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Eva M. Dadlez [8]Eva Dadlez [5]
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Eva Dadlez
University of Central Oklahoma
  1. Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure.Eva M. Dadlez - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
  2. What's Hecuba to Him?: Fictional Events and Actual Emotions.Eva M. Dadlez - 1997 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The goal of this dissertation is to demonstrate that construals of our emotional responses to fictions as irrational or merely pseudo-emotional are not the only explanations available to us, and that necessary and sufficient conditions for an emotional response to a fiction can be established without abandoning either its intentionality or the assignment of a causal role to our beliefs. ;Colin Radford's claim that our emotional responses to fictions are irrational and inconsistent is challenged in two ways. First, distinctions can (...)
     
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  3.  2
    Comedy and Tragedy as Two Sides of the Same Coin: Reversal and Incongruity as Sources of Insight.Eva Dadlez & Daniel Lüthi - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):81.
    In Umberto Eco’s classic novel The Name of the Rose, we are introduced to a decidedly Platonic fear of laughter. According to the blind librarian Jorge de Burgos, “[l]aughter is weakness, corruption, the foolishness of our flesh. It is the peasant’s entertainment, the drunkard’s license;... laughter remains base, a defense for the simple, a mystery desecrated for the plebeians.”1 Laughter could not accompany insight or clarity or revelation. By destroying the last known copy of the second part of Aristotle’s Poetics, (...)
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  4.  50
    The Vicious Habits of Entirely Fictive People: Hume on the Moral Evaluation of Art.Eva M. Dadlez - 2002 - Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):143-156.
  5.  63
    Ideal Presence: How Kames Solved the Problem of Fiction and Emotion.Eva Dadlez - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):115-133.
    The problem of fiction and emotion is the problem of how we can be moved by the contemplation of fictional events and the plight of fictional characters when we know that the former have not occurred and the latter do not exist. I will give a general sketch of the philosophical treatment of the issue in the present day, and then turn to the eighteenth century for a solution as effective as the best that are presently on offer. The solution (...)
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  6.  19
    Comments on Deborah K. Heikes'.Eva M. Dadlez - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):31-35.
  7.  7
    A Humean Approach to the Problem of Disgust and Aesthetic Appreciation.Eva M. Dadlez - 2016 - Essays in Philosophy 17 (1):55-67.
    Carolyn Korsmeyer has offered some compelling arguments for the role of disgust in aesthetic appreciation. In the course of this project, she considers and holds up for justifiable criticism the account of emotional conversion proposed by David Hume in “Of Tragedy”. I will consider variant interpretations of Humean conversion and pinpoint a proposal that may afford an explanation of the ways in which aesthetic absorption can depend on and be intensified by the emotion of disgust.
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  8.  17
    Comments on Deborah K. Heikes' "Let's Be Reasonable.Eva M. Dadlez - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):31-35.
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  9.  16
    Kames on Ideal Presence.Eva Dadlez - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):17-25.
    The problem of fiction and emotion is the problem of how we can be moved by the contemplation of fi ctional events and the plight of fictional characters when we know that the former have not occurred and the latter do not exist. I will give a general sketch of the philosophical treatment of the issue in the present day, and then turn to the eighteenth century for a solution as effective as the best that are presently on offer. The (...)
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  10. David Hume and Jane Austen on Pride : Ethics in the Enlightenment.Eva M. Dadlez - 2008 - In Alexander John Dick & Christina Lupton (eds.), Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Pickering & Chatto.
  11. Quasi Fearing Fictions.Eva Dadlez - 2001 - Film and Philosophy 56:110.
     
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