20 found
Order:
  1. Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Look at the Arguments.J. M. Dieterle - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):127–139.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I examine the arguments against physician assisted suicide . Many of these arguments are consequentialist. Consequentialist arguments rely on empirical claims about the future and thus their strength depends on how likely it is that the predictions will be realized. I discuss these predictions against the backdrop of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and the practice of PAS in the Netherlands. I then turn to a specific consequentialist argument against PAS – Susan M. Wolf's feminist critique of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  96
    Social Construction in the Philosophy of Mathematics: A Critical Evaluation of Julian Cole’s Theory†: Articles.J. M. Dieterle - 2010 - Philosophia Mathematica 18 (3):311-328.
    Julian Cole argues that mathematical domains are the products of social construction. This view has an initial appeal in that it seems to salvage much that is good about traditional platonistic realism without taking on the ontological baggage. However, it also has problems. After a brief sketch of social constructivist theories and Cole’s philosophy of mathematics, I evaluate the arguments in favor of social constructivism. I also discuss two substantial problems with the theory. I argue that unless and until social (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  49
    Mathematical, Astrological, and Theological Naturalism.J. M. Dieterle - 1999 - Philosophia Mathematica 7 (2):129-135.
    persuasive argument for the claim that we ought to evaluate mathematics from a mathematical point of view and reject extra-mathematical standards. Maddy considers the objection that her arguments leave it open for an ‘astrological naturalist’ to make an analogous claim: that we ought to reject extra-astrological standards in the evaluation of astrology. In this paper, I attempt to show that Maddy's response to this objection is insufficient, for it ultimately either (1) undermines mathematical naturalism itself, leaving us with only scientific (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  4.  49
    Ockham's Razor, Encounterability, and Ontological Naturalism.J. M. Dieterle - 2001 - Erkenntnis 55 (1):51-72.
  5.  29
    Unnecessary Suffering.J. M. Dieterle - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (1):51-67.
    The philosophical literature on the ethical treatment of animals is largely divided between two distinct kinds of approaches: (1) the rights-based approach; and (2) the utilitarian approach. A third approach to the debate is possible. The general moral principle “It is wrong to cause unnecessary pain or suffering” is sufficient to render many human activities involving nonhuman animals morally wrong, provided an appropriate account of unnecessary is developed to give the principle its force. The moral principle can be easily applied (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  53
    Supervenience and Necessity: A Response to Balaguer.J. M. Dieterle - 2000 - Philosophia Mathematica 8 (3):302-309.
  7.  6
    Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Look at the Arguments.J. M. Dieterle - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):127-139.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I examine the arguments against physician assisted suicide. Many of these arguments are consequentialist. Consequentialist arguments rely on empirical claims about the future and thus their strength depends on how likely it is that the predictions will be realized. I discuss these predictions against the backdrop of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and the practice of PAS in the Netherlands. I then turn to a specific consequentialist argument against PAS – Susan M. Wolf's feminist critique of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  18
    Cooptation or Solidarity: Food Sovereignty in the Developed World.Mark Christopher Navin & J. M. Dieterle - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (2):319-329.
    This paper builds on previous research about the potential downsides of food sovereignty activism in relatively wealthy societies by developing a three-part taxonomy of harms that may arise in such contexts. These are direct opposition, false equivalence, and diluted goals and methods. While this paper provides reasons to resist complacency about wealthy-world food sovereignty, we are optimistic about the potential for food sovereignty in wealthy societies, and we conclude by describing how wealthy-world food sovereignty can be a location of either (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  41
    The Fetal Position.J. M. Dieterle - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):423-425.
  10.  25
    Autonomy, Values, and Food Choice.J. M. Dieterle - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (3):349-367.
    In most areas of our lives, legal protections are in place to ensure that we have autonomous control over what happens in and to our bodies. However, there are fewer protections in place for autonomous choice when it comes to the food we purchase and consume. In fact, the current trend in US legislation is pushing us away from autonomous food choice. In this paper, I discuss two examples of this trend: corporate resistance to GM labeling laws and farm protection (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  60
    Critical Studies/Book Reviews.J. M. Dieterle - 2000 - Philosophia Mathematica 8 (3):347-348.
  12.  45
    Freedom of Conscience, Employee Prerogatives, and Consumer Choice: Veal, Birth Control, and Tanning Beds. [REVIEW]J. M. Dieterle - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):191 - 203.
    Does a pharmacist have a right to refuse to fill certain prescriptions? In this paper, I examine cases in which an employee might refuse to do something that is part of his or her job description. I will argue that in some of these cases, an employee does have a right of refusal and in other cases an employee does not. In those cases where the employee does not have a right of refusal, I argue that the refusals (if repeated) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  32
    Animal Ethics in Context.J. M. Dieterle - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (2):223-224.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  27
    Wild Justice.J. M. Dieterle - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (1):95-98.
  15.  14
    Reviews-Platonism and Anti-Platonism in Mathematics.Mark Balaguer & J. M. Dieterle - 1999 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (4):775-780.
  16.  8
    Freedom of Conscience, Employee Prerogatives, and Consumer Choice: Veal, Birth Control, and Tanning Beds.J. M. Dieterle - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):191-203.
    Does a pharmacist have a right to refuse to fill certain prescriptions? In this paper, I examine cases in which an employee might refuse to do something that is part of his or her job description. I will argue that in some of these cases, an employee does have a right of refusal and in other cases an employee does not. In those cases where the employee does not have a right of refusal, I argue that the refusals are just (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  9
    Affirmative Action and Desert.J. M. Dieterle - 2005 - Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (2):81-94.
  18.  3
    Wild Justice: The Moral Lives of Animals. [REVIEW]J. M. Dieterle - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (1):95-98.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  2
    The Fetal Position: A Rational Approach to the Abortion Issue. [REVIEW]J. M. Dieterle - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):423-425.
  20. Shifting the Focus: Food Choice, Paternalism, and State Regulation.J. M. Dieterle - 2019 - Food Ethics 5 (1-2).
    In this paper, I examine the question of whether there is justification for regulations that place limits on food choices. I begin by discussing Sarah Conly’s recent defense of paternalist limits on food choice. I argue that Conly’s argument is flawed because it assumes a particular conception of health that is not universally shared. I examine this conception of health in some detail, and I argue that we need to shift our focus from individual behaviors and lifestyle to the broader (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark