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  1. Pnina G. Abir-Am & Clark A. Elliot (2002). Edited Volumes-Commemorative Practices in Science: Historical Perspectives on the Politics of Collective Memory. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):348.
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  2. Pnina G. Abir-Am & Clark A. Elliot (eds.) (2000). Osiris, Volume 14: Commemorative Practices in Science: Historical Perspectives on the Politics of Collective Memory. University of Chicago Press Journals.
    This volume breaks new ground in the study of how national culture, disciplinary tradition, epistemological choice, and political expediency affect the construction of collective memory and, then, how historians work with—and sometimes against—those constructions. Essays focus on a variety of commemorative rites, ranging from the quincentennial of Copernicus to the centennials of Pasteur, Darwin, and Planck; from the tercentenary of Harvard to the half centennial of Los Alamos; from the centennial of evolutionary theory to anniversaries of research schools in molecular (...)
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  3. Jane Addams (ed.) (1916). The Long Road of Woman's Memory. Macmillan.
    The tales they shared with Addams in the wake of the Devil Baby were more personal and revealing than any they had previously told her: stories of abusive mates ...
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  4. Sally Alexander (2010). Memory-Talk: London Childhoods. In Susannah Radstone & Bill Schwarz (eds.), Memory: Histories, Theories, Debates. Fordham University Press. pp. 236.
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  5. Mengistu Amberber (ed.) (2007). The Language of Memory in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective. John Benjamins.
    ... volume explores the language of memory in a cross-linguistic perspective. The term memory is to be understood broadly as the "capacity to encode, store, ...
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  6. J. Andermann & S. Arnold-de Simine (2012). Introduction: Memory, Community and the New Museum. Theory, Culture and Society 29 (1):3-13.
    Over the last decades, in response to feminist, postmodern and postcolonial critiques of the modern museum, objects, collections and processes of museaIization have been radically re-signified and re-posited in the cultural arena. The new museums emerging from this shift have redefined their functions in and for communities not simply by changing their narratives but by renegotiating the processes of narration and the museal codes of communication with the public. They define themselves now not as disciplinary spaces of academic history but (...)
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  7. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2005). Memory, Identity, and Cultural Authority. Social Philosophy Today 21:249-252.
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  8. Erika Apfelbaum (2010). Halbwachs and the Social Properties of Memory. In Susannah Radstone & Bill Schwarz (eds.), Memory: Histories, Theories, Debates. Fordham University Press. pp. 77--92.
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  9. Vera Apfelthaler & Julia B. Köhne (2007). Introduction : Memory, Media, Gender, and Transgressions in/Via Film and Theater. In Vera Apfelthaler & Julia Köhne (eds.), Gendered Memories: Transgressions in German and Israeli Film and Theatre. Turia + Kant.
  10. Maurice Apprey (2001). Fieldnotes on Staging and Transforming Historical Grievances: From Cultural Memory to a Reconstructable Future. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 32 (1):71-83.
    A journey from cultural memory through recall to transformation of historical grievances is elucidated with the aid of phenomenological thought. The context for this study is a conflict resolution project undertaken by the Center for the Study of Mind and Human Interaction of the University of Virginia. Russians and Estonians of Klooga participated in a group meeting aimed at resolving ethnonational conflict. This meeting is described, and the potential of phenomenology in an interdisciplinary approach to conflict resolution is explored.
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  11. Robert Archibald (2004). The New Town Square Museums and Communities in Transition.
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  12. Aleida Assmann (2008). Transformations Between History and Memory. Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (1):49-72.
    "Collective memory" is an umbrella term for different formats of memory. Interactive and social memory are both formats that are embodied, grounded in lived experience that vanish with their carriers. The manifestations of political and cultural memory, on the other hand, are grounded on the more durable carriers of external symbols and representations and can be re-embodied and transmitted from one generation to another. The relation between "history" and "memory" has itself a history that has evolved over time, passing through (...)
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  13. Aleida Assmann (2001). History and Memory. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. pp. 10--6822.
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  14. Robyn Autry (2013). The Political Economy of Memory: The Challenges of Representing National Conflict at 'Identity-Driven' Museums. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 42 (1):57-80.
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  15. Maurice Aymard (2004). History and Memory: Construction, Deconstruction and Reconstruction. Diogenes 51 (1):7-16.
    Memory is currently an important concern for our societies, as well as for the social and human sciences. This article discusses aspects of memory and history. Never have memory’s tools been more powerful or more efficient, yet never has the relationship between history and memory seemed more uncertain. History has lost its monopoly over the production and conservation of memory; memory has developed independently and is inspiring new partners, for example in science and literature.
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  16. Siyaves Azeri (2013). Hume's Social Theory of Memory. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):53-68.
    Traditionally, Hume's account of memory is considered an individualist-atomic representational theory. However, textual evidence suggests that Hume's account is better seen as a first attempt to create a social theory of memory that considers social context, custom and habits, language, and logical structures as constitutive elements of memory.
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  17. Egbert Bakker (2009). Speech in Homer. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):12-.
  18. Jeffrey Barash (2011). At the Threshold of Memory: Collective Memory Between Personal Experience and Political Identity. Meta 3 (2):249-267.
    Collective memory is thought to be something “more” than a conglomeration of personal memories which compose it. Yet, each of us, each individual in every society, remembers from a personal point of view. And if there is memory beyond personal experience through which collective identities are configured, in what “place” might one legitimately situate it? In addressing this question, this article examines the political significance of the distinction between two levels of what are often lumped together under the term of (...)
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  19. Jeffrey Andrew Barash (2010). The Place of Remembrance: Reflections on Paul Ricoeur's Theory of Collective Memory. In Brian Treanor & Henry Isaac Venema (eds.), A Passion for the Possible: Thinking with Paul Ricoeur. Fordham University Press.
  20. Amanda Barnier, John Sutton, Celia Harris & Robert A. Wilson (2008). A Conceptual and Empirical Framework for the Social Distribution of Cognition: The Case of Memory. Cognitive Systems Research 9 (1):33-51.
    In this paper, we aim to show that the framework of embedded, distributed, or extended cognition offers new perspectives on social cognition by applying it to one specific domain: the psychology of memory. In making our case, first we specify some key social dimensions of cognitive distribution and some basic distinctions between memory cases, and then describe stronger and weaker versions of distributed remembering in the general distributed cognition framework. Next, we examine studies of social influences on memory in cognitive (...)
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  21. Kathy Behrendt (2013). Hirsch, Sebald, and the Uses and Limits of Postmemory. In Russell J. A. Kilbourn & Eleanor Ty (eds.), The Memory Effect: The Remediation of Memory in Literature and Film. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. pp. 51-67.
    Marianne Hirsch’s influential concept of postmemory articulates the ethical significance of representing trauma in art and literature. Postmemory, for Hirsch, “describes the relationship of children of survivors of cultural or collective trauma to the experiences of their parents, experiences that they ‘remember’ only as the narratives and images with which they grew up, but that are so powerful, so monumental, as to constitute memories in their own right”. Through appeal to recent philosophical work on memory, the ethics of remembering, and (...)
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  22. Kathy Behrendt (2010). Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, Sebald (...)
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  23. Duncan Bell (2008). Agonistic Democracy and the Politics of Memory. Constellations 15 (1):148-166.
  24. Jill Bennett (2005). The Aesthetics of Sense-Memory: Theorising Trauma Through the Visual Arts. In Susannah Radstone & Katharine Hodgkin (eds.), Memory Cultures: Memory, Subjectivity, And Recognition. Transaction Publishers.
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  25. Tony Bennett (2005). Stored Virtue: Memory, the Body and the Evolutionary Museum. In Susannah Radstone & Katharine Hodgkin (eds.), Memory Cultures: Memory, Subjectivity, And Recognition.
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  26. Silvia Benso (2003). A Politics of Witnessing: History, Memory, and the Third—Beyond Levinas. Studies in Practical Philosophy 3 (2):4-18.
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  27. Olga N. Nikitina-den Besten, Elena Rozhdestvenskaya & Victoria Semenova, Women's Biographies and Women's Memory of War.
    This article is the English-language pre-print version of the chapter published in "Hitlers Sklaven" (in German). The volume "Hitlers Sklaven" (2008) is a result of a massive international oral history project aimed to study forced and slave labour for the Nazi regime during World War II. Within this volume, our article focuses specifically on the experiences of Russian women - former slave labourers. Biographical interviews with these now elderly women were carried out in 2005 in Pskov. The Russian region of (...)
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  28. Lavinia Betea (2016). Christian Mercy and Pro-Social Behaviors in the Memory of the Deportation of German Ethnics From Romania to the Soviet Union. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 15 (45):310-337.
    If the classic history of events is written in the spirit of winners, the approaches of collective mental reveal that wars are disasters and collective traumas for all of the involved communities. In the following pages we will present the decantation in long term memory of a relevant fact – the deportation of German ethnics from Romania to forced labor in the Soviet Union. On the base of a secret directive, sent by Stalin, approximately 75 000 Romanian citizens of German (...)
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  29. Carole Blair, Greg Dickinson & Brian L. Ott (2010). Introduction : Rhetoric/Memory/Place. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  30. Carole Blair, Greg Dickinson & Brian L. Ott (2010). Rhetoric/Memory/Place. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press. pp. 1--54.
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  31. Jonathan M. Bloom, Irene A. Bierman & Anna Contadini (2000). Writing Signs: The Fatimid Public TextFatimid Art at the Victoria and Albert Museums. Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (2):271.
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  32. Jeffrey Blustein (2010). Forgiveness, Commemoration, and Restorative Justice: The Role of Moral Emotions. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):582-617.
    Abstract: Forgiveness of wrongdoing in response to public apology and amends making seems, on the face of it, to leave little room for the continued commemoration of wrongdoing. This rests on a misunderstanding of forgiveness, however, and we can explain why there need be no incompatibility between them. To do this, I emphasize the role of what I call nonangry negative moral emotions in constituting memories of wrongdoing. Memories so constituted can persist after forgiveness and have important moral functions, and (...)
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  33. Jeffrey Blustein (2008). The Moral Demands of Memory. Cambridge University Press.
    Despite an explosion of studies on memory in historical and cultural studies, there is relatively little in moral philosophy on this subject. In this book, Jeffrey Blustein provides a systematic and philosophically rigorous account of a morality of memory. Drawing on a broad range of philosophical and humanistic literatures, he offers a novel examination of memory and our relations to people and events from our past, the ways in which memory is preserved and transmitted, and the moral responsibilities associated with (...)
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  34. R. Bodei (1992). Farewell to the Past: Historical Memory, Oblivion and Collective Identity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):251-265.
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  35. John Bodnar (2010). Memory. Bad Dreams About the Good War : Bataan. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  36. James A. Borland, Memorials 2002.
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  37. James A. Borland, Memorials 1996.
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  38. Marie-noëlle Bourguet, Lucette Valensi & Nathan Wachtel (1990). Between Memory and History.
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  39. Bob Brecher (2006). Reparation, Responsibility and the Memory Game. Res Publica 12 (2):213-221.
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  40. D. Bromwich (1990). Whitman and Memory: A Response to Kateb. Political Theory 18 (4):572-576.
  41. Melissa J. Bushnick, Between Memory and History: Shimon Attie's Art of Remembrance.
    Following the fall of the Berlin Wall, American-Jewish artist Shimon Attie traveled to the former Jewish quarter of Berlin and wondered “Where are all the missing people?” With this question in mind, Attie embarked on a two year project that involved converting black and white archival photographs of pre-war Jewish life in Berlin into slides and projecting them onto the sites they were originally taken. During the course of the one or two day installation, Attie would photograph the projection. These (...)
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  42. Jeffrey Cain (2009). After Utopia: Three Post-Personal Subjects Consider the Possibilities William E. Connolly (2008) Capitalism and Christianity, American Style, Durham and London: Duke University Press.Alexander García Düttmann (2007) Philosophy of Exaggeration, Trans. James Phillips, London: Continuum.Adrian Parr (2008) Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. [REVIEW] Deleuze Studies 3 (2):138-143.
    William E. Connolly Capitalism and Christianity, American Style, Durham and London: Duke University Press.Alexander García Düttmann Philosophy of Exaggeration, trans. James Phillips, London: Continuum.Adrian Parr Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
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  43. Sue Campbell (2009). Inside the Frame of the Past : Memory, Diversity, and Solidarity. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 211--33.
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  44. Sue Campbell (1997). Women, "False" Memory, and Personal Identity. Hypatia 12 (2):51 - 82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  45. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2009). Cultural Memory, Empathy, and Rape. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):25-42.
    Assuming a relational understanding of the self, I argue that empathy is necessary for individual and cultural recovery from rape. However, gender affects our ability to listen with empathy to rape survivors. For women, the existence of cultural memories discourages empathy either by engendering fear of their own future rape or by provoking sympathy rather than empathy. For men, the lack of cultural memories makes rape what Arendt calls an "unreality," thus diminishing the possibility for empathy. Although empathetic listeningpresents gender (...)
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  46. David Carrier (2003). Remembering the Past: Art Museums as Memory Theatres. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (1):61–65.
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  47. Peter Carrier, Monuments and National Memory Cultures in France and Germany.
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  48. Edward S. Casey (1987). Remembering: A Phenomenological Study. Indiana University Press.
    Edward S. Casey provides a thorough description of the varieties of human memory, including recognizing and reminding, reminiscing and commemorating, body memory and place memory. The preface to the new edition extends the scope of the original text to include issues of collective memory, forgetting, and traumatic memory, and aligns this book with Casey's newest work on place and space. This ambitious study demonstrates that nothing in our lives is unaffected by remembering.
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  49. Paolo Cherchi Usai (2001). The Death of Cinema: History, Cultural Memory, and the Digital Dark Age. Bfi.
    It is estimated that about one and a half billion hours of moving images were produced in 1999, twice as many as a decade before. If that rate of growth continues, one hundred billion hours of moving images will be made in the year 2025. In 1895 there were just above forty minutes of moving images to be seen, and most of them are now preserved. Today, for every film made, thousands of them disappear forever without leaving a trace. Meanwhile, (...)
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  50. Paul Connerton (1989). How Societies Remember. Cambridge University Press.
    Most studies of memory as a cultural faculty focus on written practices and how they are transmitted. This study concentrates on incorporated practices and provides an account of how these things are transmitted in and as traditions. The author argues that images and recollected knowledge of the past are conveyed and sustained by ritual performances, and that performative memory is bodily. This is an essential aspect of social memory that until now has been badly neglected.
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