19 found
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  1.  22
    Whatever happened to empathy?: introduction.Douglas Hollan & C. Jason Throop - 2008 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 36 (4):385-401.
  2.  32
    On Inaccessibility and Vulnerability: Some Horizons of Compatibility between Phenomenology and Psychoanalysis.C. Jason Throop - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (1):75-96.
  3.  39
    Attention, ritual glitches, and attentional pull: the president and the queen.C. Jason Throop & Alessandro Duranti - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):1055-1082.
    This article proposes an analysis of a ritual glitch and resulting “misfire” from the standpoint of a phenomenologically informed anthropology of human interaction. Through articulating a synthesis of some of Husserl‘s insights on attention and affection with concepts and methods developed by anthropologists and other students of human interaction, a case is made for the importance of understanding the social organization of attention in ritual encounters. An analysis of a failed toast during President Obama’s 2011 State Visit to the United (...)
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  4.  13
    Toward an Anthropology of the Will.Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.) - 2010 - Stanford University Press.
    The contributors to this book draw upon their unique insights and research experience to address fundamental questions, including: What forms does the will take ...
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  5.  5
    Experience, Coherence, and Culture: The Significance of Dilthey's 'Descriptive Psychology' for the Anthropology of Consciousness.C. Jason Throop - 2002 - Anthropology of Consciousness 13 (1):2-26.
    This paper explores Dilthey's "descriptive psychology "and its significance for the anthropology of consciousness. To do justice to the complexities of Dilthey's project a significant portion of the paper is devoted to an exposition of the basic tenets of his"descriptive psychology." Most notably, his views on"experience,""aconsciousness,""introspection,"and"objectified mind"are discussed before turning to examine his concept of the"acquired psychicnexus." After outlining these basic tenets the paper turns to explore how Dilthey's "descriptive psychology"can serve to shed light on current anthropological research on the (...)
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  6.  27
    Bruner's search for meaning: A conversation between psychology and anthropology.Cheryl Mattingly, Nancy C. Lutkehaus & C. Jason Throop - 2008 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 36 (1):1-28.
  7. Imagination and Reality: On the Relations Between Myth, Consciousness, and the Quantum Sea.Charles D. Laughlin & C. Jason Throop - 2001 - Zygon 36 (4):709-736.
    There often appears to be a striking correspondence between mythic stories and aspects of reality. We will examine the processes of creative imagination within a neurobiological frame and suggest a theory that may explain the functions of myth in relation to the hidden aspects of reality. Myth is peppered with archetypal entities and interactions that operate to reveal hidden processes in reality that are relative to the human condition. The imagery in myths in a sense “sustains the true.” That is, (...)
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  8.  23
    On the problem of empathy: The case of Yap, Federated States of Micronesia.C. Jason Throop - 2008 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 36 (4):402-426.
  9.  93
    Husserlian meditations and anthropological reflections: Toward a cultural neurophenomenology of experience and reality.Charles D. Laughlin & C. Jason Throop - 2009 - Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (2):130-170.
    Most of us would agree that the world of our experience is different than the extramental reality of which we are a part. Indeed, the evidence pertaining to cultural cosmologies around the globe suggests that virtually all peoples recognize this distinction—hence the focus upon the "hidden" forces behind everyday events. That said, the struggle to comprehend the relationship between our consciousness and reality, even the reality of ourselves, has led to controversy and debate for centuries in Western philosophy. In this (...)
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  10. Anthropology of consciousness.C. Jason Throop & Charles D. Laughlin - 2007 - In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press. pp. 631-669.
  11.  30
    Shifting from a constructivist to an experiential approach to the anthropology of self and emotion.C. Jason Throop - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (3):27-52.
    This paper investigates the limits of the constructivist approach to the study of self and emotion in anthropology and outlines a viable alternative to this perspective, namely an experiential approach. The roots of the experiential and constructivist approaches to self and emotion in anthropology are traced to the work of William James and George Herbert Mead respectively. The limitations of the constructivist perspective are explored through a discussion of James's radical empirical doctrine, Anthony P. Cohen's work on creative self-consciousness, and (...)
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  12.  13
    Willing contours : Locating volition in anthropological theory.Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop - 2010 - In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press.
    This chapter is concerned with an analysis of the etymology of the English term “will,” which is used to emphasize some possible sedimented assumptions with its meaning in English-speaking European and North American academic communities. It takes a look at two general philosophical approaches to the will and examines the will in early modern social theory. From here the chapter turns to anthropology to study two of the most generative approaches to willing in modern culture theory: practice theoretical and psychocultural (...)
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  13.  7
    In the midst of action.C. Jason Throop - 2010 - In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press. pp. 28.
    This chapter discusses a phenomenologically grounded approach to willing based on Henri Burgson, Paul Ricoeur, and Alfred Schutz's writings. It claims that this approach to willing can have a significant impact in informing anthropological theorizing and research, due to the assumptions related to a number of distinct phenomenal aspects of willing. It also proposes three experiential correlates of willing: sense of own-ness, anticipation/goal directedness, and effortful-ness.
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  14. Sacred Suffering : A Phenomenological Anthropological Perspective.C. Jason Throop - 2015 - In Kalpana Ram & Christopher Houston (eds.), Phenomenology in Anthropology: A Sense of Perspective. Indiana University Press.
  15.  67
    Hypocognition, a “Sense of the Uncanny,” and the Anthropology of Ambiguity: Reflections on Robert I. Levy's Contribution to Theories of Experience in Anthropology.C. Jason Throop - 2005 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 33 (4):499-511.
  16.  9
    Experience, culture, and reality: The significance of Fisher information for understanding the relationship between alternative states of consciousness and the structures of reality.Charles D. Laughlin & C. Jason Throop - 2003 - International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 22 (1):7-26.
    The majority of the world’s cultures encourage or require members to enter alternative states of consciousness while involved in religious rituals. The question is, why? This paper suggests an explanation for the culturally prescribed ASC from the view of Fisher information. It argues from the position, first put forward by Emile Durkheim in his magnum opus, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life, that all religions are grounded in reality. It suggests that many of the structural elements of cultural cosmologies (...)
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  17. Think pieces.C. Jason Throop - 2001 - Zygon 36 (3-4):579.
     
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  18.  6
    Introduction to the Special Issue.Jarrett Zigon & C. Jason Throop - 2022 - Puncta 5 (2):1-7.
    In the spring and summer of 2020, the world broke down. A worldly breakdown often gives rise to forms of moral breakdown, or those “moments” when some worldly event or occurrence forces a person or persons to critically reflect on their until then unquestioned way of being-in-the-world (Zigon 2007). From the persistence of the global pandemic, to the collapse of the economy, to the murder of George Floyd by police officers on camera, to the worldwide response to that injustice, the (...)
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  19.  16
    Philosophers since the time of the ancientGreekshave tended to categorize subjective expe-rience according to three basic faculties. These include the faculty of percep-tion (cognition, intellection, memory), the faculty of feeling (emotion, affect, sensation), and the faculty of will (volition, conflation, intention). While this tripartite set has long informed philosophical and later psychological models of the fundamental structures of subjective experience, the faculty of will has remained largely ... [REVIEW]C. Jason Throop - 2010 - In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press. pp. 28.