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Robyn Fivush [14]R. Fivush [1]
  1.  36
    The Emergence of Autobiographical Memory: A Social Cultural Developmental Theory.Katherine Nelson & Robyn Fivush - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (2):486-511.
  2. Socialization of memory.Katherine Nelson & Robyn Fivush - 2000 - In Endel Tulving (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press. pp. 283--295.
     
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  3.  21
    Mother-child talk about past emotions: Relations of maternal language and child gender over time.Janet Kuebli, Susan Butler & Robyn Fivush - 1995 - Cognition and Emotion 9 (2-3):265-283.
  4.  11
    Functions of Parental Intergenerational Narratives Told by Young People.Natalie Merrill, Jordan A. Booker & Robyn Fivush - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (4):752-773.
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  5.  9
    The social construction of autobiographical memory.Robyn Fivush & Elaine Reese - 1992 - In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 115--132.
  6.  13
    Children's narratives and well-being.Robyn Fivush, Kelly Marin, Megan Crawford, Martina Reynolds & Chris R. Brewin - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (7):1414-1434.
  7.  5
    The sociocultural functions of episodic memory.Robyn Fivush - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
    The functional use of episodic memories to claim epistemic truth must be placed within sociocultural contexts in which certain truths are privileged. Episodic memories are shared, evaluated, and understood within sociocultural interactions, creating both individual and group identities. These negotiated identities provide the foundation from which epistemic claims to truth can be made.
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  8.  1
    Narrative coherence predicts emotional well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic: a two-year longitudinal study.Lauranne Vanaken, Patricia Bijttebier, Robyn Fivush & Dirk Hermans - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (1):70-81.
    Prior research has shown that narrative coherence is associated with more positive emotional responses in the face of traumatic or stressful experiences. However, most of these studies only examined narrative coherence after the stressor had already occurred. Given the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease COVID-19 in March 2020 in Belgium and the presence of data obtained two years before (February 2018), we could use our baseline narrative coherence data to predict emotional well-being and perceived social support in the midst (...)
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  9. Mother-Child Talk about Past Emotions: Relations of Maternal Language and Child Gender Over Time Janet Kuebli Saint Louis University, St. Louis, USA.Susan Butler & Robyn Fivush - 1995 - Cognition and Emotion 9 (1-3):265-283.
  10. Emotion and Gender in Personal Narratives.Robyn Fivush & Azriel Grysman - 2020 - In Sonya E. Pritzker, Janina Fenigsen & James MacLynn Wilce (eds.), The Routledge handbook of language and emotion. Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.
  11. Silencing self and other through autobiographical narratives.Robyn Fivush & Monisha Pasupathi - 2019 - In Amy Jo Murray & Kevin Durrheim (eds.), Qualitative studies of silence: the unsaid as social action. Cambridge University Press.
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  12.  1
    “A life without stories is no life at all”: How Stories Create Selves.Robyn Fivush - 2019 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 3 (1):41-44.
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  13. Autobiographical knowledge and autobiographical memories.R. Fivush, C. Haden & E. Reese - 1996 - In David C. Rubin (ed.), Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory. Cambridge University Press. pp. 341--359.
  14.  9
    Young Children′s Event Recall: Are Memories Constructed through Discourse?Robyn Fivush - 1994 - Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):356-373.
    The ways in which event memories may be reconstructed or transformed through discussion with others is a critical question both for understanding basic memory processes and for issues concerning legal testimony. In this research, white middle-class preschool children were interviewed first by their mothers and then by a female experimenter about personally experienced events when they were 40, 46, 58, and 70 months of age. Analyses indicated that at all four time points children only incorporated about 9% of the information (...)
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  15.  7
    Language, Narrative, and Autobiography.Robyn Fivush - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):100-103.