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Abigail Gosselin
Regis University
  1.  51
    Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility.Abigail Gosselin - 2018 - Social Philosophy Today 34:77-94.
    In this paper I explore the way that mental illness stigma impacts epistemic credibility in people who have mental illness. While any kind of stigma has the potential to discredit a person’s epistemic agency, in the case of mental illness the basis for discrediting is in some cases and to some extent justifiable, for impairments in rationality, control, and reality perception can indeed be obstacles to participating appropriately in epistemic activities such as normal conversation and public discourse. People with mental (...)
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  2.  34
    Global Poverty and Responsibility: Identifying the Duty-Bearers of Human Rights. [REVIEW]Abigail Gosselin - 2006 - Human Rights Review 8 (1):35-52.
    Many rights theorists argue that global poverty violates certain human rights, so that responsibility to address poverty involves carrying out the duties that correspond with relevant rights-claims. Liberatirians argue that the rights and duties associated with global poverty, especially what are sometimes thought of as “positive” rights, or rights of assistance, are inappropriately agent-neutral, giving them less justificatory force than agent-relative rights and duties. To counter libertarian concerns, Thomas Pogge tries to reframe the responsibilities corresponding to human rights as institutional (...)
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  3.  9
    At Home in a Psychiatric Hospital.Abigail Gosselin - 2020 - Social Philosophy Today 36:71-87.
    People who have mental illness are in particular need of what a home can provide, but they are especially vulnerable to not being in a place with a home-like environment, whether due to homelessness, incarceration, or hospitalization. At any given time, approximately 170,000 people are inpatients in psychiatric units or hospitals. Psychiatric hospitals are not homes, and they are not designed for long-term stay. The main purpose of the modern psychiatric hospital is to stabilize people in mental health crises, such (...)
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  4.  62
    Addiction Narratives: Background Assumptions and Policy Implications.Abigail Gosselin - 2012 - Social Philosophy Today 28:47-66.
    The predominant narratives of addiction—Disease and Choice narratives—frame addiction as a personal problem to be addressed by controlling an individual’s behavior. By analyzing the epistemic function of narratives of addiction, this paper shows that these narratives construct a story about the nature of addiction by assuming simplistic views about human agency, leading to drug policies that narrowly focus on individual behavior. Assumptions embedded within narratives must be made transparent so that the partial, perspectival, and situated nature of the knowledge that (...)
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  5.  3
    Addiction Narratives: Background Assumptions and Policy Implications.Abigail Gosselin - 2012 - Social Philosophy Today 28:47-66.
    The predominant narratives of addiction—Disease and Choice narratives—frame addiction as a personal problem to be addressed by controlling an individual’s behavior. By analyzing the epistemic function of narratives of addiction, this paper shows that these narratives construct a story about the nature of addiction by assuming simplistic views about human agency, leading to drug policies that narrowly focus on individual behavior. Assumptions embedded within narratives must be made transparent so that the partial, perspectival, and situated nature of the knowledge that (...)
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  6.  16
    “Clinician Knows Best”? Injustices in the Medicalization of Mental Illness.Abigail Gosselin - 2019 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 5 (2).
    This paper uses a non-ideal theory approach advocated for by Alison Jaggar to show that practices involved with the medicalization of serious mental disorders can subject people who have these disorders to a cycle of vulnerability that keeps them trapped within systems of injustice. When medicalization locates mental disorders solely as problems of individual biology, without regard to social factors, and when it treats mental disorders as personal defects, it perpetuates injustice in several ways: by enabling biased diagnoses through stereotyping, (...)
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  7.  20
    Global Poverty and Individual Responsibility.Abigail Gosselin - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    This book considers what responsibilities affluent individuals have toward global poverty, given that global poverty is a problem with structural, political causes, and one that generally requires collective action. By looking at the intersection of moral, political, and legal philosophy, this book gives a pluralistic and differentiated account of individual duties based on a person's moral agency, her roles within collective groups , and her institutional identities as citizen and consumer.
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  8.  26
    Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility in Advance.Abigail Gosselin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  9.  25
    Philosophizing From Experience: First‐Person Accounts and Epistemic Justice.Abigail Gosselin - 2019 - Journal of Social Philosophy 50 (1):45-68.
  10.  33
    The Epistemic Function of Narratives and the Globalization of Mental Disorders.Abigail Gosselin - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):46-67.
    Mental disorders are assessed globally using the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases Classification of Mentaland Behavioural Disorders (ICD), which is largely modeled after (though it also influences) the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) used in the United States. Situated within the scientific narrative of American psychiatry, disorders are typically viewed by practitioners who use the DSM and ICD as essential categories of human experience, with internal, purely descriptive, value-free conditions. Criteria identified in the DSM and (...)
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  11.  3
    The Epistemic Function of Narratives and the Globalization of Mental Disorders.Abigail Gosselin - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):46-67.
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  12.  12
    The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism is Changing Ideas About Living Ethically, by Peter Singer. [REVIEW]Abigail Gosselin - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):235-238.
  13.  13
    The Sword, the Cross, and the Pen: Controlling the Abject Through Self-Creation.Abigail Gosselin - 2007 - International Studies in Philosophy 39 (4):35-50.
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