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Michael Futch [17]Michael J. Futch [6]Michael Joseph Futch [1]
  1. Leibniz and the Natural World: Activity, Passivity, and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz's Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW]Michael Futch - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):162-163.
  2.  46
    Leibniz on Time and Substance.Michael Futch - 2006 - Idealistic Studies 36 (2):109-122.
    Leibniz’s metaphysics is centered on the claim that ultimate reality is composed of mind-like, immaterial substances, monads. While it is universally agreed that such substances are non-spatial, monads’ relation to time is less clear. In some passages, Leibniz suggests that monads are themselves temporal, yet in others he implies that they have only derived temporal properties in virtue of being connected to phenomenal bodies. This has led to predictable disagreements among commentators, some insisting that monads are intrinsically temporal and some (...)
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  3.  32
    Supervenience and Reductionism in Leibniz’s Philosophy of Time.Michael J. Futch - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (4):793-810.
    It has recently been suggested that, for Leibniz, temporal facts globally supervene on causal facts, with the result that worlds differing with respect to their causal facts can be indiscernible with respect to their temporal facts. Such an interpretation is at variance with more traditional readings of Leibniz’s causal theory of time, which hold that Leibniz reduces temporal facts to causal facts. In this article, I argue against the global supervenience construal of Leibniz’s philosophy of time. On the view of (...)
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  4. Substance and Intelligibility in Leibniz's Metaphysics. [REVIEW]Michael Futch - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):257-258.
  5.  44
    Leibniz on the Logical Order of Time.Michael J. Futch - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (1):91-106.
    As regards the question of the nature of time, Leibniz's account of monads raises the question of whether they have a temporal order and what this temporal order derives from. His account is generally taken to be an attempt to ground the asymmetric direction of time in a non-temporal sequence, such a chain of causes or reasons. The problem is whether such chains can ground temporal sequences without presupposing what it is that they are supposed to ground. Is his attempt (...)
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  6.  41
    La métaphysique du temps chez Leibniz et Kant.Michael Futch - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:171-174.
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  7.  74
    Leibniz's Non-Tensed Theory of Time.Michael J. Futch - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (2):125 – 139.
    Leibniz's philosophy of time, often seen as a precursor to current forms of relationalism and causal theories of time, has rightly earned the admiration of his more recent counterparts in the philosophy of science. In this article, I examine Leibniz's philosophy of time from a new perspective: the role that tense and non-tensed temporal properties/relations play in it. Specifically, I argue that Leibniz's philosophy of time is best (and non-anachronistically) construed as a non-tensed theory of time, one that dispenses with (...)
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  8.  65
    Leibnizian Causation.Michael J. Futch - 2005 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (3):451-467.
    This article examines Leibniz's philosophy of causation with the aim of clarifying how causes are related to their effects. I argue that, much like J. L. Mackie's INUS conditions, Leibnizian causes are members of complex causal conditions. More precisely, Leibniz identifies causes with elements of complex causal conditions, where the complex condition as a whole is sufficient for the effect, and the cause is a necessary part of that condition. This conception of causation is able to incorporate Leibniz's many other (...)
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  9.  14
    Norris and the Soul’s Immortality.Michael Futch - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (1):43-60.
    John Norris’s novel and compelling theory on the soul’s immortality is both a central element of his overall philosophical vision and a vital engagement with his contemporaries on the topic. Even so, it has been mostly neglected in the secondary literature. This article aims to fill this lacuna by providing a detailed analysis of how Norris arrives at two seemingly inconsistent theses: the soul is naturally immortal in the sense of being incorruptible but naturally mortal in the sense of being (...)
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  10.  50
    Spinoza's Ethics: An Introduction - by Steven Nadler.Michael Futch - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (4):373-375.
  11.  30
    Augustine on the Successiveness of Time.Michael Futch - 2002 - Augustinian Studies 33 (1):17-38.
  12.  20
    Leibniz on Plenitude, Infinity, and the Eternity of the World.Michael Futch - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (4):541-560.
  13.  9
    Time Unbounded: Leibniz on Infinite Temporal Regresses.Michael J. Futch - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):321-334.
    Leibniz’s philosophy of time stands at the center not only of his metaphysics but also of his overall philosophy. For this reason, it has attracted the interest of Leibniz scholars and of philosophers of science alike. This concern notwithstanding, scant attention has been paid to what Leibniz himself takes to be a principal philosophical and theological issue in his philosophy of time: the world’s eternity. This article aims to redress this imbalance by ascertaining Leibniz’s views on the beginning, or beginninglessness, (...)
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  14.  21
    Substance & Individuation in Leibniz (Review).Michael Futch & Donald Rutherford - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (4):591-592.
  15.  17
    Time Unbounded.Michael J. Futch - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):321-334.
    Leibniz’s philosophy of time stands at the center not only of his metaphysics but also of his overall philosophy. For this reason, it has attracted the interest of Leibniz scholars and of philosophers of science alike. This concern notwithstanding, scant attention has been paid to what Leibniz himself takes to be a principal philosophical and theological issue in his philosophy of time: the world’s eternity. This article aims to redress this imbalance by ascertaining Leibniz’s views on the beginning, or beginninglessness, (...)
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  16.  10
    Leibniz and the Foundations of Natural Philosophy: Daniel Garber: Leibniz: Body, Substance, Monad. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2009, Xxi + 428 Pp, US$ 55.00 HB.Michael Futch - 2010 - Metascience 19 (3):391-394.
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  17.  13
    Life and Organism in Leibniz’s Philosophy: Justin E. H. Smith and Ohad Nachtomy : Machines of Nature and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz. Dordrecht: Springer, 2011, Ix+206pp, $139 HB.Michael Futch - 2013 - Metascience 22 (2):335-338.
  18.  6
    Philip Ball. Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. Pp. Viii+465. $35.00. [REVIEW]Michael Futch - 2014 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (1):186-189.
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  19.  2
    Norris and the Soul’s Immortality in Advance.Michael Futch - forthcoming - International Philosophical Quarterly.
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  20.  2
    La Métaphysique du Temps Chez Leibniz Et Kant. [REVIEW]Michael Futch - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:171-174.
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  21.  2
    La métaphysique du temps chez Leibniz et Kant.Michael Futch - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:171-174.
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  22. 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii).Randall E. Auxier, Shane J. Ralston, Randy L. Friedman, Michael Futch, Tadd Ruetenik, István Aranyosi & Marilyn Fischer - 2012 - The Pluralist 7 (1).
     
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  23. Leibnizian Relationalism and Temporal Essentialism.Michael Futch - 2012 - Studia Leibnitiana 44 (1):60-80.
     
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