Search results for 'Gurus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  24
    R. P. Goldman (1978). Fathers, Sons and Gurus: Oedipal Conflict in the Sanskrit Epics. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 6 (4):325-392.
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  2.  9
    Shapiro St E. Wa Rt (2005). Gurus, Logical Consequence, and Truth-Bearers: What Is It That Is True? In J. C. Beall & B. Armour-Garb (eds.), Deflationary Truth. Open Court 153.
  3.  2
    Amanda Lucia (2014). Innovative Gurus: Tradition and Change in Contemporary Hinduism. International Journal of Hindu Studies 18 (2):221-263.
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  4.  2
    Jeevan Deol (2001). Non-Canonical Compositions Attributed to the Seventh and Ninth Sikh Gurus. Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (2):193-203.
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  5.  3
    Max Lawson (1988). Growing Up Lightly: Rascal-Gurus and American Educational Thought. Educational Philosophy and Theory 20 (1):37–49.
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  6. J. E. Cooper (1965). Observations on the Steppe Lemming {la Gurus I a Gurus). In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship 31--107.
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  7. Toyin Falola (1998). Yoruba Gurus Indigenous Production of Knowledge in Africa.
     
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  8. Christian Feichtinger & Johannes Thonhauser (2010). Gurus-Masters-Scholars. Phenomenology and Transformation of the Charismatic Teachers. Disputatio Philosophica 11 (1):25-44.
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  9. Christian Feichtinger & Johannes Thonhauser (2010). Gurus-Meister-Gelehrte. Phänomenologie und Transformation des charismatischen Lehrmeisters. Disputatio Philosophica 11 (1):25 - 44.
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  10. Gurbachan Singh Makin (1994). Philosophy of Sikh Gurus. Guru Tegh Bahadur Educational Centre.
     
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  11. Bill McKelvey, Henry Mintzberg, Tom Petzinger, Larry Prusak, Peter Senge, Ron Shultz, Y. Bar-Yam & D. Lebaron (1999). The Gurus Speak: Complexity and Organizations. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1 (1):73-91.
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  12. Shandip Saha (2007). Hinduism, Gurus and Globalization. In Peter Beyer & Lori G. Beaman (eds.), Religion, Globalization and Culture. Brill 6--485.
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  13. Nicolas Wyatt (1973). Marvin H. Harper. Gurus, Swamis and Avataras—Spiritual Masters and Their American Disciples. Pp. 271. $7.50. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 9 (3):376.
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  14. William Cenkner (1983). A Tradition of Teachers: Śaṅkara and the Jagadgurus Today. Motilal Banarsidass.
     
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  15. Måns Broo (2003). As Good as God: The Guru in Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇavism. Åbo Akademi University Press.
     
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  16. Christopher Isherwood (1980). My Guru and His Disciple.
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  17. Maharaj Gulābarāva (1976). Phasavy Ā Gurūcī Uttama Caryā.
     
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  18. Pratima P. Joshi (2010). Human Being, Nature, and Guru. Readworthy Publications.
     
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  19. Sujata Nahar, Michel Danino & Shankar Bandyopadhyay (eds.) (2003). Sri Aurobindo to Dilip. Distributors, Mira Aditi Centre.
     
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  20. K. N. Rao (1996). Yogis, Destiny, and the Wheel of Time. Vani Graphics.
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  21.  65
    Peter Carruthers (1992). The Animals Issue: Moral Theory in Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Do animals have moral rights? In contrast to the philosophical gurus of the animal rights movement, whose opinion has held moral sway in recent years, Peter Carruthers here claims that they do not. He explores a variety of moral theories, arguing that animals lack direct moral significance. This provocative but judiciously argued book will appeal to all those interested in animal rights, whatever their initial standpoint. It will also serve as a lively introduction to ethics, demonstrating why theoretical issues (...)
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  22. Alain Badiou (2011). Second Manifesto for Philosophy. Polity.
    Twenty years ago, Alain Badiou's first Manifesto for Philosophy rose up against the all-pervasive proclamation of the "end" of philosophy. In lieu of this problematic of the end, he put forward the watchword: "one more step". The situation has considerably changed since then. Philosophy was threatened with obliteration at the time, whereas today it finds itself under threat for the diametrically opposed reason: it is endowed with an excessive, artificial existence. "Philosophy" is everywhere. It serves as a trademark for various (...)
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  23. Alain Badiou (2011). Second Manifesto for Philosophy. Polity.
    Twenty years ago, Alain Badiou's first Manifesto for Philosophy rose up against the all-pervasive proclamation of the "end" of philosophy. In lieu of this problematic of the end, he put forward the watchword: "one more step". The situation has considerably changed since then. Philosophy was threatened with obliteration at the time, whereas today it finds itself under threat for the diametrically opposed reason: it is endowed with an excessive, artificial existence. "Philosophy" is everywhere. It serves as a trademark for various (...)
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  24. Peter Carruthers (2012). The Animals Issue: Moral Theory in Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Do animals have moral rights? In contrast to the philosophical gurus of the animal rights movement, whose opinion has held moral sway in recent years, Peter Carruthers here claims that they do not. He explores a variety of moral theories, arguing that animals lack direct moral significance. This provocative but judiciously argued book will appeal to all those interested in animal rights, whatever their initial standpoint. It will also serve as a lively introduction to ethics, demonstrating why theoretical issues (...)
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  25.  55
    Dan Sperber (2010). The Guru Effect. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (4):583-592.
    Obscurity of expression is considered a flaw. Not so, however, in the speech or writing of intellectual gurus. All too often, what readers do is judge profound what they have failed to grasp. Here I try to explain this guru effect by looking at the psychology of trust and interpretation, at the role of authority and argumentation, and at the effects of these dispositions and processes when they operate at a population level where, I argue, a runaway phenomenon of (...)
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  26.  37
    Pak-Hang Wong (2013). Technology, Recommendation and Design: On Being a 'Paternalistic' Philosopher. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):27-42.
    Philosophers have talked to each other about moral issues concerning technology, but few of them have talked about issues of technology and the good life, and even fewer have talked about technology and the good life with the public in the form of recommendation. In effect, recommendations for various technologies are often left to technologists and gurus. Given the potential benefits of informing the public on their impacts on the good life, however, this is a curious state of affairs. (...)
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  27. Tim LeBon (2001). Wise Therapy: Philosophy for Counsellors. Continuum.
    Independent on Sunday October 2nd One of the country's lead­ing philosophical counsellers, and chairman of the Society for Philosophy in Practice (SPP), Tim LeBon, said it typically took around six 50 ­minute sessions for a client to move from confusion to resolution. Mr LeBon, who has 'published a book on the subject, Wise Therapy, said philoso­phy was perfectly suited to this type of therapy, dealing as it does with timeless human issues such as love, purpose, happiness and emo­tional challenges. `Wise (...)
     
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  28. Jeanne Openshaw (2010). Writing the Self: The Life and Philosophy of a Dissenting Bengali Baul Guru. Oxford University Press.
    This book investigates the largely unexplored terrain of the lives of Baul Gurus by studying the autobiography of Baul Guru, Raj Krishna, and situating Baul songs in a larger socio-historical perspective. The author examines the life, 'lineage', and legacy of Raj Krishna in the context of the Renaissance in colonial Bengal, the growth of urban middle classes, transforming identities and the development of spiritual philosophy in the subcontinent. She traces the life and beliefs of Raj and his disciples through (...)
     
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  29.  20
    A. Ross (2003). The Self: From Soul to Brain A New York Academy of Sciences Conference, New York City, 26-28 September, 2002. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (2):67-85.
    The Mount Sinai School of Medicine is an imposing monument to the wealth and power of scientific medicine. Set on its own block in upper Manhattan, its rhetorical centre is the Stern Auditorium. Here, just over a year after 9/11, a group of gurus and self-seekers assembled to confer on the nature of the self. I was there too, looking for help in constructing a grand unified theory of soul and brain.
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  30.  13
    Mark W. Moss (2003). Practically Useless? Why Management Theory Needs Popper. Philosophy of Management 3 (3):31-42.
    What would Karl Popper have made of today’s management and organisation theories? He would surely have approved of the openness of debate in some quarters, but the ease with which many managers accept the generalisations of some academics, gurus and consultants might well have troubled him. Popperhimself argued that processes of induction alone were unlikely to lead to developments in knowledge and considered processes of justification to be more important. He claimed that it was not through verifying theories from (...)
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  31.  4
    Carl Fredrik Rudolf Cederstrom & Simon Critchley, How to Stop Living and Start Worrying: Conversations with Carl Cederstrom.
    The question of how to lead a happy and meaningful life has been at the heart of philosophical debate since time immemorial. Today, however, these questions seem to be addressed not by philosophers but self–help gurus, who frantically champion the individual′s quest for self–expression and self–realization; the desire to become authentic. Against these new age sophistries, How to Stop Living and Start Worrying tackles the question of ′how to live′ by forcing us to explore our troubling relationship with death. (...)
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  32.  51
    James Franklin (2011). Philosophy in Sydney. In G. Oppy & N. Trakakis (eds.), The Antipodean Philosopher. Lexington Books 61-66.
    Let me tell you what philosophy is about, then about how Sydney does it in its own special way. Does life have a meaning, and if so what is it? What can I be certain of, and how should I act when I am not certain? Why are the established truths of my tribe better than the primitive superstitions of your tribe? Why should I do as I’m told? Those are questions it’s easy to avoid, in the rush to acquire (...)
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  33.  38
    Jaroslav Peregrin, Constructions and Concepts.
    Some twenty years ago, semanticists of natural language came to be overwhelmed by the problem of semantic analysis of belief sentences (and sentences reporting other kinds of propositional attitudes): the trouble was that sentences of the shapes X believes that A and X believes that B appeared to be able to have different truth values even in cases when A and B shared the same intension, i.e. were, from the viewpoint of intensional semantics, synonymous 1 . Thus, taking intensional semantics (...)
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  34. W. Y. Evans-Wentz (1968). Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines. New York [Etc.],Oxford U.P..
    General introduction.--The supreme path of discipleship: the precepts of the gurus.--The nirvānic path: the yoga of the great symbol.--The path of knowledge: the yoga of the six doctrines.--The path of transference: the yoga of consciousness-transference.--The path of the mystic sacrifice: the yoga of subduing the lower self.--The path of the five wisdoms: the yoga of the long hūm.--The path of the transcendental wisdom: the yoga of the voidness.
     
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  35.  7
    Stephen Law (2003). Thinking Tools 4: How to Sound Like a Guru. Think 2 (4):85.
    Thinking Tools is a regular feature that introduces pointers on thinking clearly and rigorously. Here l explain some of the techniques commonly used by ‘gurus’ to dupe people into thinking they have something profound to say.
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  36.  6
    Ashly Pinnington (2001). Charles Handy. Philosophy of Management 1 (3):47-55.
    Among many managers Charles Handy might well be described as a ‘world class’ management thinker. He is certainly the first British management author to have achieved international guru status. The author of widely-commended management best-sellers and MBA set texts, known through broadcasting andmanagement videos, he has presented himself more recently as a self-styled ‘social philosopher’. But just how philosophical is he? Does he offer genuinely new ideas? And what explains his vast appeal? Ashly Pinnington considers three works from Handy’s social (...)
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  37.  16
    Roger R. Jackson (1992). The Tibetan Tshogs Zhing (Field of Assembly): General Notes on its Function, Structure and Contents. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):157 – 172.
    Abstract The tshogs zhing, or field of assembly, is an important subject in Tibetan religious art. Typically, it focuses on one's own guru, seated at the crest of a great tree, with the gurus preceding him ranged in the sky above him and the deities of one's tradition ranged on the tree below him. The tshogs zhing is an object of visualisation in Tibetan guru yoga practices, and serves as both a ?map? of the Tibetan sacred cosmos and as (...)
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  38.  5
    Kazem Chaharbaghi & Victor Newman (2007). Cruel Comforters. Philosophy of Management 6 (1):135-146.
    The influence of popular management gurus derives from two factors: the willingness of their management audience to outsource or subcontract thinking and the ability of gurus to deliver apparently relatively simple messages to an audience that probably does not want or need to think deeply, while retaining their leadership status. As managers look to management gurus to provide them only with reasons to be, to behave or act as opposed to reasons to think, per se, the nature (...)
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  39.  5
    Alan Watts (1972/2007). In My Own Way: An Autobiography, 1915-1965. New World Library.
    In this new edition of his acclaimed autobiography — long out of print and rare until now — Alan Watts tracks his spiritual and philosophical evolution from a child of religious conservatives in rural England to a freewheeling spiritual teacher who challenged Westerners to defy convention and think for themselves. From early in this intellectual life, Watts shows himself to be a philosophical renegade and wide-ranging autodidact who came to Buddhism through the teachings of Christmas Humphreys and D. T. Suzuki. (...)
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  40.  7
    David Hutchins (2012). Hammers, Nails, Sealing Wax, String and Gunpowder! AI and Society 27 (3):363-368.
    Starting from experience of working with Japanese Quality Gurus, and decades of industrial consultancy, this article addresses the fundamental principles of the Quality Movement and suggests ways forward for Quality as empowerment, led from education. Quality Circles, empowering workers, and Students’ Quality Circles, empowering students, provide a starting point for educational, economic and social innovation.
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  41.  3
    A. W. Shrowty (1996). Knowledge Transfer and the Guru-Shishya Model. Journal of Human Values 2 (2):127-135.
    This paper outlines an indigenous Indian approach for the training of engineers to fulfil the objective of effective technology transfer to a new site from the mother plant. The approach reflects the courage of conviction to translate the holistic and ancient model of knowledge transfer: the guru-shishya relationship. The requirements of such a model, the practical working out of these requirements, and the views of both shishyas and gurus after the experience are shared with great simplicity.
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  42.  3
    T. M. Kemple (2007). Spirits of Late Capitalism. Theory, Culture and Society 24 (3):147-159.
    Taking Max Weber's conception of the modern capitalist world system as a classical precedent, and with reference to a series of analytical schemas on capital formation, this essay takes three recent books as a starting point for examining the revival of critical theoretical attention to 'the new capitalism'. The Social Structures of the Economy by Pierre Bourdieu focuses on the erosion of the separation between business and household economies by providing a case study of the construction boom in single-family dwellings (...)
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  43.  1
    Geert Lovink (2003). Après le boom de la net-économie. Multitudes 1 (1):107-118.
    The essay looks into the world of the Internet after the dotcom crash. It investigates the ways in which libertarian gurus and leading business journals responded to the April 2000 downfall of the NASDAQ. Also it reviews the latest work of Manuel Castells, The Internet Galaxy, and looks into the ambivalent position of Castells towards « real » Sillicon Valley and the « bubble » dotcoms.
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  44.  6
    Anne Murphy (2007). History in the Sikh Past. History and Theory 46 (3):345–365.
    This article offers a reading of an early eighteenth-century Punjabi text—Gur Sobha or “The Splendor of the Guru”—as a form of historical representation, suggesting reasons for the importance of the representation of the past as history within Sikh discursive contexts. The text in question provides an account of the life, death, and teachings of the last of the ten living Sikh Gurus or teachers, Guru Gobind Singh. The article argues that the construction of history in this text is linked (...)
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  45. Peter Carruthers (2011). The Animals Issue: Moral Theory in Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Do animals have moral rights? In contrast to the philosophical gurus of the animal rights movement, whose opinion has held moral sway in recent years, Peter Carruthers here claims that they do not. He explores a variety of moral theories, arguing that animals lack direct moral significance. This provocative but judiciously argued book will appeal to all those interested in animal rights, whatever their initial standpoint. It will also serve as a lively introduction to ethics, demonstrating why theoretical issues (...)
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  46. Paul Froese (2016). On Purpose: How We Create the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What is your purpose in life? This simple question motivates some of our most life-altering decisions, deeply-held beliefs, and profound emotions, as well as the choices we make every single day. How we derive meaning from our existence is crucial to finding happiness, developing relationships, and building societies. In On Purpose, Paul Froese brings together data from large national and international surveys with interviews that illuminate the ways in which people from all walks of life grapple with their continuous search (...)
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  47. Rajiv Mehrotra (2003). The Mind of the Guru: Conservations with Spiritual Masters. Viking.
    The guru is our inner wisdom, our fundamental clarity of mind, as the Dalai Lama puts it. In The Mind of the Guru Rajiv Mehrotra brings together twenty contemporary sages and masters who have illumined this reality in their interaction with millions of followers. He elicits from them their deepest concerns and beliefs and the different ways in which they have helped people find a way to happiness. Ranged here are gurus as diverse as Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan, who (...)
     
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  48. Michael Parenti (2010). God and His Demons. Prometheus Books.
    Part I: All in the Bible -- Up from heaven -- The great exterminator -- The great abominator -- The other face of our sweet Savior -- Who killed Jesus and all those other Jews? -- Part II: Divine design -- Working his blunders in mysterious ways -- Jiffy creation, dubious design -- Part III: When the ethereal becomes material -- Mother Teresa, John Paul, and the fast-track saints -- Cashing in on heaven -- Moneyed gurus and cults -- (...)
     
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  49.  30
    William I. Thompson (2003). The Borg or Borges? In Owen Holland (ed.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. Imprint Academic 187-192.
    It is a paradox of the work of Artificial Intelligence that in order to grant consciousness to machines, the engineers first labour to subtract it from humans, as they work to foist upon philosophers a caricature of consciousness in the digital switches of weights and gates in neural nets. As the caricature goes into public circulation with the help of the media, it becomes an acceptable counterfeit currency, and the humanistic philosopher of mind soon finds himself replaced by the robotics (...)
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  50.  12
    Noel M. Tichy & Andrew R. McGill (eds.) (2003). The Ethical Challenge: How to Lead with Unyielding Integrity. Jossey-Bass.
    The Enron debacle, the demise of Arthur Andersen, questionable practices at Tyco, Qwest, WorldCom, and a seemingly endless list of others have pushed public regard for business and business leaders to new lows. The need for smart leaders with vision and integrity has never been greater. Things need to change-- and it will not be easy. We can take a first step toward producing better business leaders by changing some of our own ideas about what it means to "win." Noel (...)
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