Year:

  1. What’s in, What’s Out? Towards a Rigorous Definition of the Boundaries of Benefit-Cost Analysis.Daniel Acland - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):34-50.
    Benefit-cost analysis is typically defined as an implementation of the potential Pareto criterion, which requires inclusion of any impact for which individuals have willingness to pay. This definition is incompatible with the exclusion of impacts such as rights and distributional concerns, for which individuals do have WTP. I propose a new definition: BCA should include only impacts for which consumer sovereignty should govern. This is because WTP implicitly preserves consumer sovereignty, and is thus only appropriate for ‘sovereignty-warranting’ impacts. I compare (...)
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  2.  1
    The Samaritan’s Curse: Moral Individuals and Immoral Groups.Kaushik Basu - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):132-151.
    In this paper, I revisit the question of how and in what sense can individuals comprising a group be held responsible for morally reprehensible behaviour by that group. The question is tackled by posing a counterfactual: what would happen if selfish individuals became moral creatures? A game called the Samaritan’s Curse is developed, which sheds light on the dilemma of group moral responsibility, and raises new questions concerning ‘conferred morality’ and self-fulfilling morals, and also forces us to question some implicit (...)
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  3.  2
    Rational Powers in Action: Instrumental Rationality and Extended Agency, Sergio Tenenbaum. Oxford University Press, 2020, Xii + 245 Pages. [REVIEW]Seamus Bradley - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):164-169.
  4.  1
    Social Choice Problems with Public Reason Proceduralism.Henrik D. Kugelberg - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):51-70.
    Most political liberals argue that only rules, policies and institutions that are part of society’s basic structure need to be justified with so-called public reasons. Laws enacted outside this set are legitimate if and when public reasons can justify the procedure that selects them. I argue that this view is susceptible to known problems from social choice theory. However, there are resources within political liberalism that could address them. If the scope of public reason is extended beyond the basic structure (...)
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  5.  1
    Global Health Impact: Extending Access to Essential Medicines, Nicole Hassoun. Oxford University Press, 2020, Xv + 301 Pages. [REVIEW]Erik Malmqvist - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):158-164.
  6.  2
    The Half Life of Economic Injustice.David Miles - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):71-107.
    This paper addresses a question which is fundamental to the perceived legitimacy of the distribution of resources today: to what extent does unfairness in how assets came to be acquired in the past affect incomes and wealth now? To answer that question requires two things: first, a principle to determine what is, and what is not, a just acquisition of wealth or a just source of income; second, a means of using that principle to estimate what fraction of wealth and (...)
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  7.  4
    Moral Uncertainty, by William MacAskill, Krister Bykvist and Toby Ord. Oxford University Press, 2020, Viii + 226 Pages. [REVIEW]Marcus Pivato - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):152-158.
  8.  1
    Biased Preferences Equilibrium.Ariel Rubinstein & Asher Wolinksy - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):24-33.
    We model economic environments in which individual choice sets are fixed and the level of a specific parameter that systematically modifies the preferences of all agents is determined endogenously to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium concept, Biased Preferences Equilibrium, is reminiscent of competitive equilibrium: agents’ choice sets and their preferences are independent of the behaviour of other agents, the combined choices must satisfy overall feasibility constraints and the endogenous adjustment of the equilibrating preference parameter is analogous to equilibrating price adjustment. The (...)
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  9.  1
    Good Reasons for Losers: Lottery Justification and Social Risk.Kai Spiekermann - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):108-131.
    Many goods are distributed by processes that involve randomness. In lotteries, randomness is used to promote fairness. When taking social risks, randomness is a feature of the process. The losers of such decisions ought to be given a reason why they should accept the outcome. Surprisingly, good reasons demand more than merely equal ex ante chances. What is also required is a true statement of the form: ‘the result could easily have gone the other way and you could have been (...)
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  10.  19
    The Principle of Merit and the Capital-Labour Split.Jeppe von Platz - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (1):1-23.
    Some meritocratic defenders of capitalism rely on the principle that cooperators should receive a share of the product commensurate with their contribution. However, such defences of capitalism fail due to a dilemma. Either they rely on an understanding of contribution that arguably will be reflected by the capital-labour split in suitably idealized capitalist economies, but cannot serve as a plausible standard of merit; or they rely on an interpretation of contribution that is a plausible standard of merit, but which won’t (...)
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