Year:

  1.  7
    On the International Investment Regime: A Critique From Equality.Shuk Ying Chan - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (2):202-226.
    The international investment regime has come under increasing scrutiny, with several developing countries withdrawing from bilateral investment treaties in recent years. A central worry raised by c...
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  2.  11
    Money Creation, Debt, and Justice.Peter Dietsch - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (2):151-179.
    Theories of justice rely on a variety of criteria to determine what social arrangements should be considered just. For most theories, the distribution of financial resources matters. However, they take the existence of money as a given and tend to ignore the way in which the creation of money impacts distributive justice. Those with access to collateral are favoured in the creation of credit or debt, which represents the main form of money today. Appealing to the idea that access to (...)
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  3.  15
    Who Should Fight Domination? Individual Responsibility and Structural Injustice.Dorothea Gädeke - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (2):180-201.
    Who is responsible for fighting domination? Answering this question, I argue, requires taking the structural dimension of domination seriously to avoid unwillingly reproducing domination in the nam...
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  4.  4
    Assessing Climate Policies: Catastrophe Avoidance and the Right to Sustainable Development.Darrel Moellendorf & Daniel Edward Callies - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (2):127-150.
    With the significant disconnect between the collective aim of limiting warming to well below 2°C and the current means proposed to achieve such an aim, the goal of this paper is to offer a moral assessment of prominent alternatives to current international climate policy. To do so, we’ll outline five different policy routes that could potentially bring the means and goal in line. Those five policy routes are: exceed 2°C; limit warming to less than 2°C by economic de-growth; limit warming (...)
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  5.  4
    Undercutting Justice – Why Legal Representation Should Not Be Allocated by the Market.Shai Agmon - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (1):99-123.
    The adversarial legal system is traditionally praised for its normative appeal: it protects individual rights; ensures an equal, impartial, and consistent application of the law; and, most importantly, its competitive structure facilitates the discovery of truth – both in terms of the facts, and in terms of the correct interpretation of the law. At the same time, legal representation is allocated as a commodity, bought and sold in the market: the more one pays, the better legal representation one gets. In (...)
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  6.  2
    Dealing Fairly with Trade Imbalances in Monetary Unions.Marco Meyer - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (1):45-66.
    Politicians around the globe wrangle about how to deal with trade imbalances. In the Eurozone, members running a trade deficit accuse members running a surplus of forcing them into deficit. Yet pol...
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  7.  9
    With Group Power Comes Great (Individual) Responsibility.Erin L. Miller - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (1):22-44.
    When a group does harm, sometimes there’s no obvious individual who bears moral responsibility, and yet we still intuit that someone is to blame. This apparent ‘deficit’ of moral responsibility has led some scholars to posit that groups themselves can be responsible, and that this responsibility is distributed in some uniform fashion among group members. This solution to the deficit, however, risks providing a scapegoat for individuals who have acted wrongly and shifting blame onto those who have not. Instead, this (...)
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