Year:

  1.  34
    Capital and Ideology, Thomas Piketty. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer. Harvard University Press, 2020, Pp. Ix + 1093.Elizabeth Anderson - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):150-156.
  2.  6
    The Option Value of Life.Susanne Burri - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):118-138.
    This paper argues that under conditions of uncertainty, there is frequently a positive option value to staying alive when compared to the alternative of dying right away. This value can make it prudentially rational for you to stay alive even if it appears highly unlikely that you have a bright future ahead of you. Drawing on the real options approach to investment analysis, the paper explores the conditions under which there is a positive option value to staying alive, and it (...)
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  3.  8
    Measuring Poverty Around the World, Anthony B. Atkinson. Princeton University Press, 2019, Xxvii + 464 Pages. [REVIEW]Lucio Esposito & Blanca Zuluaga - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):156-161.
  4.  13
    Ordeals, Women and Gender Justice.Anca Gheaus - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):8-22.
    Rationing health care by ordeals is likely to have different effects on women and men, and on distinct groups of women. I show how such putative effects of ordeals are relevant to achieving gender justice. I explain why some ordeals may disproportionately set back women’s interest in discretionary time, health and access to health care, and may undermine equality of opportunity for positions of advantage. Some ordeals protect the interests of the worse-off women yet set back the interests of better-off (...)
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  5.  3
    Ordeals, Inequalities, Moral Hazard and Non-Monetary Incentives in Health Care.Daniel M. Hausman - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):23-36.
    This essay begins by summarizing the reasons why unregulated health-care markets are inefficient. The inefficiencies stem from the asymmetries of information among providers, patients and payers, which give rise to moral hazard and adverse selection. Attempts to ameliorate these inefficiencies by means of risk-adjusted insurance and monetary incentives such as co-pays and deductibles lessen the inefficiencies at the cost of increasing inequalities. Another possibility is to rely on non-monetary incentives, including ordeals. While not a magic bullet, these are feasible methods (...)
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  6.  9
    Measuring Utility: From the Marginal Revolution to Behavioral Economics, Ivan Moscati. Oxford University Press, 2019, Vii + 326 Pages. [REVIEW]Catherine Herfeld - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):144-150.
  7.  5
    Putting Costs and Benefits of Ordeals Together.Anders Herlitz - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):37-49.
    This paper addresses how to think about the permissibility of introducing deadweight costs on candidate recipients of goods in order to attain better outcomes. The paper introduces some distinctions between different kinds of value dimensions that should be taken into account when such judgements are made and draws from the literature on comparisons across different value dimensions in order to canvas what sort of situations one might arguably face when evaluating ordeals. In light of the distinctions drawn and the possibilities (...)
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  8.  3
    Rationing with Time: Time-Cost Ordeals’ Burdens and Distributive Effects.Julie L. Rose - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):50-63.
    Individuals often face administrative hurdles in attempting to access health care, public programmes, and other legal statuses and entitlements. These ordeals are the products, directly or indirectly, of institutional and policy design choices. I argue that evaluating whether such ordeals are justifiable or desirable instruments of social policy depends on assessing, beyond their targeting effects, the process-related burdens they impose on those attempting to navigate them and these burdens’ distributive effects. I here examine specifically how ordeals that levy time costs (...)
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  9.  4
    Rationality, Uncertainty, and Unanimity: An Epistemic Critique of Contractarianism.Alexander Schaefer - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):82-117.
    This paper considers contractarianism as a method of justification. The analysis accepts the key tenets of contractarianism: expected utility maximization, unanimity as the criteria of acceptance, and social-scientific uncertainty of modelled agents. In addition to these three features, however, the analysis introduces a fourth feature: a criteria of rational belief formation, viz. Bayesian belief updating. Using a formal model, this paper identifies a decisive objection to contractarian justification. Insofar as contractarian projects approximate the Agreement Model, therefore, they fail to justify (...)
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  10.  4
    Reciprocity and the Art of Behavioural Public Policy, Adam Oliver. Cambridge University Press, 2019, Xvii + 194 Pages. - Escaping Paternalism: Rationality, Behavioural Economics and Public Policy, Mario J. Rizzo and Glen Whitman. Cambridge University Press, 2020, Xii + 496 Pages. [REVIEW]Robert Sugden - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):139-144.
  11.  4
    Strategic Sorting: The Role of Ordeals in Health Care.Richard Zeckhauser - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (1):64-81.
    Ordeals are burdens placed on individuals that yield no benefits to others; hence they represent a dead-weight loss. Ordeals – the most common is waiting time – play a prominent role in rationing health care. The recipients most willing to bear them are those receiving the greatest benefit from scarce health-care resources. Health care is heavily subsidized; hence, moral hazard leads to excess use. Ordeals are intended to discourage expenditures yielding little benefit while simultaneously avoiding the undesired consequences of rationing (...)
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