Results for 'Cerebral Cortex'

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  1. Cerebral cortex as model builder.H. B. Barlow - 1985 - In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: Wiley. pp. 37--46.
  2. The cerebral cortex and consciousness.W. Penfield - 1937 - In The Harvey Lectures.
  3. The cerebral cortex and its work.Henry Maudsley - 1890 - Mind 15 (58):161-190.
  4.  9
    The cerebral cortex and conscious kinaesthetic and tensional information.P. E. Roland - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):167-171.
  5.  38
    Sensory feedback to the cerebral cortex during voluntary movement in man.P. E. Roland - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):129-147.
  6. Consciousness without a cerebral cortex.Björn Merker - 2008 - In Hans Liljenström & Peter Århem (eds.), Consciousness transitions: phylogenetic, ontogenetic, and physiological aspects. Boston: Elsevier.
  7.  27
    Organizational levels of the cerebral cortex: An integrated model.Yves Burnod - 1991 - Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4):351-361.
    We propose a theoretical model of the cerebral cortex which is based on its cellular components and integrates its different levels of organization: (1) cells have general adaptive and memorization properties; (2) cortical columns are repetitive interneuronal circuits which determine an adaptive processing specific to the cerebral cortex; (3) cortical maps effect selective combinations which are very efficient to learn basic behaviourial adaptations such as invariant recognition of forms, visually-guided hand movements, or execution of structured motor (...)
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  8.  40
    Cerebellar networks with the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia.Andreea C. Bostan, Richard P. Dum & Peter L. Strick - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (5):241-254.
  9.  6
    Two views of the cerebral cortex.V. Braitenberg - 1986 - In G. Palm & A. Aertsen (eds.), Brain Theory. Springer. pp. 81--96.
  10. Division of the Cerebral Cortex into Lobes.S. H. Cardoso - forthcoming - Brain and Mind.
     
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  11.  12
    Consciousness and the cerebral cortex.A. C. Webb - 1970 - British Journal of Anaesthesia 55:209-19.
  12.  12
    Microtubules in the cerebral cortex: role in memory and consciousness.Nancy J. Woolf - 2006 - In J. Tuszynski (ed.), The Emerging Physics of Consciousness. Springer Verlag. pp. 49--94.
  13. Studies of the cerebral cortex of man: a review and an interpretation.Wilder Penfield - 1954 - In J. F. Delafresnaye (ed.), Brain Mechanisms and Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 284--309.
     
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  14.  12
    5 Patterning of the Cerebral Cortex.Sonia Garel & John Lr Rubenstein - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press.
  15. Cajal on the Cerebral Cortex: An Annotated Translation of the Complete Writings.Edward G. Jones, Neely Swanson, Larry W. Swanson, E. Horne Craigie & Juan Cano - 1991 - Journal of the History of Biology 24 (3):540-542.
     
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  16. Physiology of the cerebral cortex: Reduction versus emergence.A. Granato - 2005 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 97 (2):197-210.
     
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  17. The role of the cerebral cortex in the development and maintenance of consciousness.N. Kleitman - 1955 - In H. A. Abramson (ed.), Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Third Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  18. The search of “canonical” explanations for the cerebral cortex.Alessio Plebe - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):40.
    This paper addresses a fundamental line of research in neuroscience: the identification of a putative neural processing core of the cerebral cortex, often claimed to be “canonical”. This “canonical” core would be shared by the entire cortex, and would explain why it is so powerful and diversified in tasks and functions, yet so uniform in architecture. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the search for canonical explanations over the past 40 years, discussing the theoretical frameworks (...)
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  19. The effect of silent thinking on the cerebral cortex.John C. Eccles - 1987 - In B. Gulyas (ed.), The Brain-Mind Problem: Philosophical and Neurophysiological Approaches. Leuven University Press.
    The materialist critics argue that insuperable difficulties are encountered by the hypothesis that immaterial mental events such as thinking can act in any way on material structures such as neurons of the cerebral cortex, as is diagrammed in Fig. 8. Such a presumed action is alleged to be incompatible with the conservation laws of physics, in particular of the First Law of Thermodynamics. This objection would certainly be sustained by 19th century physicists and by neuroscientists and philosophers who (...)
     
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  20.  5
    Connecting the Cerebral Cortex with the Artist's Eyes, Mind and Culture.Amy Ione - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):21-27.
    V.S. Ramachandran and William Hirstein's thought-provoking article ‘The science of art: a neurological theory of aesthetic experience’ and the accompanying commentaries raise serious questions about what a science of art is. Unfortunately this short piece will only be able to address them broadly. Overall the problems arise from the exclusion of neurological studies of artists, the exclusion of the artist's experience, and the premises of the theory, which are based on problematic valuations related to aesthetics and spirituality. With these valuations, (...)
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  21.  28
    The cerebellum and cerebral cortex: Contrasting and converging contributions to spatial navigation and memory.Shane M. O'Mara - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):469-470.
    Thach's target article presents a remarkable overview and integration of animal and human studies on the functions of the cerebellum and makes clear theoretical predictions for both the normal operation of the cerebellum and for the effects of cerebellar lesions in the mature human. Commentary is provided on three areas, namely, spatial navigation, implicit learning, and cerebellar agenesis to elicit further development of the themes already present in Thach's paper, [THACH].
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  22. Computational capacity of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex.Danko D. Georgiev, Stefan K. Kolev, Eliahu Cohen & James F. Glazebrook - 2020 - Brain Research 1748:147069.
    The electric activities of cortical pyramidal neurons are supported by structurally stable, morphologically complex axo-dendritic trees. Anatomical differences between axons and dendrites in regard to their length or caliber reflect the underlying functional specializations, for input or output of neural information, respectively. For a proper assessment of the computational capacity of pyramidal neurons, we have analyzed an extensive dataset of three-dimensional digital reconstructions from the NeuroMorphoOrg database, and quantified basic dendritic or axonal morphometric measures in different regions and layers of (...)
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  23. The Fuzzy Brain. Vagueness and Mapping Connectivity in the Human Cerebral Cortex.Philipp Haueis - 2012 - Frontiers in Neuroanatomy 37 (6).
    While the past century of neuroscientific research has brought considerable progress in defining the boundaries of the human cerebral cortex, there are cases in which the demarcation of one area from another remains fuzzy. Despite the existence of clearly demarcated areas, examples of gradual transitions between areas are known since early cytoarchitectonic studies. Since multi-modal anatomical approaches and functional connectivity studies brought renewed attention to the topic, a better understanding of the theoretical and methodological implications of fuzzy boundaries (...)
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  24. "The great mixing machine”: multisensory integration and brain-breath coupling in the cerebral cortex.Varga Somogy & Heck Detlef - 2022 - Pflügers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology 475:5-14.
    It is common to distinguish between “holist” and “reductionist” views of brain function, where the former envisions the brain as functioning as an indivisible unit and the latter as a collection of distinct units that serve different functions. Opposing reductionism, a number of researchers have pointed out that cortical network architecture does not respect functional boundaries, and the neuroanatomist V. Braitenberg proposed to understand the cerebral cortex as a “great mixing machine” of neuronal activity from sensory inputs, motor (...)
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  25.  19
    Genomic divergence and brain evolution: How regulatory DNA influences development of the cerebral cortex.Debra L. Silver - 2016 - Bioessays 38 (2):162-171.
    The cerebral cortex controls our most distinguishing higher cognitive functions. Human‐specific gene expression differences are abundant in the cerebral cortex, yet we have only begun to understand how these variations impact brain function. This review discusses the current evidence linking non‐coding regulatory DNA changes, including enhancers, with neocortical evolution. Functional interrogation using animal models reveals converging roles for our genome in key aspects of cortical development including progenitor cell cycle and neuronal signaling. New technologies, including iPS (...)
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  26.  53
    Doing it . . . wild? On the role of the cerebral cortex in human sexual activity.Janniko R. Georgiadis - 2012 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Background: We like to think about sexual activity as something fixed, basic and primal. However, this does not seem to fully capture reality. Even when we relish sex, we may be capable of mentalizing, talking, voluntarily postponing orgasm, and much more. This might indicate that the central control mechanisms of sexual activity are quite flexible and susceptible to learning mechanisms, and that cortical brain areas play a critical part. Objective: This study aimed to identify those cortical areas and mechanisms most (...)
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  27.  72
    Reciprocity between the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex: Nonlinear dynamics in microscopic modules for generating voluntary motor commands.Jun Wang, Gregory Dam, Sule Yildirim, William Rand, Uri Wilensky & James C. Houk - 2008 - Complexity 14 (2):29-45.
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  28.  11
    Functions of neuronal networks in the hippocampus and of backprojections in the cerebral cortex in memory.Edmund T. Rolls - 1990 - In J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.), Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press. pp. 184--210.
  29.  22
    Bilateral integrative action of the cerebral cortex in man in verbal association and sensori-motor coordination.Karl U. Smith - 1947 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (5):367.
  30.  50
    Rhythmicity in the EEG and global stabilization of the average level of excitation in the cerebral cortex.M. N. Zhadin - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):309-310.
    The network model of EEG formation has revealed a unified mechanism for disparate EEG phenomena: for various reactions as well as for ontogenetic and phylogenetic differences. EEG rhythmicity was shown to be an external manifestation of the functioning of the intracortical stabilizing system which provides normal informational operations in the cerebral cortex.
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  31.  15
    Some effects of 'mental set' on the electrophysiological processes of the human cerebral cortex.J. R. Knott - 1939 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (4):384.
  32. Localization of function in the cerebral cortex and the unity and self-organization of the brain.Bruno [Y.] Eduardo Césarman Estañol - 1995 - Ludus Vitalis 3 (5):181-191.
     
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  33.  23
    Laminar cortical dynamics of cognitive and motor working memory, sequence learning and performance: Toward a unified theory of how the cerebral cortex works.Stephen Grossberg & Lance R. Pearson - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (3):677-732.
  34.  18
    О Dynamics of Attentional Modulation in Visual Cerebral Cortex.John Hr Maunsell & Geoffrey M. Ghose - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press.
  35. Yves Burnod, An Adaptive Neural Network: The Cerebral Cortex.W. Duch - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7:144-147.
  36.  10
    General Psychopathology, Cognition, and the Cerebral Cortex in 10-Year-Old Children: Insights From the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study.Yash Patel, Nadine Parker, Giovanni A. Salum, Zdenka Pausova & Tomáš Paus - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    General psychopathology and cognition are likely to have a bidirectional influence on each other. Yet, the relationship between brain structure, psychopathology, and cognition remains unclear. This brief report investigates the association between structural properties of the cerebral cortex [surface area, cortical thickness, intracortical myelination indexed by the T1w/T2w ratio, and neurite density assessed by restriction spectrum imaging ] with general psychopathology and cognition in a sample of children from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. Higher levels of psychopathology (...)
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  37.  32
    The steady-state response of the cerebral cortex to the beat of music reflects both the comprehension of music and attention.Benjamin Meltzer, Chagit S. Reichenbach, Chananel Braiman, Nicholas D. Schiff, A. J. Hudspeth & Tobias Reichenbach - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  38.  11
    3 Setting the Stage for Cognition: Genesis of the Primate Cerebral Cortex.Pasko Rakic, A. N. G. Sbc & Joshua Breunig - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press. pp. 33.
  39.  10
    33 Basal Ganglia and Cerebellar Circuits with the Cerebral Cortex.Peter L. Strick - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press. pp. 453.
  40. Vision and movement mechanisms in the cerebral cortex.David P. Carey - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (6):237-237.
  41.  10
    The cognitive significance of resonating neurons in the cerebral cortex.David LaBerge & Ray Kasevich - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1523-1550.
  42. Functions of neuronal networks in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in memory.E. T. Rolls - 1989 - In Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.), Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press. pp. 15--33.
     
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  43.  7
    8 Long-Term Plasticity of Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission in the Cerebral Cortex.Robert A. Crozier, Benjamin D. Philpot, Nathaniel B. Sawtell & Mark F. Bear - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press.
  44.  5
    Precursor cell types in the germinal zone of the cerebral cortex.Brenda P. Williams - 1995 - Bioessays 17 (5):391-393.
    Retroviral lineage tracing experiments suggest that the cortical ventricular zone is composed of a mixture of precursor cell types. The majority generate a single cell type (neurones, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes) and the remainder generate neurones and a single type of glial cell. Pluripotential precursor cells, that have the ability to generate all three cell types, are not observed. A recent paper, however, reports that when single ventricular zone cells are cultured in isolation, a small percentage of these cells are pluripotential(1). (...)
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  45.  11
    The sensory motor functions of the central convolutions of the cerebral cortex.No Authorship Indicated - 1894 - Psychological Review 1 (4):422-422.
  46. II Patterns of Activity II in the Cerebral Cortex II Related to Memory Functions.David H. Ingvar - 1979 - In L. Nilsson (ed.), Perspectives on Memory Research. pp. 247.
     
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  47. A possible neural mechanism underlying consciousness based on the pattern processing capabilities of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex.R. D. Orpwood - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical Biology 169:403-18.
  48.  30
    Contribution of plasticity of sensorimotor cerebral cortex to development of communication skills.Barry J. Sessle & Dongyuan Yao - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):638-639.
    Several lines of evidence have underscored the remarkable neuroplasticity of the primate sensorimotor cortex, characterizing these cortical areas as dynamic constructs that are modelled in a use-dependent manner by behaviourally significant experiences. Their plasticity likely provides a neural substrate that may contribute to the dynamic systems paradigm argued by Shanker & King (S&K) as crucial for development of communication skills.
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  49. Blending in language, conceptual structure, and the cerebral cortex.Rick Grush - manuscript
    0. Introduction The past decade has seen Cognitive Linguistics (CL) emerge as an important, exciting and promising theoretical alternative to Chomskyan approaches to the study of language. Even so, sheer numbers and institutional inertia make it the case that most current neurolinguistic research either assumes that the Chomskyan formalist story is more or less correct (and thus that the task of neurolinguistics is to determine how the brain implements GB, for instance), or that the there are two possibilities, Chomskyanism or (...)
     
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  50. Gaba-peptide Neurons Of The Primate Cerebral Cortex.Edward Jones - 1987 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 8 (4).
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