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  1. Review of Jean Moritz Müller, The World-Directedness of Emotional Feeling. [REVIEW]Jonathan Mitchell - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
  2. Which Emotions Should Kantians Cultivate (and Which Ones Should They Discipline)?Uri Eran - 2020 - Kantian Review 25 (1):53-76.
    Commentators disagree about Kant’s view on the proper treatment of emotions. In contrast to a tendency in this literature to treat them uniformly, I argue that, according to Kant, feelings (but not affects) require cultivation, and inclinations – although they can and perhaps may be cultivated – generally require discipline. The appropriate treatment for emotions depends on their susceptibility to rational constraint and on the threat they pose to rational deliberation. Although I read Kant as recommending that we cultivate certain (...)
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  3. Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  4. Pre-Emotional Awareness and the Content-Priority View.Jonathan Mitchell - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (277):771-794.
    Much contemporary philosophy of emotion has been in broad agreement about the claim that emotional experiences have evaluative content. This paper assesses a relatively neglected alternative, which I call the content-priority view, according to which emotions are responses to a form of pre-emotional value awareness, as what we are aware of in having certain non-emotional evaluative states which are temporally prior to emotion. I argue that the central motivations of the view require a personal level conscious state of pre-emotional value (...)
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  5. Grief: A Philosophical Guide.Michael Cholbi - forthcoming - Princeton University Press.
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  6. Rationality Through the Eyes of Shame: Oppression and Liberation Via Emotion.Cecilea Mun - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (2):286-308.
    Standard accounts of shame characterize shame as an emotion of global negative self-assessment, in which an individual necessarily accepts or assents to a global negative self-evaluation. According to non-standard accounts of shame, experiences of shame need not involve a global negative self-assessment. I argue here in favor of non-standard accounts of shame over standard accounts. First, I begin with a detailed discussion of standard accounts of shame, focusing primarily on Gabriele Taylor’s (1985) standard account. Second, I illustrate how Adrian Piper’s (...)
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  7. Religious Experience Without Belief? Toward an Imaginative Account of Religious Engagement.Amber Griffioen - 2016 - In Thomas Hardtke, Ulrich Schmiedel & Tobias Tan (eds.), Religious Experience Revisited: Expressing the Inexpressible? Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 73-88.
    It is commonly supposed that a certain kind of belief is necessary for religious experience. Yet it is not clear that this must be so. In this article, I defend the possibility that a subject could have a genuine emotional religious experience without thereby necessarily believing that the purported object of her experience corresponds to reality and/or is the cause of her experience. Imaginative engagement, I argue, may evoke emotional religious experiences that may be said to be both genuine and (...)
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  8. On the Expression of Emotions in Rembrandt’s Art.Nafsika Litsardopoulou - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (3):665-688.
    Rembrandt has been characterized as "the master of the passions of the soul". His painting production has always elicited the viewers' strong emotional responses. Τhese responses raise the question regarding why Rembrandt's work has been singled out as the quintessential example of the expression of emotions both during the 17th century, as well as in recent times. I will try to approach the issue through two different yet interconnected routes. First, I will explore the tools and terms through which the (...)
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  9. Book Review: Spiritual Emotions: A Psychology of Christian VirtuesSpiritual Emotions: A Psychology of Christian VirtuesbyRobertsRobert C.Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 2007. 207 Pp. $18.00. ISBN 978-0-8038-2740-1. [REVIEW]Tammie M. Grimm - 2009 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 63 (3):324-324.
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  10. Nietzsche on Mirth and Morality.Trip Glazer - 2017 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 34 (1):79-97.
    Beginning in The Gay Science, Nietzsche repeatedly exhorts his readers to laugh. But why? I argue that Nietzsche wants us to laugh because the emotion that laughter expresses, mirth, plays an important psychological-cum-epistemological role in his attack on traditional morality. I contend that Nietzsche views mirth as an attitude that is uniquely suited to rooting out beliefs that have covertly infiltrated our psychologies. And given that Nietzsche considers morality to be insidious, or to maintain its hold over us even after (...)
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  11. Is Love and Emotion?Arina Pismenny & Jesse Prinz - 2017 - In Christopher Grau & Aaron Smuts (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Love. New York, NY, USA:
    What kind of mental phenomenon is romantic love? Many philosophers, psychologists, and ordinary folk treat it as an emotion. This chapter argues the category of emotion is inadequate to account for romantic love. It examines major emotion theories in philosophy and psychology and shows that they fail to illustrate that romantic love is an emotion. It considers the categories of basic emotions and emotion complexes, and demonstrates they too come short in accounting for romantic love. It assesses the roles of (...)
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  12. Shelly Kagan's The Limits of Morality. [REVIEW]Michael Slote - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):915.
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  13. Pain and Pleasure.Murat Aydede - forthcoming - In Andrea Scranantino (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Emotion Theory. Routledge.
    [Penultimate draft] This is a piece written for interdisciplinary audiences and contains very little philosophy. It looks into whether, or in what sense, pains and pleasures are emotions.
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  14. In Defense of Trait‐Based Love.Roger G. López - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy:169-194.
    It is widely believed that a person's traits can function as reasons for loving her. Notable contemporary work in the philosophy of love has taken the rejection of this premise as its point of departure. As far as I can tell, none of that work has engaged with a careful philosophical exposition of the view under discussion. In the following pages, I will defend the idea of trait-based love against three of its critics and one of its advocates. I will (...)
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  15. In Defense of Trait‐Based Love.Roger G. López - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy:169-194.
    It is widely believed that a person's traits can function as reasons for loving her. Notable contemporary work in the philosophy of love has taken the rejection of this premise as its point of departure. As far as I can tell, none of that work has engaged with a careful philosophical exposition of the view under discussion. In the following pages, I will defend the idea of trait-based love against three of its critics and one of its advocates. I will (...)
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  16. Moods Between Intelligibility and Articulability. Re-Examining Heidegger’s and Hegel’s Accounts of Affective States.Lucian Ionel - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1587-1598.
    Moods are usually taken to be pre-intentional affective states that tune our experience and cognition. Moreover, moods are sometimes considered to not only accompany cognitive acts, but to be understanding phenomena themselves. The following paper examines the assumption that moods represent a specific interpretative skill. Based upon that view, the semantic content of moods seems to be self-determining and to elude conceptual articulation. By contrast, I defend the thesis that the alleged inarticulable intelligibility of affective experiences is possible only due (...)
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  17. Sympathy for the Devil.Manfred Tietzel - 1980 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 11 (2):254-275.
    Summary In this article three dramas, quite subjectively picked out of the extensive literature, in which scientists play an important part and science constitutes a main subject, are analysed to find out, what are the underlying and implicit epistemological ideas.
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  18. On Romantic Love: Simple Truths About a Complex Emotion.Timothy Schroeder - 2016 - Philosophical Review Recent Issues 125 (2):287-289.
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  19. The Role of the Moral Emotions in Our Social and Political Practices.Anthony J. Steinbock - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (5):600-614.
    In this article, I address problems associated with ‘Modernity’ and those encountered at the impasse of post-modernity and the newly named phenomenon of ‘post-secularism’. I consider more specifically what I call ‘moral emotions’ or essentially interpersonal emotions can tell us about who we are as persons, and what they tell us about our experience and concepts of freedom, normativity, power, and critique. The moral emotions, and retrieving the evidence of the ‘heart’, point to the possibility of contributing to the social (...)
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  20. What is This Thing Called Love?William R. Jankowiak - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):109-110.
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  21. A Quest for the Meaning of Rising Love.Lubomir Lamy - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):113-114.
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  22. “Beyond Emotion: Love as an Encounter of Myth and Drive” by Lubomir Lamy.Donatella Marazziti - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):110-112.
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  23. Demystifying the Neuroscience of Love.Stephanie Cacioppo & John T. Cacioppo - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):108-109.
    Scholars from different disciplines have investigated the nature of love for centuries. It has been only in the past century that social psychologists have begun to scientifically investigate the complexity of love in comparison with other emotions (Hatfield & Rapson, 2009, for review). We laud Lamy (2016) for his thoughtful intentions to pursue this long-lasting tradition and extend his goal to better understand the definition and neural bases of love by focusing on recent scientific evidence from social psychology and neuroscience. (...)
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  24. Beyond Emotion: Love as an Encounter of Myth and Drive.Lubomir Lamy - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):97-107.
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  25. On Disgust.Christopher Knapp - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):523-526.
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  26. VI. Emotional Feelings and Intentionalism: Anthony Hatzimoysis.Anthony Hatzimoysis - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:105-111.
    Emotions are Janus-faced: their focus may switch from how a person is feeling deep inside her, to the busy world of actions, words, or gestures whose perception currently affects her. The intimate relation between the ‘inside’ and the ‘outside’ seems to call for a redrawing of the traditional distinction of mental states between those that can look out to the world, and those that are, supposedly, irredeemably blind.
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  27. XII. Narrative and Perspective; Values and Appropriate Emotions: Peter Goldie.Peter Goldie - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:201-220.
    To the realists.—You sober people who feel well armed against passion and fantasies and would like to turn your emptiness into a matter of pride and ornament: you call yourselves realists and hint that the world really is the way it appears to you. As if reality stood unveiled before you only, and you yourselves were perhaps the best part of it … But in your unveiled state are not even you still very passionate and dark creatures compared to fish, (...)
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  28. Philosophy and World Unity.Ernest R. Kilzer - 1950 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 24:1.
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  29. Contrary Feelings and the Cognitive Significance of Art.María José Alcaraz León - 2011 - Estetika 48 (1):62-80.
    Emotional response to artworks as a source of moral training or experimentation has long been disputed in the history of aesthetics. In this article I address the matter by focusing upon a kind of specimen that may by especially troublesome for an advocate of art’s capacity to educate our sentiments. The cases I focus upon – which I place under the label of the asymmetry problem – are those in which our emotional or evaluative response seems contrary to the one (...)
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  30. “The Power of Feeling”? Emotion, Sensibility, and the American Revolution.Sarah M. S. Pearsall - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):659-672.
    In January 1776, Thomas Paine demanded to know whether “the Power of feeling” did not require that American colonists declare independence from Great Britain. Paine's efforts included an appeal to “common sense,” to the idea that it was only natural for colonists to end their ties with Britain. For Paine, independence did not depend on elaborately wrought arguments; instead, it should be obvious to all, even the most unlettered. His own emotionally charged language—the king was akin to a “crowned ruffian” (...)
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  31. Review of “The Parameter of Aspect“ by Carlota S. Smith. [REVIEW]G. Hatav - 2000 - Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (2):451-453.
  32. Goodwin's Moods and Tenses. [REVIEW]D. B. Monro - 1890 - The Classical Review 4 (6):261-263.
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  33. Emotion, Feeling, and Behavior.Ramón M. Lemos - 1970 - Critica 4 (10):97-122.
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  34. Revenge.Robert J. Stainton - 2006 - Critica 38 (112):3-20.
    This paper discusses, in a preliminary manner, what revenge is. In particular, it proposes four elements of revenge --an agent, a recipient, a harm intended by the former, and a harm done by the latter which provokes the revenge. Based on these four elements, it highlights both agent-internal conditions for getting revenge, and agent-external ones. Along the way, the paper contrasts revenge with related phenomena like merely getting even, and retribution. /// Este trabajo discute de manera preliminar lo que es (...)
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  35. Music as a Test-Case.H. F. Cohen - 1985 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 16 (4):351.
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  36. Responsibility, Character, and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology. Ferdinand Schoeman.Laurence Thomas - 1989 - Ethics 99 (4):950-951.
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  37. The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks. Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature. [REVIEW]Edward Sanders - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (2):327-329.
  38. Feelings and Emotions: The Mooseheart Symposium. [REVIEW]Andre Godin - 1953 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 28 (1):154-155.
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  39. Blessed Rage for Order. [REVIEW]J. M. T. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (4):749-750.
    This book deserves the attention of philosophers of religion. Tracy presents a monumental synthesis of philosophy and history within the context of a "revisionist" theological model. Part I attempts adequately to articulate a method of inquiry by outlining the sets of evaluative criteria, the uses of evidence, and the place of the various philosophical and historical methods within this model. Not only must the method be responsive to the historical tradition, but it also must heed the non-Christian scrutiny of what (...)
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  40. Aristotle’s Defense of the Theoretical Life: Comments on Politics 7.David Roochnik - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 61 (4):711-735.
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  41. The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks: Studies in Aristotle and Greek Literature. [REVIEW]Sophie Rietti - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):447-452.
  42. Consciousness and Reality: Hegel’s Philosophy of Subjectivity. [REVIEW]Oliva Blanchette - 1978 - International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (2):235-238.
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  43. Two Experiences of Existence: Jean-Paul Sartre and Iris Murdoch.Diogenes Allen - 1974 - International Philosophical Quarterly 14 (2):181-187.
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  44. Studies in the Phenomenology of Sound: I. Listening.Don Ihde & Thomas F. Slaughter - 1970 - International Philosophical Quarterly 10 (2):232-239.
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  45. Thinking About Consciousness. [REVIEW]Godehard Brüntrup - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):452-453.
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  46. An Appraisal of Whiteheadian Nontheism.Lewis S. Ford - 1977 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):27-35.
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  47. “Psanterin” According to Daniel III. 5.Phillips Barry - 1910 - The Monist 20 (3):402-413.
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  48. The Mind-Body Problem: Phenomenological Reflections on an Ancient Solution.James R. Mensch - 1994 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (1):31-56.
  49. Valuing Emotions. [REVIEW]Ronald De Sousa - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (1):219-220.
    This book addresses both aspects of its punning title: it pleads with us to value emotions as indispensable to meaningful human life, and argues that emotions play an active role in the determination of value. The first issue is tackled with gusto. Indeed, as if to illustrate the role of the emotions in intellectual life, the tone is somewhat aggrieved, as if all but a few eccentrics in the philosophical establishment were expected to demur. Perhaps all books must pretend that (...)
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  50. Necessity, Volition, and Love. [REVIEW]Basil Smith - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (2):411-411.
    This is an insightful and clear group of essays which continues the work of an earlier collection called The Importance of What We Care About. In the earlier book, Frankfurt attempted to develop a theory of ideals independent of moral concerns. As he put it, “there is nothing distinctly moral about ideals such as being steadfastly loyal to a family tradition, or selflessly pursuing mathematical truth”. In Necessity, Volition, and Love, Frankfurt extends this theme. He says philosophers should pay attention (...)
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