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  1. John Collier & Michael Stingl (2013). Evolutionary Moral Realism. Biological Theory 7 (3):218-226.
    Evolutionary moral realism is the view that there are moral values with roots in evolution that are both specifically moral and exist independently of human belief systems. In beginning to sketch the outlines of such a view, we examine moral goods like fairness and empathetic caring as valuable and real aspects of the environments of species that are intelligent and social, or at least developing along an evolutionary trajectory that could lead to a level of intelligence that would enable individual (...)
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  2. Michael Stingl (2013). Love as a Guide to Morals, by Andrew Fitz-Gibbon. Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):313-316.
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  3. Michael Stingl (2012). Equality and Efficiency as Basic Social Values. In Elisabeth Airini Boetzkes & Wilfrid J. Waluchow (eds.), Readings in Health Care Ethics. Broadview Press. 67.
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  4. Michael Stingl (ed.) (2010). The Price of Compassion: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Broadview Press.
    This important book includes a compelling selection of original essays on euthanasia and associated legislative and health care issues, together with important background material for understanding and assessing the arguments of these essays. The book explores a central strand in the debate over medically assisted death, the so called "slippery slope" argument. The focus of the book is on one particularly important aspect of the downward slope of this argument: hastening the death of those individuals who appear to be suffering (...)
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  5. Maeve O'beirne, Michael Stingl & Sarah Hayward (2007). Who Reviews the Projects of Unaffiliated Researchers for Ethics? A Case Study From Alberta. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (03):346-355.
    Developments in the last several years have sparked renewed interest in the ethics of research involving humans. Issues relating to the global extent of research and its guiding principles are of particular importance to researchers, health officials, and individual ethics committees who want a deeper and more encompassing inquiry regarding the foundation and evolution of human research. This department of CQ launches a long overdue effort to explore these wider issues. Readers are invited to submit papers to Charles MacKay, 5011 (...)
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  6. Michael Stingl (2005). Mark H. Bernstein, Without a Tear: Our Tragic Relationship with Animals Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (2):85-89.
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  7. Michael Stingl (2005). Neil Levy, What Makes Us Moral? Crossing the Boundaries of Biology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (5):364-366.
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  8. Michael Stingl (2005). Tom Regan, Empty Cages: Facing the Challenge of Animal Rights Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (2):85-89.
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  9. Michael Stingl & John Collier (2005). Reasonable Partiality From a Biological Point of View. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):11 - 24.
    Speculation about the evolutionary origins of morality has yet to show how a biologically based capacity for morality might be connected to moral reasoning. Applying an evolutionary approach to three kinds of cases where partiality may or may not be morally reasonable, this paper explores a possible connection between a psychological capacity for morality and processes of wide reflective moral equilibrium. The central hypothesis is that while we might expect a capacity for morality to include aspects of partiality, we might (...)
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  10. Michael Stingl & John Collier (2004). After the Fall: Religious Capacities and the Error Theory of Morality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):751-752.
    The target article proposes an error theory for religious belief. In contrast, moral beliefs are typically not counterintuitive, and some moral cognition and motivation is functional. Error theories for moral belief try to reduce morality to nonmoral psychological capacities because objective moral beliefs seem too fragile in a competitive environment. An error theory for religious belief makes this unnecessary.
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  11. Michael Stingl (2000). All the Monkeys Aren't in the Zoo. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (Supplement):245-265.
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  12. Michael Stingl (1998). Euthanasia and Health Reform in Canada. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):348-362.
    This paper examines the following line of argument against allowing euthanasia in Canada.
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  13. Michael Stingl (1998). Still Waiting for Rain Rain Without Thunder: The Ideology of the Animal Rights Movement Gary L. Francione. Bioscience 48 (5):407-408.
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  14. Michael Stingl (1998). Still Waiting for Rain. Bioscience 48 (5):407-408.
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  15. Michael Stingl (1996). Evolutionary Ethics and Moral Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (4):531-545.
    This example, like the others, demands further discussion. My conclusion must therefore remain modest: an agent-neutral theory of our moral competence is not biologically implausible. Agent-centered rules like tit-for-tat, prerogatives, special obligations, and duties not to harm others might be best regarded as belonging to the theory of moral performance rather than the theory of moral competence. For biologists who may think otherwise, the general argument of this essay is that any claims to the contrary must be based on more (...)
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  16. John Collier & Michael Stingl (1993). Evolutionary Naturalism and the Objectivity of Morality. Biology and Philosophy 8 (1):47-60.
    We propose an objective and justifiable ethics that is contingent on the truth of evolutionary theory. We do not argue for the truth of this position, which depends on the empirical question of whether moral functions form a natural class, but for its cogency and possibility. The position we propose combines the advantages of Kantian objectivity with the explanatory and motivational advantages of moral naturalism. It avoids problems with the epistemological inaccessibility of transcendent values, while avoiding the relativism or subjectivism (...)
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  17. Michael Stingl (1991). John Dunn, Interpreting Political Responsibility Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (6):390-392.
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