Search results for 'Physician-Patient Relations' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno (1994). Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.score: 110.0
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received in a lukewarm fashion (...)
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  2. Greg Clarke, Robert T. Hall & Greg Rosencrance (2004). Physician-Patient Relations: No More Models. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):16 – 19.score: 104.0
    Currently, the common theoretical models of "preferred" decision-making relationships do not correspond well with clinical experience. This interview study of congestive heart failure (CHF) patients documents the variety of patient preferences for decision-making, and the necessity for attention to family involvement. In addition, these findings illustrate the confusion as to the designation of surrogate decision-makers and physicians in charge. We conclude that no single model of physician-patient decision-making should be preferred, and that physicians should first ask patients how they (...)
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  3. Marli Huijer & Guy Widdershoven (2001). Desires in Palliative Medicine. Five Models of the Physician‐Patient Interaction on Palliative Treatment Related to Hellenistic Therapies of Desire. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):143-159.score: 104.0
    In this paper, we explore the desires that play a role at the palliative stage and relate them to various approaches to patient autonomy. What attitude can physicians and other caregivers take to the desires of patients at the palliative stage? We examine this question by introducing five physicians who are consulted by Jackie, an imaginary patient with metastatic lung carcinoma. By combining the models of the physician-patient relationship developed by Emanuel and Emanuel (1992) and the Hellenistic approaches to (...)
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  4. Douglas N. Walton (1985). Physician-Patient Decision-Making: A Study in Medical Ethics. Greenwood Press.score: 102.0
     
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  5. M. L. Campbell (1988). The Oath: An Investigation of the Injunction Prohibiting Physician-Patient Sexual Relations. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 32 (2):300-308.score: 87.0
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  6. R. A. Carson (2011). On Metaphorical Concentration: Language and Meaning in Patient-Physician Relations. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (4):385-393.score: 85.0
    Charles Taylor's retrieval of an expressivist understanding of persons, and of language as constitutive of meaning, contains promising insights for restoring moral connectedness between patients and physicians.
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  7. Christina M. van Der Feltz-Cornelis (2002). The Impact of Factitious Disorder on the Physician-Patient Relationship. An Epistemological Model. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):253-261.score: 84.0
    Theoretical models for physician-patient communication in clinical practice are described in literature, but none of them seems adequate for solving the communication problem in clinical practice that emerges in case of factitious disorder. Theoretical models generally imply open communication and respect for the autonomy of the patient. In factitious disorder, the physician is confronted by lies and (self)destructive behaviour of the patient, who in one way or another tries to involve the physician in this behaviour. It is no longer (...)
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  8. Keith Bauer (2004). Cybermedicine and the Moral Integrity of the Physician–Patient Relationship. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):83-91.score: 84.0
    Some critiques of cybermedicine claim that it is problematic because it fails to create physician–patient relationships. But, electronically mediated encounters do create such relationships. The issue is the nature and quality of those relationships and whether they are conducive to good patient care and meet the ethical ideals and standards of medicine. In this paper, I argue that effective communication and compassion are, in most cases, necessary for the establishment of trusting and morally appropriate physician–patient relationships. The creation of these (...)
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  9. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1988). For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 83.0
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life determinations, (...)
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  10. Susan Budd & Ursula Sharma (eds.) (1994). The Healing Bond: The Patient-Practitioner Relationship and Therapeutic Responsibility. Routledge.score: 81.0
    By considering the nature of the relationship between patient and healer, The Healing Bond explores the responsibilities of both, with a special emphasis on the therapeutic responsibility. The editors and contributors examine both orthodox and unorthodox forms of healing practice and apply a variety of professional and analytic perspectives to the medical profession as a whole. They look at specific areas of health such as midwifery, psychoanalysis, naturopathy, the relations between medicine and state, and the appeal of "quacks." Particular (...)
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  11. Alan Schwartz (2008). Medical Decision Making: A Physician's Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 81.0
    Decision making is a key activity, perhaps the most important activity, in the practice of healthcare. Although physicians acquire a great deal of knowledge and specialised skills during their training and through their practice, it is in the exercise of clinical judgement and its application to individual patients that the outstanding physician is distinguished. This has become even more relevant as patients become increasingly welcomed as partners in a shared decision making process. This book translates the research and theory from (...)
     
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  12. Christopher M. Burkle, Paul S. Mueller, Keith M. Swetz, C. Hook & Mark T. Keegan (2012). Physician Perspectives and Compliance with Patient Advance Directives: The Role External Factors Play on Physician Decision Making. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):31-.score: 77.0
    Background Following passage of the Patient Self Determination Act in 1990, health care institutions that receive Medicare and Medicaid funding are required to inform patients of their right to make their health care preferences known through execution of a living will and/or to appoint a surrogate-decision maker. We evaluated the impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physicians’ decisions to honor or forgo previously established advance directives (ADs). In addition, physician views regarding legal risk, patients’ ability to comprehend (...)
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  13. Robert M. Veatch (2009). Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge. Oxford University Press.score: 75.0
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- Abandoning informed (...)
     
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  14. Harold Bursztajn (ed.) (1981/1990). Medical Choices, Medical Chances: How Patients, Families, and Physicians Can Cope with Uncertainty. Routledge.score: 72.0
     
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  15. K. Whitehorn (1975). Not Quite What the Patient Ordered. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):92-95.score: 72.0
    In the last of the group of papers from the conference on inatrogenic disease which we are publishing is this issue Katharine Whitehorn told the audience mainly of doctors and doctors in training - and tells many more through this Journal - what the patient expects from them. She envisages a generation of doctors who are coming to see their role rather differently from that of their fathers, and perhaps in the future a new medical scene.
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  16. Felicity Goodyear-Smith & Stephen Buetow (2001). Power Issues in the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Health Care Analysis 9 (4):449-462.score: 70.0
    Power is an inescapable aspect of all socialrelationships, and inherently is neither goodnor evil. Doctors need power to fulfil theirprofessional obligations to multipleconstituencies including patients, thecommunity and themselves. Patients need powerto formulate their values, articulate andachieve health needs, and fulfil theirresponsibilities. However, both parties canuse or misuse power. The ethical effectivenessof a health system is maximised by empoweringdoctors and patients to develop `adult-adult'rather than `adult-child' relationships thatrespect and enable autonomy, accountability,fidelity and humanity. Even in adult-adultrelationships, conflicts and complexitiesarise. Lack of (...)
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  17. Je Ffrey Blustein (1993). Doing What the Patient Orders: Maintaining Integrity in the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Bioethics 7 (4):289-314.score: 69.0
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  18. B. S. Elger (2009). Factors Influencing Attitudes Towards Medical Confidentiality Among Swiss Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):517-524.score: 69.0
    Medical confidentiality is a core concept of professionalism and should be an integral part of pregraduate and postgraduate medical education. The aim of our study was to define the factors influencing attitudes towards patient confidentiality in everyday situations in order to define the need for offering further education to various subgroups of physicians. All internists and general practitioners who were registered members of the association of physicians in Geneva or who were working in the department of internal medicine or in (...)
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  19. C. Behrendt, T. Gölz, C. Roesler, H. Bertz & A. Wünsch (2011). What Do Our Patients Understand About Their Trial Participation? Assessing Patients' Understanding of Their Informed Consent Consultation About Randomised Clinical Trials. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):74-80.score: 69.0
    Background Ethically, informed consent regarding randomised controlled trials (RCTs) should be understandable to patients. The patients can then give free consent or decline to participate in a RCT. Little is known about what patients really understand in consultations about RCTs. Methods Cancer patients who were asked to participate in a randomised trial were surveyed using a semi-standardised interview developed by the authors. The interview addresses understanding, satisfaction and needs of the patients. The sample included eight patients who participated in a (...)
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  20. T. M. Pope & M. Hexum (2012). Legal Briefing: Shared Decision Making and Patient Decision Aids. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (1):70-80.score: 69.0
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  21. H. McGough (1990). Finder's Fees May Compromise the Provider-Patient Relationship. Irb 13 (1-2):23-23.score: 69.0
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  22. Charlotte Williamson (2010). Towards the Emancipation of Patients: Patients' Experiences and the Patient Movement. Policy Press.score: 69.0
     
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  23. L. Raeve (1993). The Nurse Under Physician Authority: Commentary. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (4):228-229.score: 67.0
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  24. Eric J. Cassell (2004). The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 63.0
    Here is a thoroughly updated edition of a classic in palliative medicine. Two new chapters have been added to the 1991 edition, along with a new preface summarizing where progress has been made and where it has not in the area of pain management. This book addresses the timely issue of doctor-patient relationships arguing that the patient, not the disease, should be the central focus of medicine. Included are a number of compelling patient narratives. Praise for the first edition "Well (...)
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  25. Deborah Bowman (2011). Informed Consent: A Primer for Clinical Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 63.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: why focus on informed consent?; 2. Deciding who decides: capacity and consent; 3. Putting the informed into 'informed consent': information and decision-making; 4. Freedom of expression: the voluntary nature of consent; 5. A patient's prerogative? The continuing nature of consent; 6. Concluding words about consent; Index.
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  26. William E. Stempsey (1995). Incommensurability: Its Implications for the Patient/Physician Relation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):253-269.score: 63.0
    Scientific authority and physician authority are both challenged by Thomas Kuhn's concept of incommensurability. If competing "paradigms" or "world views" cannot rationally be compared, we have no means to judge the truth of any particular view. However, the notion of local or partial incommensurability might provide a framework for understanding the implications of contemporary philosophy of science for medicine. We distinguish four steps in the process of translating medical science into clinical decisions: the doing of the science, the appropriation of (...)
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  27. Nancy Berlinger (2005). After Harm: Medical Error and the Ethics of Forgiveness. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 63.0
    Medical error is a leading problem of health care in the United States. Each year, more patients die as a result of medical mistakes than are killed by motor vehicle accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. While most government and regulatory efforts are directed toward reducing and preventing errors, the actions that should follow the injury or death of a patient are still hotly debated. According to Nancy Berlinger, conversations on patient safety are missing several important components: religious voices, traditions, and (...)
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  28. Jerome Lowenstein (2005). The Midnight Meal and Other Essays About Doctors, Patients, and Medicine. University of Michigan Press.score: 63.0
    In this expanded edition, an accomplished physician and teacher of medicine discusses the importance of being a caring doctor, especially now that the focus of medicine is increasingly on technological innovation and health care costs. With wisdom and compassion, Dr. Jerome Lowenstein tells stories about relationships between medical students and their teachers, physicians and their patients. He reflects on what doctors learn from treating chronic illness; how they respond to patients' needs for reassurance; how they bear the burden of treating (...)
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  29. Atsushi Asai, Minako Kishino, Tsuguya Fukui, Masahiko Sakai, Masako Yokota, Kazumi Nakata, Sumiko Sasakabe, Kiyomi Sawada & Fumie Kaiji (1998). Choices of Japanese Patients in the Face of Disagreement. Bioethics 12 (2):162–172.score: 63.0
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  30. Reidar Pedersen (2008). Empathy: A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):325-335.score: 63.0
    Empathy is generally regarded as important and positive. However, descriptions of empathy are often inadequate and deceptive. Furthermore, there is a widespread lack of critical attention to such deficiencies. This critical review of the medical discourse of empathy shows that tendencies to evade and misrepresent the understanding subject are common. The understanding subject’s contributions to the empathic process are often neglected or described as something that can and should be avoided or controlled. Furthermore, the intrinsic and closely interwoven relationship between (...)
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  31. E. G. Howe (2008). Increasing Consensus with Patients and Their Loved Ones. Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (1):3-12.score: 63.0
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  32. David Katerndahl & Michael L. Parchman (2010). Dynamical Difference in Patients Encounters Involving Uncontrolled Diabetes: An Orbital Decomposition Analysis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (1):211-219.score: 63.0
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  33. R. M. Veatch & W. E. Stempsey (1995). Incommensurability: Its Implications for the Patient/Physician Relation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):253-269.score: 63.0
    Scientific authority and physician authority are both challenged by Thomas Kuhn's concept of incommensurability. If competing “paradigms” or “world views” cannot rationally be compared, we have no means to judge the truth of any particular view. However, the notion of local or partial incommensurability might provide a framework for understanding the implications of contemporary philosophy of science for medicine. We distinguish four steps in the process of translating medical science into clinical decisions: the doing of the science, the appropriation of (...)
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  34. Arthur W. Frank (2004). The Renewal of Generosity: Illness, Medicine, and How to Live. University of Chicago Press.score: 61.0
    Contemporary health care often lacks generosity of spirit, even when treatment is most efficient. Too many patients are left unhappy with how they are treated, and too many medical professionals feel estranged from the calling that drew them to medicine. Arthur W. Frank tells the stories of ill people, doctors, and nurses who are restoring generosity to medicine--generosity toward others and to themselves. The Renewal of Generosity evokes medicine as the face-to-face encounter that comes before and after diagnostics, pharmaceuticals, and (...)
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  35. Gary B. Weiss (1984). Patient Truthfulness: A Test of Models of the Physician-Patient Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4):353-372.score: 61.0
    Little attention has been given in medical ethics literature to issues relating to the truthfulness of patients. Beginning with an actual medical case, this paper first explores truth-telling by doctors and patients as related to two prominent models of the physician-patient relationship. Utilizing this discussion and the literature on the truthfulness and accuracy of the information patients convey to doctors, these models are then critically assessed. It is argued that the patient agency (patient autonomy or contractual) model is inherently (...)
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  36. Jonathan Breslin, Susan MacRae, Jennifer Bell & Peter Singer (2005). Top 10 Health Care Ethics Challenges Facing the Public: Views of Toronto Bioethicists. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-8.score: 61.0
    Background There are numerous ethical challenges that can impact patients and families in the health care setting. This paper reports on the results of a study conducted with a panel of clinical bioethicists in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the purpose of which was to identify the top ethical challenges facing patients and their families in health care. A modified Delphi study was conducted with twelve clinical bioethicist members of the Clinical Ethics Group of the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics. (...)
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  37. Fiona Randall (1996). Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion. Oxford University Press.score: 61.0
    Palliative care is a recent branch of health care. The doctors, nurses, and other professionals involved in it took their inspiration from the medieval idea of the hospice, but have now extended their expertise to every area of health care: surgeries, nursing homes, acute wards, and the community. This has happened during a period when patients wish to take more control over their own lives and deaths, resources have become scarce, and technology has created controversial life-prolonging treatments. Palliative care is (...)
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  38. Jerome P. Kassirer (2005). On the Take: How America's Complicity with Big Business Can Endanger Your Health. Oxford University Press.score: 61.0
    We all know that doctors accept gifts from drug companies, ranging from pens and coffee mugs to free vacations at luxurious resorts. But as the former Editor-in-Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine reveals in this shocking expose, these innocuous-seeming gifts are just the tip of an iceberg that is distorting the practice of medicine and jeopardizing the health of millions of Americans today. In On the Take, Dr. Jerome Kassirer offers an unsettling look at the pervasive payoffs that (...)
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  39. A. Hessling & S. Schicktanz (2012). What German Experts Expect From Individualized Medicine: Problems of Uncertainty and Future Complication in Physician-Patient Interaction. Clinical Ethics 7 (2):86-93.score: 61.0
    ‘Individualized medicine’ is an emerging paradigm in clinical life science research. We conducted a socio-empirical interview study in a leading German clinical research group, aiming at implementing ‘individualized medicine’ of colorectal cancer. The goal was to investigate moral and social issues related to physician–patient interaction and clinical care, and to identify the points raised, supported and rejected by the physicians and researchers. Up to now there has been only limited insight into how experts dedicated to individualized medicine view its problems. (...)
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  40. Ronald J. Christie (1986). Ethical Issues in Family Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 61.0
    While ethicists have directed much attention to controversial biomedical issues--including euthanasia, abortion, and genetic engineering--they have largely ignored the less obvious, but more pervasive, everyday ethical problems faced by family physicians. Ethical Issues in Family Medicine addresses these problems, offering an ethics that reflects the distinctive features of family practice, and helping family physicians to appreciate the extent to which ethical issues influence their practice.
     
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  41. Arndt Heßling & Silke Schicktanz (2012). What German Experts Expect From Individualized Medicine: Problems of Uncertainty and Future Complication in Physician–Patient Interaction. Clinical Ethics 7 (2):86-93.score: 61.0
    ‘Individualized medicine’ is an emerging paradigm in clinical life science research. We conducted a socio-empirical interview study in a leading German clinical research group, aiming at implementing ‘individualized medicine’ of colorectal cancer. The goal was to investigate moral and social issues related to physician–patient interaction and clinical care, and to identify the points raised, supported and rejected by the physicians and researchers. Up to now there has been only limited insight into how experts dedicated to individualized medicine view its problems. (...)
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  42. J. M. Little (1995). Humane Medicine. Cambridge University Press.score: 61.0
    In the late twentieth century the impressive achievements of modern medicine are obvious, yet medicine seems to have failed to satisfy public expectation. Government regulation of hospitals and doctors is tightening in most Western countries and health funding is a divisive political issue. Medical complaints departments are increasingly busy. In the United States medical litigation has reached alarming levels, and a similar trend can be seen in other developed countries. Is there something wrong with medical research and practice? This book, (...)
     
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  43. H. Y. Vanderpool & G. B. Weiss (1984). Patient Truthfulness: A Test of Models of the Physician-Patient Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4):353-372.score: 61.0
    Little attention has been given in medical ethics literature to issues relating to the truthfulness of patients. Beginning with an actual medical case, this paper first explores truth-telling by doctors and patients as related to two prominent models of the physician-patient relationship. Utilizing this discussion and the literature on the truthfulness and accuracy of the information patients convey to doctors, these models are then critically assessed. It is argued that the patient agency (patient autonomy or contractual) model is inherently (...)
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  44. Eric J. Cassell (1976/1985). The Healer's Art. Mit Press.score: 60.0
    " Dr. Cassell discusses the world of the sick, the healing connection and healer's battle, the role of omnipotence in the healer's art, illness and disease, and ...
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  45. Suzanne Shale (2012). Moral Leadership in Medicine: Building Ethical Healthcare Organizations. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Why medicine needs moral leaders; 2. Creating an organizational narrative; 3. Understanding normative expectations in medical moral leadership; Prologue to chapters four and five; 4. Expressing fiduciary, bureaucratic and collegial propriety; 5. Expressing inquisitorial and restorative propriety; Epilogue to chapters four and five; 6. Understanding organizational moral narrative; 7. Moral leadership for ethical organizations; Appendix 1. How the research was done; Appendix 2. Accountability for clinical performance: individuals and organisations; Appendix 3. A brief (...)
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  46. Beverly Woodward (2001). Confidentiality, Consent and Autonomy in the Physician-Patient Relationship. Health Care Analysis 9 (3):337-351.score: 60.0
    In the practice of medicine there has long been a conflict between patient management and respect for patient autonomy. In recent years this conflict has taken on a new form as patient management has increasingly been shifted from physicians to insurers, employers, and health care bureaucracies. The consequence has been a diminshment of both physician and patient autonomy and a parallel diminishment of medical record confidentiality. Although the new managers pay lip service to the rights of patients to confidentiality of (...)
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  47. David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.score: 60.0
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
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  48. Bernard Lo (1994). Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: A Guide for Clinicians. Williams & Wilkins.score: 60.0
    Highlights of this edition include: / Important new material addressing federal privacy regulations, disclosure of medical errors, limits on residents'...
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  49. Stephen G. Post (1997). The Fear of Forgetfulness: A Grassroots Approach to an Ethics of Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of Clinical Ethics 9 (1):71-80.score: 60.0
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  50. T. M. Krakower, M. Montello, C. Mitchell & R. D. Truog (2012). The Ethics of Reality Medical Television. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (1):50-57.score: 60.0
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