Order:
Disambiguations
J. Anthony Blair [72]Jacob Blair [8]James Blair [4]J. Blair [4]
James R. Blair [4]J. A. Blair [4]John Anthony Blair [3]John D. Blair [1]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also
John Anthony Blair
University of Windsor
Jacob Blair
California State University, Hayward
  1.  36
    Studies in Critical Thinking.John Anthony Blair (ed.) - 2019 - Windsor: University of Windsor.
    Critical thinking deserves both imaginative teaching and serious theoretical attention. Studies in Critical Thinking assembles an all-star cast to serve both.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. The Recent Development of Informal Logic.Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair - forthcoming - Informal Logic: The First International Symposium.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  3.  36
    Probative Norms for Multimodal Visual Arguments.J. Anthony Blair - 2015 - Argumentation 29 (2):217-233.
    The question, “What norms are appropriate for the evaluation of the probative merits of visual arguments?” underlies the investigation of this paper. The notions of argument and of multimodal visual argument employed in the study are explained. Then four multimodal visual arguments are analyzed and their probative merits assessed. It turns out to be possible to judge these qualities using the same criteria that apply to verbally expressed arguments. Since the sample is small and not claimed to be representative, this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  4.  30
    Argumentation as Dialectical.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1987 - Argumentation 1 (1):41-56.
  5.  19
    Argument and Its Uses (OSSA 2005 Keynote Address).J. Anthony Blair - 2004 - Informal Logic 24 (2):137-151.
    Do not define argument by its use to persuade. for other uses of arguments exist. An argument is a proposition and a reason for it. and argumentation is an interchange involving two or more parties resulting in the assertion of one or more arguments coupled with anticipated or actual critical responses. A logically good argument has grounds adeq uate for the purposes at hand (true, probable, plausible, acceptable to the audience) and the grounds provide adequate support for the conclusion. The (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  6.  69
    The Limits of the Dialogue Model of Argument.J. Anthony Blair - 1997 - Argumentation 12 (2):325-339.
    The paper's thesis is that dialogue is not an adequate model for all types of argument. The position of Walton is taken as the contrary view. The paper provides a set of descriptions of dialogues in which arguments feature in the order of the increasing complexity of the argument presentation at each turn of the dialogue, and argues that when arguments of great complexity are traded, the exchanges between arguers are turns of a dialogue only in an extended or metaphorical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  7.  8
    Rhetoric, Dialectic, and Logic as Related to Argument.J. Anthony Blair - 2012 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 45 (2):148.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  8. Neuro-Cognitive Systems Involved in Morality.James Blair, A. A. Marsh, E. Finger, K. S. Blair & J. Luo - 2006 - Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):13 – 27.
    In this paper, we will consider the neuro-cognitive systems involved in mediating morality. Five main claims will be made. First, that there are multiple, partially separable neuro-cognitive architectures that mediate specific aspects of morality: social convention, care-based morality, disgust-based morality and fairness/justice. Second, that all aspects of morality, including social convention, involve affect. Third, that the neural system particularly important for social convention, given its role in mediating anger and responding to angry expressions, is ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Fourth, that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  9.  21
    A Defense of Conduction: A Reply to Adler.J. Anthony Blair - 2016 - Argumentation 30 (2):109-128.
    In Jonathan Adler argued that conductive arguments, as they are commonly characterized, are impossible—that no such argument can exist. This striking contention threatens to undermine a topic of argumentation theory originated by Trudy Govier based on Carl Wellman and revisited by the papers in “Conductive argument, An overlooked type of defeasible reasoning”. I here argue that Adler’s dismissal of conductive arguments relies on a misreading of the term ‘non-conclusive’ used in the characterization of this type of reasoning and argument, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  10.  62
    Walton's Argumentation Schemes for Presumptive Reasoning: A Critique and Development. [REVIEW]J. Anthony Blair - 2001 - Argumentation 15 (4):365-379.
    The aim of the paper is to advance the theory of argument or inference schemes by suggesting answers to questions raised by Walton's Argumentation Schemes for Presumptive Reasoning (1996), specifically on: the relation between argument and reasoning; distinguishing deductive from presumptive schemes, the origin of schemes and the probative force of their use; and the motivation and justification for their associated critical questions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  11. Relevance, Acceptability, and Sufficiency Today.J. Blair - 2007 - Anthropology and Philosophy 8 (1/2):33-48.
    In Logical Self-Defense , Johnson and I introduced the criteria of acceptability, relevance and sufficiency as appropriate for the evaluation of arguments in the sense of reasons offered in support of a claim. These three criteria have been widely adopted, but each has been subjected to a number of criticisms; and also 30 years of research have intervened. How do these criteria stand up today? In this paper I argue that they still have a place in argument analysis and evaluation, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  12.  66
    Informal Logic: An Overview.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 2000 - Informal Logic 20 (2).
    In this overview article, we first explain what we take informal logic to be, discussing misconceptions and distinguishing our conception of it from competing ones; second, we briefly catalogue recent informal logic research, under 14 headings; third, we suggest four broad areas of problems and questions for future research; fourth, we describe current scholarly resources for informal logic; fifth, we discuss three implications of informal logic for philosophy in particular, and take note ofpractical consequences of a more general sort.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  13.  11
    Are Conductive Arguments Really Not Possible?J. Anthony Blair - unknown
    In “Are conductive arguments possible?” Jonathan Adler argued that conductive argu-ments are not possible because they are committed to two incompatible propositions: C is reached without nullifying the counter-considerations; C is accepted is true, which issues in belief, so C is detached from these premises. This paper offers an analysis and an assessment of Adler’s case for his thesis.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14. Honor in the Military and the Possible Implication for the Traditional Separation of Jus Ad Bellum and Jus in Bello.Jacob Blair - 2011 - In Applied Ethics Series (Center for Applied Ethics and Philosophy). pp. 94-102.
    Traditional just war theory maintains that the two types of rules that govern justice in times of war, jus ad bellum (justice of war) and jus in bello (justice in war), are logically independent of one another. Call this the independence thesis. According to this thesis, a war that satisfies the ad bellum rules does not guarantee that the in bello rules will be satisfied; and a war that violates the ad bellum rules does not guarantee that the in bello (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Self-Defense, Proportionality, and Defensive War Against Mitigated Aggression.Jacob Blair - 2013 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):207-224.
    A nation commits mitigated aggression by threatening to kill the citizens of a victim nation if and only if they do not submit to being ruled in a non-egregiously oppressive way. Such aggression primarily threatens a nation’s common way of life . According to David Rodin, a war against mitigated aggression is automatically disproportionate, as the right of lethal self-defense only extends to protecting against being killed or enslaved. Two strategies have been adopted in response to Rodin. The first strategy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  18
    Premissary Relevance.J. Anthony Blair - 1992 - Argumentation 6 (2):203-217.
    Premissary relevance is a property of arguments understood as speech act complexes. It is explicable in terms of the idea of a premise's lending support to a conclusion. Premissary relevance is a function of premises belonging to a set which authoritatively warrants an inference to a conclusion. An authoritative inference warrant will have associated with it a conditional proposition which is true— that is to say, which can be justified. The study of the Aristotelian doctrine of topoi or argument schemes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  17. Reasoning a Practical Guide for Canadian Students.Robert C. Pinto, J. Anthony Blair & Katharine Elizabeth Parr - 1993
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  18.  95
    Argumentation as Rational Persuasion.J. Anthony Blair - 2012 - Argumentation 26 (1):71-81.
    I argue that argumentation is not to be identified with (attempted) rational persuasion, because although rational persuasion appears to consist of arguments, some uses of arguments are not attempts at rational persuasion. However, the use of arguments in argumentative communication to try to persuade is one kind of attempt at rational persuasion. What makes it rational is that its informing ideal is to persuade on the basis of adequate grounds, grounds that make it reasonable and rational to accept the claim (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  37
    The Current State of Informal Logic.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1987 - Informal Logic 9 (2).
  20. Fiona Woollard, Doing and Allowing Harm: Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2015, ISBN: 978-0-19-968364-2, $70, HC. [REVIEW]Jacob Blair - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (3):673-681.
  21. Informal Logic: The First International Symposium.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1981 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 14 (4):251-253.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  22. New Essays in Informal Logic.Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair - 1998 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 31 (2):164-167.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  23. The Evil of Refraining to Save: Liu on the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing.Jacob Blair - 2017 - Diametros 52:127-137.
    In a recent article, Xiaofei Liu seeks to defend, from the standpoint of consequentialism, the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing: DDA. While there are various conceptions of DDA, Liu understands it as the view that it is more difficult to justify doing harm than allowing harm. Liu argues that a typical harm doing involves the production of one more evil and one less good than a typical harm allowing. Thus, prima facie, it takes a greater amount of good to justify (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Tensions in a Certain Conception of Just War as Law Enforcement.Jacob Blair - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (4):303-311.
    Many just war theorists (call them traditionalists) claim that just as people have a right to personal self-defense, so nations have a right to national-defense against an aggressive military invasion. David Rodin claims that the traditionalist is unable to justify most defensive wars against aggression. For most aggressive states only commit conditional aggression in that they threaten to kill or maim the citizens of the nation they are invading only if those citizens resist the occupation. Most wars, then, claimed to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Fundamentals of Argumentation Theory: A Handbook of Historical Backgrounds and Contemporary Developments.Frans H. van Eemeren, Rob Grootendorst, Francisca Snoeck Henkemans, J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson & Erik C. W. Krabbe - 1998 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 31 (1):71-74.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26. Thanks to Our Guest Reviewers of 2001.W. K. Ahn, F. X. Alario, J. Arnold, M. Ashcraft, J. Baird, D. Balota, I. Berent, C. Best, E. Bigand & J. Blair - 2002 - Cognition 83:319-320.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27.  5
    Informal Logic and Logic.J. Anthony Blair - 2009 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 16 (29).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  72
    Autonomy and the Moral Symmetry Principle: Reply to Frowe and Tooley.Jacob Blair - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (4):531-541.
    Helen Frowe has recently objected to Michael Tooley’s famous Moral Symmetry Principle, which is meant to show that in themselves killing and letting die are morally equivalent. I argue that her objection is not compelling but a more compelling objection is available. Specifically, Tooley’s rebuttal of a proposed counter-example to his Moral Symmetry Principle has two problematic implications. First, it undercuts the very principle itself. If we reject the proposed counter-example, then any instance of the Moral Symmetry Principle will actually (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  5
    The Church in Anglo-Saxon Society. [REVIEW]John Blair - 2008 - Speculum 83 (2):405-406.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30.  21
    Informal Logic's Influence on Philosophy Instruction.J. Anthony Blair - 2006 - Informal Logic 26 (3):259-286.
    Informal logic began in the 1970s as a critique of then-current theoretical assumptions in the teaching of argument analysis and evaluation in philosophy departments in the U.S. and Canada. The last 35 years have seen significant developments in informal logic and critical thinking theory. The paper is a pilot study of the influence of these advances in theory on what is taught in courses on argument analysis and critical thinking in U.S. and Canadian philosophy departments. Its finding, provisional and much-qualified, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  7
    A Critical Examination and Development of Wellman’s Theory of Conductive Argument.J. Blair & Dale Hample - unknown
    The paper aims to provide an analysis and critique of Carl Wellman’s account of conduction presented in Challenge and Response and Morals and Ethics. It considers several issues, including: reason-ing vs. argument, the definition vs. the three patterns of conduction, pro and con arguments as dialogues, their assessment, the concept of validity, applications beyond moral arguments, argument type vs. as crite-rion of evaluation.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  8
    Presumptive Reasoning/Argument.J. Anthony Blair - 1999 - ProtoSociology 13:46-60.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33.  24
    Introduction.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1992 - Informal Logic 14 (1).
  34.  46
    Govier's "Informal Logic".J. Anthony Blair - 2013 - Informal Logic 33 (2):83-97.
    In this paper I review a number of Govier’s criticisms of the standard view of logic at the time she was developing her views about the nature of logic as it applies to the critique of arguments in natural language and the development of ways to teach skills in such critique. I argue that the concept of informal logic has emerged at least in part from those criticisms and Govier’s positive alternatives.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  49
    Empathy: A Unitary Circuit or a Set of Dissociable Neuro-Cognitive Systems?James R. Blair & Karina S. Perschardt - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):27-28.
    We question whether empathy is mediated by a unitary circuit. We argue that recent neuroimaging data indicate dissociable neural responses for different facial expressions as well as for representing others' mental states (Theory of Mind, TOM). We also argue that the general empathy disorder considered characteristic of autism and psychopathy is not general but specific for each disorder.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. A Bibliography of Recent Work in Informal Logic.Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair - 1980 - Informal Logic: The First International Symposium 56:163.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37.  7
    Towards a Philosophy of Argument.J. Anthony Blair - unknown
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  24
    Belief and Negation.Jonathan E. Adler & J. Anthony Blair - 2000 - Informal Logic 20 (3).
    This paper argues for the importance of the distinction between internal and external negation over expressions for belief. The common fallacy is to confuse statement like (1) and (2): (1) John believes that the school is not closed on Tuesday; (2) John does not believe that the school is closed on Tuesday. The fallacy has ramifications in teaching, reasoning, and argumentation. Analysis of the fallacy and suggestions for teaching are offered.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39. Defending A Rodinian Account of Self-Defense.Jacob Blair - 2012 - Review Journal of Political Philosophy 9:7-47.
    There’s a widespread intuition that if the only way an innocent person can stop her villainous attacker from killing her is to kill him instead, then she is morally permitted to do so. But why is it that she is permitted to employ lethal force on an aggressor if that is what is required to save her life? My primary goal in this paper is to defend David Rodin's fairly recent and under-recognized account of self-defense that answers this question. There (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  16
    Preface.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 2013 - Informal Logic 33 (2):81-82.
  41.  24
    Argument Management, Informal Logic and Critical Thinking.J. Anthony Blair - 1996 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 15 (4):80-93.
  42.  31
    Norms and Functions in Public Sphere Argumentation.J. Anthony Blair - 2005 - Informal Logic 25 (2):139-150.
    This paper is a commentary on the articles by William Rehg and Robert Asen in this issue of Informal Logic. It compares the subject matter of the two papers, offers an interpretation of and commentary on each paper separately, then discusses their overlapping problematic: the importance of public sphere argumentation.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  18
    The “Logic” of Informal Logic.J. Anthony Blair - unknown
    Are there any logical norms for argument evaluation besides soundness and inductive strength? The paper will look at several concepts or models introduced over the years, including those of Wisdom, Toulmin, Wellman, Rescher, defeasible reasoning proponents and Walton to consider whether there is common ground among them that supplies an alternative to deductive validity and inductive strength.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  12
    Commentary on Freeman.J. Anthony Blair - unknown
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  34
    Misconceptions of Informal Logic: A Reply to McPeck.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1991 - Teaching Philosophy 14 (1):35-52.
  46.  19
    Informal Logic: The Past Five Years 1978-1983.Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair - 1985 - American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (3):181 - 196.
  47.  16
    Critical Review of Arguing With People by Michael Gilbert.J. Anthony Blair - 2017 - Informal Logic 37 (1):70-84.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  14
    Narration as Argument. Paula Olmos, Editor: Springer, Argumentation Library 31, Cham, Switzerland, 2017, Xii, Pp. 1–234, ISBN: 978-3-319-56882-9.J. Anthony Blair - 2019 - Argumentation 33 (1):137-145.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  24
    Critical Thinking as an Educational Ideal.J. Anthony Blair - 1988 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 1 (2):4-4.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  15
    Chapter 11: Strategic Advantage and Social Anathema? [REVIEW]Brad Johnson, B. R. Baliga & John D. Blair - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (1):51 - 61.
    The United States is at a crossroad in its treatment of Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code, which deals with reorganization of bankrupt organizations. It is vital that the issues surrounding the debate be properly framed. This paper attempts to do just that by reviewing the evolution of bankruptcy law, assessing the impact of Chapter 11 leniency on societal stakeholders, considering bankruptcy as a strategic option, and addressing the ethical and societal issues that arise from the use of Chapter 11 (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 94