This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

56 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 56
  1. Character: The Framework for a Successful Life.E. M. Adams - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):1-18.
  2. The Personal Lives of Strong Evaluators: Identity, Pluralism, and Ontology in Charles Taylor's Value Theory.Joel Anderson - 1996 - Constellations 3 (1):17-38.
  3. Principles and Persons.R. J. B. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):343-343.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Naturalism and the First-Person Perspective.Lynne Rudder Baker - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Science and its philosophical companion, Naturalism, represent reality in wholly nonpersonal terms. How, if at all, can a nonpersonal scheme accommodate the first-person perspective that we all enjoy? In this volume, Lynne Rudder Baker explores that question by considering both reductive and eliminative approaches to the first-person perspective. After finding both approaches wanting, she mounts an original constructive argument to show that a non-Cartesian first-person perspective belongs in the basic inventory of what exists. That is, the world that contains us (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Personal Narratives, Social Justice, and the Law.Samia Bano & Jennifer L. Pierce - 2013 - Feminist Legal Studies 21 (3):225-239.
    North American writer Joan Didion’s eloquent testimonial speaks to the significance of storytelling in our lives. Personal storiesmake our lives meaningful. Part of this is because our stories, wittingly or not, become the means through which we fashion our identities for listeners. Or, as scholars from many disciplines have argued, identity and selfhoodare narrative accomplishments. In this formulation, an individual constructs a sense of self by telling stories or “personal narratives,” which describe “the evolution of an individual life over time (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. The Extreme Claim, Psychological Continuity and the Person Life View.Simon Beck - 2015 - South African Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):314-322.
    Marya Schechtman has raised a series of worries for the Psychological Continuity Theory of personal identity (PCT) stemming out of what Derek Parfit called the ‘Extreme Claim’. This is roughly the claim that theories like it are unable to explain the importance we attach to personal identity. In her recent Staying Alive (2014), she presents further arguments related to this and sets out a new narrative theory, the Person Life View (PLV), which she sees as solving the problems as well (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Am I My Brother's Keeper? On Personal Identity and Responsibility.Simon Beck - 2013 - South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):1-9.
    The psychological continuity theory of personal identity has recently been accused of not meeting what is claimed to be a fundamental requirement on theories of identity - to explain personal moral responsibility. Although they often have much to say about responsibility, the charge is that they cannot say enough. I set out the background to the charge with a short discussion of Locke and the requirement to explain responsibility, then illustrate the accusation facing the theory with details from Marya Schechtman. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. Martha Nussbaum and the Foundations of Ethics: Identity, Morality and Thought-Experiments.Simon Beck - 2009 - South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):261-270.
    Martha Nussbaum has argued in support of the view (supposedly that of Aristotle) that we can, through thought-experiments involving personal identity, find an objective foundation for moral thought without having to appeal to any authority independent of morality. I compare the thought-experiment from Plato’s Philebus that she presents as an example to other thought-experiments involving identity in the literature and argue that this reveals a tension between the sources of authority which Nussbaum invokes for her thought-experiment. I also argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Parfit and the Russians.Simon Beck - 1989 - Analysis 49 (4):205.
    The paper takes a close look at Derek Parfit’s example of the Nineteenth Century Russian in 'Reasons and Persons'. Parfit presents it as an example which illustrates the moral consequences of adopting his reductionist view of personal identity in a positive light. I argue that things turn out to be more complex than he envisages, and that it might be far more difficult to live in his world than he allows.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10. Narrative Aversion: Challenges for the Illness Narrative Advocate.Kathy Behrendt - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (1):50-69.
    Engaging in self-narrative is often touted as a powerful antidote to the bad effects of illness. However, there are various examples of what may broadly be termed “aversion” to illness narrative. I group these into three kinds: aversion to certain types of illness narrative; aversion to illness narrative as a whole; and aversion to illness narrative as an essentially therapeutic endeavor. These aversions can throw into doubt the advantages claimed for the illness narrator, including the key benefits of repair to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. Whole Lives and Good Deaths.Kathy Behrendt - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (3):331-347.
    This article discusses two views associated with narrative conceptions of the self. The first view asserts that our whole life is reasonably regarded as a single unit of meaning. A prominent strand of the philosophical narrative account of the self is the representative of this view. The second view—which has currency beyond the confines of the philosophical narrative account—is that the meaning of a life story is dependent on what happens at the end of it. The article argues that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Illness as Narrative. [REVIEW]Kathy Behrendt - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (1):65-66.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Reasons to Be Fearful: Strawson, Death and Narrative.Kathy Behrendt - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 60:133-.
    I compare and assess two significant and opposing approaches to the self with respect to what they have to say about death: the anti-narrativist, as articulated by Galen Strawson, and the narrativist, as pieced together from a variety of accounts. Neither party fares particularly well on the matter of death. Both are unable to point towards a view of death that is clearly consistent with their views on the self. In the narrativist’s case this inconsistency is perhaps not as explicit (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14. The Person God Is.Peter A. Bertocci - 1968 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 2:185-206.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. The Moral Structure of the Person.Peter A. Bertocci - 1960 - Review of Metaphysics 14 (3):369 - 388.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Prospects for Temporal Neutrality.David O. Brink - 2011 - In Craig Callender (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press.
  17. Prudence and Authenticity: Intrapersonal Conflicts of Value.David O. Brink - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):215-245.
    Prudence and authenticity are sometimes seen as rival virtues. Prudence,as traditionally conceived, is temporally neutral. It attaches no intrinsic significance to the temporal location of benefits or harms within the agent’s life; the prudent agent should be equally concerned about all parts of her life. But people’s values and ideals often change over time, sometimes in predictable ways, as when middle age and parenthood often temporize youthful radicalism or spontaneity with concerns for comfort,security, and predictability. In situations involving diachronic, intrapersonal (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  18. Time, Science and the Critique of Technological Reason: Essays in Honour of Hermínio Martins.José Esteban Castro, Bridget Fowler & Luís Gomes (eds.) - 2018 - London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
    This festschrift commemorates the legacy of UK-based Portuguese sociologist Hermínio Martins (1934-2015). It introduces Martins’ wide-ranging contributions to the social sciences, encompassing seminal works in the fields of philosophy and social theory, historical and political sociology, studies of science and technology, and Luso-Brazilian studies, among others.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Dead People.Peter Cave - 2003 - Think 2 (5):83.
    Peter Cave explains why he believes we can and should treat people well, even after they have ceased to exist. We should treat people well; therefore, we should treat dead people well.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Omniversal Liberty.Thomas Crowther - 2014 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 22 (2):119-136.
    ‘Liberty’, as a word, is thrown about contemporary society as casually as a ball is on a summer’s day, and yet, does anyone have a grasp on what it is? If it is freedom from limitation, then liberty must represent nothing less than consciousness without restraint. But though this straightforward definition implies its acquisition to be equally straightforward, the full spectrum of liberty would certainly prove to be one of the most elusive concepts imaginable. As a result, what we have, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Identity, Agency & Tragedy.A. E. Denham & Franklin Worrell - 2013 - In Zina Giannopoulos (ed.), The Philosophy of Film: David Lynch. Routledge.
  22. Personal Identity, Concerns, and Indeterminacy.Matti Eklund - 2004 - The Monist 87 (4):489-511.
    Let the moral question of personal identity be the following: what is the nature of the entities we should focus our prudential concerns and ascriptions of responsibility around? (If indeed we should structure these things around any entities at all.) Let the semantic question of personal identity be the question of what is the nature of the entities that ‘person’ is true of. A naive (in the sense of simple and intuitive) view would have it that the two questions are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  23. Persons and Values.Brian J. Garrett - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):337-44.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. The Metaphysics of Mortals: Death, Immortality, and Personal Time.Cody Gilmore - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3271-3299.
    Personal time, as opposed to external time, has a certain role to play in the correct account of death and immortality. But saying exactly what that role is, and what role remains for external time, is not straightforward. I formulate and defend accounts of death and immortality that specify these roles precisely.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. The Indeterminacy of Loss.Mark Greene - 2008 - Ethics 118 (4):633-658.
    Abstract: This paper argues that continua of both genetic and environmental manipulation give rise to cases in which it is indeterminate whether the non-identity problem arises. In clear non-identity cases, impersonal principles can underwrite intuitions of wrongdoing. In clear cases of ordinary personal harm, ordinary ethical thinking about personal compensation augments or supersedes impersonal considerations. Indeterminate cases raise a special problem because it is indeterminate whether personal ethical considerations apply. Might indeterminacy of identity preclude a determinate and ethically justified resolution (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Family Influences on the Formation of Moral Identity in Adolescence: Longitudinal Analyses.Daniel Hart, Robert Atkins & Debra Ford - 1999 - Journal of Moral Education 28 (3):375-386.
    A model of moral identity formation is presented. According to the model, family influences have a direct effect on moral identity development in adolescence, independent of the effects of personality, income and other factors. The model is tested using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (Child Sample), which is constituted of the children born to a representative sample of American women who were between the ages of 14 and 21 in 1979. In general, the results provide support (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Persistence and Time.Katherine Hawley - 2014 - In Steven Luper (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Life and Death. Cambridge University Press. pp. 47-63.
    In this chapter I outline some metaphysical views about time, and about persistence, and discuss how they can help us clarify our thinking about life and death.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Integration and Fragmentation of the Self.Bennett W. Helm - 1996 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):43-63.
    My thesis in this paper is that although one normally identifies with something by virtue of a certain holistic rational pattern both in one's judgments and will and in one's emotions and desires, in certain cases one's judgments and one's emotions can be largely separate sources of one's identity and hence of meaning in one's life. These cases, however, are cases of irrationality in which, roughly, the pattern in one's judgments and will has become disconnected from the pattern in one's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Me and Mine.Peter M. Jaworski & David Shoemaker - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (1):1-22.
    In this paper we articulate and diagnose a previously unrecognized problem for theories of entitlement, what we call the Claims Conundrum. It applies to all entitlements that are originally generated by some claim-generating action, such as laboring, promising, or contract-signing. The Conundrum is spurred by the very plausible thought that a later claim to the object to which one is entitled is a function of whether that original claim-generating action is attributable to one. This is further assumed to depend on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Animal Ethics.Jens Johansson - 2016 - In Stephan Blatti & Paul Snowdon (eds.), Animalism: New Essays on Persons, Animals, and Identity. Oxford University Press.
  31. Reasons and Reductionism.Mark Johnston - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):589.
  32. Moral Status and Personal Identity: Clones, Embryos, and Future Generations.F. M. Kamm - 2005 - Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):283-307.
    In the first part of this article, I argue that even those entities that in their own right and for their own sake give us reason not to destroy them and to help them are sometimes substitutable for the good of other entities. In so arguing, I consider the idea of being valuable as an end in virtue of intrinsic and extrinsic properties. I also conclude that entities that have claims to things and against others are especially nonsubstitutable. In the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Individual and Collective Responsibility.Andrew C. Khoury - 2017 - In Zachary J. Goldberg (ed.), Reflections on Ethics and Responsibility: Essays in Honor of Peter A. French. Springer. pp. 1-20.
    Building on Peter French’s important work, this chapter draws three distinctions that arise in the context of attributions of moral responsibility, understood as the extent to which an agent is blameworthy or praiseworthy. First, the subject of an attribution of responsibility may be an individual agent or a collective agent. Second, the object of the responsibility attribution may be an individual action (or consequence) or a collective action (or consequence). The third distinction concerns the temporal dimension of the responsibility attribution. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Review of David Shoemaker, Personal Identity and Ethics: A Brief Introduction[REVIEW]Amy Kind - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Body Parts and Human Identity.Larisa Kiyashchenko - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 5:41-47.
    Bioethics originated as a specific collective response of representatives of biomedical sciences, humanities and the public to the complexity of moral, anthropological and ontological problems (often in situations bordering on life and death) caused by the constant development of biomedical technologies. Because of this complexity ‐ these problems escape simple, universal (eternal) solutions. This makes them “finite”, multiple, dependent on the “here and now” circumstances of the choice of cognitive and communicative transdisciplinary strategies. In other words bioethics is a specific (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Did My Brain Implant Make Me Do It? Questions Raised by DBS Regarding Psychological Continuity, Responsibility for Action and Mental Competence.Laura Klaming & Pim Haselager - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):527-539.
    Deep brain stimulation is a well-accepted treatment for movement disorders and is currently explored as a treatment option for various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several case studies suggest that DBS may, in some patients, influence mental states critical to personality to such an extent that it affects an individual’s personal identity, i.e. the experience of psychological continuity, of persisting through time as the same person. Without questioning the usefulness of DBS as a treatment option for various serious and treatment refractory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  37. "American Individualism: Does It Exist?".David Kolb - 1984 - Nanzan Review of American Studies:21-45.
    Does American individualism really exist as it is popularly conceived? Arguments from Hegel and Dewey suggest not. Includes a comparison with equally stereotyped images of Japanese culture.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Shadow People: Relational Personhood, Extended Diachronic Personal Identity, and Our Moral Obligations Toward Fragile Persons.Bartlomiej Lenart - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Alberta
    This Dissertation argues for a care-centrically grounded account of relational personhood and widely realized diachronic personal identity. The moral distinction between persons and non-persons is arguably one of the most salient ethical lines we can draw since many of our most fundamental rights are delineated via the bounds of personhood. The problem with drawing such morally salient lines is that the orthodox, rationalistic definition of personhood, which is widespread within philosophical, medical, and colloquial spheres, excludes, and thereby de-personifies, a large (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Toni Rønnow‐Rasmussen, Personal Value, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2011, 185 Pp., US$ 75 , ISBN 9780199603787. [REVIEW]Olivier Massin - 2015 - Dialectica 69 (2):221-231.
    Personal Values is a delightful and enlightening read. It is teeming with novel insights, ground-breaking distinctions, rich examples, new delineations of the field, refreshing historical reminders, inventive arguments, unprecedented connections, identifications of neglected difficulties, and pioneering proposals. I shall focus here on three of these insights, which are illustrative of the pervasive scrupulousness and inventiveness of the book. The first is that there is a distinction between the supervenience base of values and their constitutive grounds. The second is that FA (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Review of Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke, Harry Silverstein (Eds.), Time and Identity[REVIEW]Ulrich Meyer - 2011 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (1).
  41. Emergence and the Problem of Personal Identity.David Neuburger - 2013 - Dissertation, San Diego State University
    Philosophical theories of personal identity often tacitly assume that either the properties which make us Persons are easily divorced from our bodies, or, that our being Persons is one-and-the-same with our being human beings. While there is broad support both scientifically and philosophically for the contention that our being Persons is at least in part contingent on the proper development and functioning of our brains, the lack of consensus as to the manner in which the brain and mind relate to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Migration, Identité, Généalogie.Stellino Paolo - 2016 - Logoi 2 (5):27-36.
    Cet article a pour but de développer la critique qu’Amartya Sen adresse à la théorie du conflit de Samuel P. Huntington. Plus spécifiquement, je me propose d’appuyer l’idée de Sen, selon laquelle l’identité est toujours plurielle et dynamique, sur la conception de ‘généalogie’ élaborée par Friedrich Nietzsche et, postérieurement, développée par Michel Foucault. Dans un second temps, je reprendrai l’affirmation de Sen, selon laquelle une vision ‘solitariste’ de l’identité humaine s’avère potentiellement dangereuse. Cela permettra de montrer qu’une approche non monolithique (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Parfitians as Exdurantists.Fabio Patrone - 2017 - Axiomathes (6):1-9.
    Derek Parfit’s thesis that identity doesn’t matter in survival has been extensively discussed except for its metaphysical robustness. How can we justify the abandonment of identity in the way Parfit suggests? My argument is the following. Those who want to endorse the thesis that identity doesn’t matter (and, therefore, abandon identity across time) should adopt exdurantism, i.e. a metaphysics according to which the world is composed by temporal parts each existing at a time and according to which there is nothing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Misidentification and the Self.Robert Rovetto - 2011 - In Rienti Jr, Jennifer L. Faux, Laura A. LeVon & Caitlin L. Curtis (eds.), Proceedings of the 2011 Anthropology Graduate Student Association Interdisciplinary Graduate Symposium. University at Buffalo - The State University of New York. pp. 68-80.
    An individual’s sense of self, their sense of identity, is often invaluable to their psychological wellbeing. Yet we find it all too easy to define ourselves in terms of mutable and impermanent things, such as our professional, financial, or interpersonal success. Likewise, we take our mistakes, failures, or rejections to heart, often viewing them as a reflection of our identity, our true self, or as indication of an inherent weakness, problem, superiority or innate talent. By identifying ourselves with these (and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. The Human Being: Understanding Humanity Through God and Reason.Robert J. Rovetto - 2012 - In Dominique Bertrand, A. J. Gottschalk, Erin McDonald & Britta Spaulding (eds.), Convergence: Being Human – The 2nd Annual Anthropology Graduate Student Association Interdisciplinary Symposium. Anthropology Graduate Student Association, Univ. at Buffalo. pp. 49-60.
    In order to understand humanity we must explore and understand our relation to the world, to God and to ourselves. This can be done, in part, by grasping the metaphors in religious texts. More specifically, the symbolism entrenched in Biblical passages and ideas are statements expressing aspects of the human being, the human condition, reality and the relation(s) among them. In this communication I explore these symbolisms following discussion of some preliminary ideas, and explain the former in terms of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Personal Identity, the Self, and Ethics.Ferdinand Santos - 2007 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Going beyond the present controversy surrounding personhood in various non-philosophical contexts, this book seeks to defend the renewed philosophical interest in issues connected with this topic and the need for a more credible philosophical conception of the person. Taking the theory of John Locke as a starting point and in dialogue with contemporary philosophers such as Derek Parfit and P.F. Strawson, the authors develop an original philosophical anthropology based on the writings of Charles Hartshorne and A.N. Whitehead. The authors then (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. The Just Soul.Jeff Sebo - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):131-143.
    Many philosophers think that, if your “day self” and “night self” are physically, psychologically, and narratively continuous with each other, then they are the same unit of moral concern. But I argue that your day self and night self can share all of these relations and still be different units of moral concern, on the grounds that they can share all of these relations and still be in the circumstances of justice. I then argue that this conception of the scope (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48. Compensation and Transworld Personal Identity.George Sher - 1979 - The Monist 62 (3):378-391.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  49. The Stony Metaphysical Heart of Animalism.David Shoemaker - 2016 - In Stephan Blatti & Paul Snowdon (eds.), Animalism. Oxford University Press. pp. 303-328.
    Animalism—the view that the identity across time of individuals like us consists in the persistence of our animal organisms—does poorly at accounting for our identity-related practical concerns. The reason is straightforward: whereas our practical concerns seem to track the identity of psychological creatures—persons—animalism focuses on the identity of human organisms who are not essentially persons. This lack of fit between our practical concerns and animalism has been taken to reduce animalism’s plausibility (relative to psychological criteria of identity). In this paper, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50. Responsibility Without Identity.David Shoemaker - 2012 - Harvard Review of Philosophy 18 (1):109-132.
    It is taken to be platitude that I can be responsible only for my own actions. Many have taken this to entail the slogan that responsibility presupposes personal identity. In this paper, I show that even if we grant the platitude, the slogan is not entailed and is at any rate false. I then suggest what the relevant non-identity relation grounding the ownership of actions consists in instead.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 56