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Jeffrey Hause [26]Jeffrey Peter Hause [1]
  1. Virtue and Ethics in the Twelfth Century.Jeffrey Hause - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):328-329.
    Jeffrey Hause - Virtue and Ethics in the Twelfth Century - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 328-329 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Jeffrey Hause Creighton University István P. Bejczy and Richard G. Newhauser, editors. Virtue and Ethics in the Twelfth Century. Brill's Studies in Intellectual History, 130. Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2005. Pp. vi + 393. Cloth, $189.00. The essays collected in this fascinating volume on virtue reveal both the increasing (...)
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  2.  7
    Thomas Aquinas and the Voluntarists.Jeffrey Hause - 1997 - Medieval Philosophy & Theology 6 (2):167-182.
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  3.  11
    Right Practical Reason.Jeffrey Hause & Daniel Westberg - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (2):243.
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  4.  22
    Abelard on Degrees of Sinfulness.Jeffrey Hause - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):251-270.
    Like many of his medieval successors, Peter Abelard offers principles for ranking sins. Moral self-knowledge, after all, requires that we recognize not justour sinfulness, but also the extent of our offense. The most important distinction among sins is that between venial and mortal sins: venial sinners show less contempt and may also be victims of bad moral luck, and so they are far less blameworthy. However, the subjective principle which Abelard uses to protect the venial sinner from blame appears to (...)
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  5.  8
    Moral Conscience Through the Ages: Fifth Century BCE to the Present.Jeffrey Hause - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly:pqv094.
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  6.  15
    Swinburne, Richard., Mind, Brain, and Free Will. [REVIEW]Mara McGuire & Jeffrey Hause - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (3):670-672.
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  7.  2
    Aquinas on the Function of Moral Virtue.Jeffrey Hause - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (1):1-20.
    Aquinas is quite clear about the definition of moral virtue and its effects, but he devotes little space to its function: How does it accomplish what it accomplishes?Aquinas’s treatment of the acquired moral virtues in our non-rational appetites reveals that they have at least two functions: they make the soul’s powersgood instruments of reason, and they also calm the appetites so that one can make moral judgments with an unclouded mind. Virtue in the will has a different, “strong directive” function: (...)
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  8.  46
    Voluntariness and Causality.Jeffrey Hause - 1998 - Vivarium 36 (1):55-66.
  9. Thomas Aquinas and the Voluntarists.Jeffrey Hause - 1997 - Medieval Philosophy and Theology 6 (2):167-182.
  10.  26
    Aquinas on Non-Voluntary Acts.Jeffrey Hause - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (4):459-475.
    Aquinas argues that an agent’s act may be voluntary, involuntary, or even nonvoluntary. An agent performs a non-voluntary act on these conditions: (a) the agent does not know the act falls under a certain description D, (b) the act under D is not contrary to the agent’s will, and (c) if the agent had known that the act fell under D, the agent would still have performed it. Aquinas’s full account of non-voluntary acts is terse and ambiguous and seems to (...)
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  11.  21
    Aquinas on the Function of Moral Virtue.Jeffrey Hause - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (1):1-20.
    Aquinas is quite clear about the definition of moral virtue and its effects, but he devotes little space to its function: How does it accomplish what it accomplishes?Aquinas’s treatment of the acquired moral virtues in our non-rational appetites reveals that they have at least two functions: they make the soul’s powersgood instruments of reason, and they also calm the appetites so that one can make moral judgments with an unclouded mind. Virtue in the will has a different, “strong directive” function: (...)
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  12. Joseph P. Wawrykow, God's Grace and Human Action:“Merit” in the Theology of Thomas Aquinas. Notre Dame, Ind., and London: University of Notre Dame Press, 1995. Pp. X, 293. $39.95. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 1999 - Speculum 74 (2):533-534.
     
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  13.  5
    God's Grace and Human Action: “Merit” in the Theology of Thomas Aquinas. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 1999 - Speculum 74 (2):533-534.
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  14. Bonnie Kent, Virtues of the Will: The Transformation of Ethics in the Late Thirteenth Century. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 1995. Pp. Ix, 270. $44.95. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 1997 - Speculum 72 (4):1189-1191.
     
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  15.  3
    Virtues of the Will: The Transformation of Ethics in the Late Thirteenth Century. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 1997 - Speculum 72 (4):1189-1191.
  16. Risto Saarinen, Weakness of the Will in Medieval Thought: From Augustine to Buridan.(Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters, 44.) Leiden, New York, and Cologne: EJ Brill, 1994. Pp. Vii, 207. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 1996 - Speculum 71 (3):759-760.
     
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  17.  1
    God's Grace and Human Action: "Merit" in the Theology of Thomas Aquinas.Joseph P. Wawrykow.Jeffrey Hause - 1999 - Speculum 74 (2):533-534.
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  18.  1
    Virtues of the Will: The Transformation of Ethics in the Late Thirteenth Century.Bonnie Kent.Jeffrey Hause - 1997 - Speculum 72 (4):1189-1191.
  19.  1
    Weakness of the Will in Medieval Thought: From Augustine to Buridan. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 1996 - Speculum 71 (3):759-760.
    This volume examines the medieval understanding of Aristotle's "weakness of the will" . The medieval views are outlined on the basis of five major commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics between 1250 and 1350.
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  20.  1
    Review of Jon Marenbon, Boethius[REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 2003 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (12).
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  21. Aquinas: Basic Works.Jeffrey Hause & Robert Pasnau (eds.) - 2014 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Drawn from a wide range of writings and featuring state-of-the-art translations, _Basic Works_ offers convenient access to Thomas Aquinas' most important discussions of nature, being and essence, divine and human nature, and ethics and human action. The translations all capture Aquinas's sharp, transparent style and display terminological consistency. Many were originally published in the acclaimed translation-cum-commentary series _The Hackett Aquinas_, edited by Robert Pasnau and Jeffrey Hause. Others appear here for the first time: Eleonore Stump and Stephen Chanderbahn's translation of (...)
     
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  22. Abelard on Degrees of Sinfulness.Jeffrey Hause - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):251-270.
    Like many of his medieval successors, Peter Abelard offers principles for ranking sins. Moral self-knowledge, after all, requires that we recognize not justour sinfulness, but also the extent of our offense. The most important distinction among sins is that between venial and mortal sins: venial sinners show less contempt and may also be victims of bad moral luck, and so they are far less blameworthy. However, the subjective principle which Abelard uses to protect the venial sinner from blame appears to (...)
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  23. Aquinas on Friendship. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 2007 - The Medieval Review 10.
  24. Debates in Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses.Jeffrey Hause (ed.) - 2014 - Routledge.
    Debates in Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses aims to de-mystify medieval works by offering an illuminating, engaging introduction to the problems that medieval philosophers from Augustine through Ockham wrestled with. Each of the volume’s 11 units presents a debate that will enable students to return to the primary texts prepared to think critically and imaginatively about them. Debates include: Does Anselm have a hierarchical or a flat conception of free will? Is Abelard’s ethics conceptually impoverished? Does Avicenna teach (...)
     
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  25. Thomas Aquinas and the Voluntarists.Jeffrey Hause - 1997 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 6 (2):167-182.
     
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  26. Weakness of the Will in Medieval Thought: From Augustine to Buridan.Risto Saarinen.Jeffrey Hause - 1996 - Speculum 71 (3):759-760.