Human Geography. Blackwell.
     
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  18. Audrey Lynn Kobayashi & Suzanne Mackenzie (eds.) (1989). Remaking Human Geography. Unwin Hyman.
     
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  19. David Mercer (1977). Conflict and Consensus in Human Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Monash University.
     
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  20. D. J. Walmsley (1984/1986). Human Geography: Behavioural Approaches. Wiley.
     
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  21.  8
    Robert Mugerauer (1995). Interpreting Environments: Tradition, Deconstruction, Hermeneutics. University of Texas Press.
    Mugerauer seeks to make deconstruction and hermeneutics accessible to people in the environmental disciplines, including architecture, planning, urban studies, environmental studies, and cultural geography. Mugerauer demonstrates each methodology through a case study. The first study uses the traditional approach to recover the meaning of Jung's and Wittgenstein's houses by analyzing their historical, intentional contexts. The second case study utilizes deconstruction to explore Egyptian, French neoclassical, and postmodern attempts to use pyramids to constitute a sense of lasting presence. And (...)
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  22.  26
    John A. Matthews & David T. Herbert (eds.) (2004). Unifying Geography: Common Heritage, Shared Future. Routledge.
    Unifying Geography focuses on the plural and competing versions of unity that characterize the discipline, which give it cohesion and differentiate it from related fields of knowledge. Each of the chapters is co-authored by both a leading physical and a human geographer. Themes identified include those of the traditional core as well as new and developing topics that are based on subject matter, concepts, methodology, theory, techniques and applications.
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  23. Yunlong Cai (ed.) (2011). Di Li Xue Fang Fa Lun. Ke Xue Chu Ban She.
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  24. Kōnstantinos Apostolou Doxiadēs (1972). The Method for the Study of the Ancient Greek Settlements. [Athens]Athens Center of Ekistics.
     
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  25. Jean-Paul Ferrier (ed.) (2005). Alter-Géographies: Fiches Disputables de Géographie. Publications de l'Université de Provence.
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  26. Peter Haggett (1977). Locational Methods. Wiley.
     
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  27. Daozhang Jiang (2006). Xian Dai di Li Xue de Gai Nian Yu Fang Fa. Wen Jin Chu Ban She.
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  28. Mílton Santos (2012). Metamorfoses Do Espaço Habitado: Fundamentos Teóricos E Metodológicos da Geografia. Edusp.
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  29.  4
    Karen Nairn (1997). Hearing From Quiet Students: The Politics of Silence and Voice in Geography Classrooms. In John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.), Thresholds in Feminist Geography: Difference, Methodology, and Representation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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  30. Jane Holder & Carolyn Harrison (eds.) (2003). Law and Geography. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume explores the relationship between law and geography, especially with respect to taken-for-granted distinctions between the social and the material, the human and non-human, and what constitutes persons and things. As a genuinely reflective `Law and Geography' project, this collection offers interdisciplinary inquiry, particularly in response to globalisation - of law, commerce, environmental change and society - which renders relations between the local and the global more significant. Because of the sheer expansiveness and complexity of both law (...)
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  31. Daniel Dorling (1997). Mapping: Ways of Representing the World. Longman.
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  32.  19
    Caterina Marchionni (2006). Contrastive Explanation and Unrealistic Models: The Case of the New Economic Geography. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (4):425-446.
    The contrastive approach to explanation is employed to shed light on the issue of the unrealisticness of models and their assumptions in economics. If we take explanations to be answers to contrastive questions of the form, then unrealistic elements such as omissions and idealizations are (at least partly) dependent on the selected contrast. These contrast?dependent assumptions are shown to serve the function of fixing the shared causal background between the fact and the foil. It is argued that looking at the (...)
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  33.  7
    Dawn Youngblood (2007). Multidisciplinarity, Interdisciplinarity, and Bridging Disciplines: A Matter of Process. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M18.
    Bridging disciplines have much to teach us about how to combine analytical tools to tackle problems and questions that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. This article uses examples from the older bridging disciplines of geography and anthropology in order to consider what the relatively young undertaking labeled “interdisciplinary studies” can learn from their long existence. It explains what is meant by the fallacy of nomothetic claim and considers the fruitful production of answers and solutions by viewing process (methodology) not (...)
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  34.  1
    Carol Ekinsmyth (2002). 16 Feminist Methodology Carol Ekinsmyth. In Pamela Shurmer-Smith (ed.), Doing Cultural Geography. Sage 177.
  35. Jessica M. Wilson (2013). Three Dogmas of Metaphysical Methodology. In Matthew Haug (ed.), Philosophical Methodology: The Armchair or the Laboratory? Routledge 145-165.
    In what does philosophical progress consist? 'Vertical' progress corresponds to development within a specific paradigm/framework for theorizing (of the sort associated, revolutions aside, with science); 'horizontal' progress corresponds to the identification and cultivation of diverse paradigms (of the sort associated, conservativism aside, with art and pure mathematics). Philosophical progress seems to involve both horizontal and vertical dimensions, in a way that is somewhat puzzling: philosophers work in a number of competing frameworks (like artists or mathematicians), while typically maintaining that only (...)
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  36.  79
    Christian List & Laura Valentini (forthcoming). The Methodology of Political Theory. In Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Methodology. Oxford University Press
    Political theory, sometimes also called “normative political theory”, is a subfield of the disciplines of philosophy and political science that addresses conceptual, normative, and evaluative questions concerning politics and society, broadly construed. Examples are: When is a society just? What does it mean for its members to be free? When is one distribution of goods socially preferable to another? What makes a political authority legitimate? How should we trade off different values, such as liberty, prosperity, and security, against one another? (...)
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  37.  24
    David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.) (2005). Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
    A term with myriad associations, revolution is commonly understood in its intellectual, historical, and sociopolitical contexts. Until now, almost no attention has been paid to revolution and questions of geography. Geography and Revolution examines the ways that place and space matter in a variety of revolutionary situations. David N. Livingstone and Charles W. J. Withers assemble a set of essays that are themselves revolutionary in uncovering not only the geography of revolutions but the role of (...) in revolutions. Here, scientific revolutions—Copernican, Newtonian, and Darwinian—ordinarily thought of as placeless, are revealed to be rooted in specific sites and spaces. Technical revolutions—the advent of print, time-keeping, and photography—emerge as inventions that transformed the world's order without homogenizing it. Political revolutions—in France, England, Germany, and the United States—are notable for their debates on the nature of political institutions and national identity. Gathering insight from geographers, historians, and historians of science, Geography and Revolution is an invitation to take the where as seriously as the who and the when in examining the nature, shape, and location of revolutions. (shrink)
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  38.  30
    Holly L. Wilson (2011). The Pragmatic Use of Kant’s Physical Geography Lectures. In Stuart Elden & Eduardo Mendieta (eds.), Reading Kant's Geography. State University of New York Press
    Kant gave lectures on physical geography and anthropology and called them cosmopolitan philosophy. His physical geography lectures were intended to teach students not just facts but also how to have practical judgment and were to prepare students for their place in the world. This article shows how the physical geography lectures were organized for that purpose.
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  39. Jack Reynolds & Patrick Stokes (forthcoming). Writing the First Person: Existentialist Methodology and Perspective. In Soren Overgaard & Giuseppina D'Oro (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Philosophical Methodology. Cambridge UP
    Without proposing anything quite so grandiose as a return to existentialism, in this paper we aim to articulate and minimally defend certain core existentialist insights concerning the first-person perspective, the relationship between theory and practice, and the mode of philosophical presentation conducive to best making those points. We will do this by considering some of the central methodological objections that have been posed around the role of the first-person perspective and “lived experience” in the contemporary literature, before providing some neo-existentialist (...)
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  40.  30
    Benjamin C. Jantzen, Deborah G. Mayo & Lydia Patton (2015). Ontology & Methodology. Synthese 192 (11):3413-3423.
    Philosophers of science have long been concerned with the question of what a given scientific theory tells us about the contents of the world, but relatively little attention has been paid to how we set out to build theories and to the relevance of pre-theoretical methodology on a theory’s interpretation. In the traditional view, the form and content of a mature theory can be separated from any tentative ontological assumptions that went into its development. For this reason, the target (...)
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  41. Imre Lakatos (1978). The Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes. Cambridge University Press.
    Imre Lakatos' philosophical and scientific papers are published here in two volumes. Volume I brings together his very influential but scattered papers on the philosophy of the physical sciences, and includes one important unpublished essay on the effect of Newton's scientific achievement. Volume II presents his work on the philosophy of mathematics (much of it unpublished), together with some critical essays on contemporary philosophers of science and some famous polemical writings on political and educational issues. Imre Lakatos had an influence (...)
     
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  42. Murat Aydede (ed.) (2005). Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. MIT Press.
    What does feeling a sharp pain in one's hand have in common with seeing a red apple on the table? Some say not much, apart from the fact that they are both conscious experiences. To see an object is to perceive an extramental reality -- in this case, a red apple. To feel a pain, by contrast, is to undergo a conscious experience that doesn't necessarily relate the subject to an objective reality. Perceptualists, however, dispute this. They say that both (...)
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  43. James Woodward (2015). Methodology, Ontology, and Interventionism. Synthese 192 (11):3577-3599.
    This paper defends an interventionist account of causation by construing this account as a contribution to methodology, rather than as a set of theses about the ontology or metaphysics of causation. It also uses the topic of causation to raise some more general issues about the relation between, on the one hand, methodology, and, on the other hand, ontology and metaphysics, as these are understood in contemporary philosophical discussion, particularly among so-called analytic metaphysicians. It concludes with the suggestion (...)
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  44.  63
    James Justus (2012). Carnap on Concept Determination: Methodology for Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (2):161-179.
    Abstract Recent criticisms of intuition from experimental philosophy and elsewhere have helped undermine the authority of traditional conceptual analysis. As the product of more empirically informed philosophical methodology, this result is compelling and philosophically salutary. But the negative critiques rarely suggest a positive alternative. In particular, a normative account of concept determination—how concepts should be characterized—is strikingly absent from such work. Carnap's underappreciated theory of explication provides such a theory. Analyses of complex concepts in empirical sciences illustrates and supports (...)
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  45.  10
    Kenneth Einar Himma (2015). Conceptual Jurisprudence. An Introduction to Conceptual Analysis and Methodology in Legal Theory. Revus 26.
    This essay attempts to provide an accessible introduction to the topic area of conceptual analysis of legal concepts and its methodology. I attempt to explain, at a fairly foundational level, what conceptual analysis is, how it is done and why it is important in theorizing about the law. I also attempt to explain how conceptual analysis is related to other areas in philosophy, such as metaphysics and epistemology. Next, I explain the enterprise of conceptual jurisprudence, as concerned to provide (...)
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  46.  19
    Lucy Frith (2012). Symbiotic Empirical Ethics: A Practical Methodology. Bioethics 26 (4):198-206.
    Like any discipline, bioethics is a developing field of academic inquiry; and recent trends in scholarship have been towards more engagement with empirical research. This ‘empirical turn’ has provoked extensive debate over how such ‘descriptive’ research carried out in the social sciences contributes to the distinctively normative aspect of bioethics. This paper will address this issue by developing a practical research methodology for the inclusion of data from social science studies into ethical deliberation. This methodology will be based (...)
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  47. Lars-Göran Johansson & Keizo Matsubara (2011). String Theory and General Methodology: A Mutual Evaluation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (3):199-210.
    String theory has been the dominating research field in theoretical physics during the last decades. Despite the considerable time elapse, no new testable predictions have been derived by string theorists and it is understandable that doubts have been voiced. Some people have argued that it is time to give up since testability is wanting. But the majority has not been convinced and they continue to believe that string theory is the right way to go. This situation is interesting for philosophy (...)
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  48. Vadim V. Vasilyev (2013). Hume's Methodology and the Science of Human Nature. History of Philosophy Yearbook 2012:62-115.
    In this paper I try to explain a strange omission in Hume’s methodological descriptions in his first Enquiry. In the course of this explanation I reveal a kind of rationalistic tendency of the latter work. It seems to contrast with “experimental method” of his early Treatise of Human Nature, but, as I show that there is no discrepancy between the actual methods of both works, I make an attempt to explain the change in Hume’s characterization of his own methods. This (...)
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  49.  35
    James D. Proctor & David Marshall Smith (eds.) (1999). Geography and Ethics: Journeys in a Moral Terrain. Routledge.
    Geography and Ethics examines the place of geography in ethics and of ethics in geography by drawing together specially commissioned contributors from distinguished scholars from around the world.
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  50.  44
    Gregor Betz (2010). What’s the Worst Case? The Methodology of Possibilistic Prediction. Analyse & Kritik 32 (1):87-106.
    Frank Knight (1921) famously distinguished the epistemic modes of certainty, risk, and uncertainty in order to characterize situations where deterministic, probabilistic or possibilistic foreknowledge is available. Because our probabilistic knowledge is limited, i.e. because many systems, e.g. the global climate, cannot be described and predicted probabilistically in a reliable way, Knight's third category, possibilistic foreknowledge, is not simply swept by the probabilistic mode. This raises the question how to justify possibilistic predictionsincluding the identication of the worst case. The development of (...)
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