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  1. Value-Based Theories of Reasons and Matters of Taste: Aquinas on the Limitations of Reason Alone.Seyyed Mohsen Eslami - 2018 - Divus Thomas 121 (3):371-377.
    In this paper, I explore one line of argument for the Humean Theory of Reasons, the view that all normative reasons are based on desires. Then, I suggest a way to block that argument inspired by Aquinas’s discussions on choice, will, and indeterminacy of reason alone.
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  2. Edition de la question ordinaire n° 18, « de intensione virtutum”, de Godefroid de Fontaines.Jean-Luc Solere & Jean Céleyrette - 2009 - In José Meirinhos & Olga Weijers (eds.), Florilegium Medievale. Études offertes à Jacqueline Hamesse. 2300 Turnhout, Belgium: pp. 83-107.
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  3. Dominican Debates on the Intensification of Qualities at the Beginning of the 14th Century.Jean-Luc Solere - 2020 - In Andreas Speer & Andrea Colli (eds.), Censures, Condemnations, Corrections in Late Medieval Schools. Leuven, Belgium: pp. 293-346.
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  4. A COMPOSIÇÃO REAL DA PROPOSIÇÃO MENTAL OCKHAMIANA.Ernesto Perini-Santos - 2005 - Analytica. Revista de Filosofia 9 (1):67-92.
    A linguagem mental explica o caráter significativo das linguagens falada e escrita: seus elementos e estrutura são identificados através de critérios teóricos que servem a este fim. Estes critérios parecem manter uma certa indeterminação em relação aos elementos e estruturas da linguagem mental, se se espera que eles decidam entre diferentes formas de apresentação possíveis. Esta expectativa, contudo, não é razoável dentro da filosofia ockhamiana. A teoria da linguagem mental pode desempenhar os papéis teóricos a ela destinados sem determinar a (...)
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  5. Logical Fictions in Medieval Literature and Philosophy.Virginie Greene - 2014 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, new ways of storytelling and inventing fictions appeared in the French-speaking areas of Europe. This new art still influences our global culture of fiction. Virginie Greene explores the relationship between fiction and the development of neo-Aristotelian logic during this period through a close examination of seminal literary and philosophical texts by major medieval authors, such as Anselm of Canterbury, Abélard, and Chrétien de Troyes. This study of Old French logical fictions encourages a broader theoretical (...)
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  6. Petri Thomae Quaestiones de esse intelligibili.Petrus Thomae & Garrett Smith (eds.) - 2015 - Leuven, Belgium: Leuven University Press.
    First critical edition of Petrus Thomae’s theory of non-causal dependence. This work of Scotist metaphysics is an investigation into the ultimate constitution of things. In the course of this treatise, Petrus Thomae examines whether the essences of things ultimately depend on being thought of by God for their very intelligibility or whether they have it of themselves. Defending in detail the second option, Peter argues that creatures exist independently of the divine intellect in the divine essence. They enjoy real, eternal (...)
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  7. SOME REMARKS ON PETER OF SPAIN'S THEORY OF SUPPOSITIO.Vlad Ile - 2017 - Transylvanian Journal of Multidisciplinary Research in Humanities 22 (1):73-89.
    The present paper aims to reconsider our approaches to the suppositio theory (in the particular case of Peter of Spain`s Summaries of logic) in light of a new hypothesis of the double nature1 of medieval logic. Starting from the existing points of view, i.e. the theory of suppositio as a theory of reference and suppositio as a theory of an untranslatable, this paper will examine their underlying commitments to the nature of medieval logic. Such an analysis will entail for the (...)
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  8. The Political Animal in Medieval Philosophy. A Philosophical Study of the Commentary Tradition C. 1260-1410.Juhana Toivanen - 2021 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    In The Political Animal in Medieval Philosophy Juhana Toivanen investigates what medieval philosophers meant when they argued that human beings are political animals by nature. He analyses the notion of ‘political animal’ from various perspectives and shows its relevance to philosophical discussions concerning the foundations of human sociability, ethics, and politics. -/- Medieval authors thought that social life stems from the biological and rational nature of human beings, and that collaboration with other people promotes prosperity and good life. Toivanen provides (...)
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  9. Perceptual Errors in Late Medieval Philosophy.Juhana Toivanen & José Filipe Silva - 2019 - In Brian Glenney & José Filipe Silva (eds.), The Senses and the History of Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 106-130.
    Perception of the external world is an essential part of the animal (including human) life, both as a source of knowledge and as a way to survive. Medieval authors accepted this view, and despite general concerns about the reliability of the senses in the acquisition of certain and objective knowledge, they thought that for the most part our perceptual system gets things right when it comes to the perceptual features of things—but not always. Our article focuses on thirteenth- and fourteenth-century (...)
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  10. "Medieval Mystics on Persons: What John Locke Didn’T Tell You".Christina VanDyke - 2019 - In Persons: a History. Oxford: pp. 123-153.
    The 13th-15th centuries were witness to lively and broad-ranging debates about the nature of persons. In this paper, I look at how the uses of ‘person’ in logical/grammatical, legal/political, and theological contexts overlap in the works of 13th-15th century contemplatives in the Latin West, such as Hadewijch, Meister Eckhart, and Catherine of Siena. After explicating the key concepts of individuality, dignity, and rationality, I show how these ideas combine with the contemplative use of first- and second-person perspectives, personification, and introspection (...)
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  11. Kritik Über Doyle & Salas (2012): On the Borders of Being and Knowing. Some Late Scholastic Thoughts on Supertranscendental Being.Thomas Dewender - 2015 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 18 (1):273-277.
  12. Kritik Über Magnus & Tummers (2014): Super Euclidem.Christian Jung - 2015 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 18 (1):263-268.
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  13. Kritik Über Zarecki (2014): Cicero’s Ideal Statesman in Theory and Practice.Simon Puschmann - 2015 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 18 (1):244-252.
  14. Kritik über Fidora, Niederberger & Scattola (2013): Phronesis – Prudentia – Klugheit. Das Wissen des Klugen in Mittelalter, Renaissance und Neuzeit.Stefan Düfel - 2014 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 17 (1):260-262.
  15. Review of Lacoste (1998): Dictionnaire Critique de Théologie. [REVIEW]Virginie Pektaş - 1999 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 4 (1):238-240.
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  16. Review of Brach (1996): Heidegger-Platon: Vom Neukantianismus Zur Existentiellen Interpretation des «Sophistes». [REVIEW]Jeff Owen Prudhomme - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):257-260.
  17. Kritik Über Zimmermann (2000): Thomas Lesen.Klaus Kahnert - 2002 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):260-260.
  18. Kritik Über Zimmermann (2000): Thomas Lesen.Klaus Kahnert - 2002 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):260-260.
  19. Kritik über Galling, Nietzsche, Schlechta & Janz (1956–1965/2000/1954/1993): Die Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart. Handwörterbuch für Theologie und Religionswissenschaft. Ungekürzte elektronische Ausgabe der dritten Auflage Werke. [REVIEW]Thomas Curran - 2002 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):238-238.
  20. William of Ockham: Questions on Goodness, Virtue, and the Will.Eric W. Hagedorn (ed.) - forthcoming - Cambridge University Press.
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  21. On Loving God Contrary to a Divine Command: Demystifying Ockham’s Quodlibet III.14.Eric W. Hagedorn - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy.
    Among the most widely discussed of William of Ockham’s texts on ethics is his Quodlibet III, q. 14. But despite a large literature on this question, there is no consensus on what Ockham’s answer is to the central question raised in it, specifically, what obligations one would have if one were to receive a divine command to not love God. (Surprisingly, there is also little explicit recognition in the literature of this lack of consensus.) Via a close reading of the (...)
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  22. San Alberto Magno y las bellas artes.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2020 - de Medio Aevo 14:117-129.
    This article aims to address the widespread thesis according to which medieval scholastics would not handle the idea of fine art. Based on a suggestion by Anzulewicz, the author shows how Albert the Great did understand the peculiarity of fine arts and put them in close relationship with liberal arts. There are fine arts, such as music, which are sought after for their own sake and can, therefore, be considered as fully liberal. In contrast to them, there are other arts (...)
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  23. Thomas of Sutton on Intellectual Habitus.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In Nicolas Faucher & Magali Roques (eds.), The Ontology, Psychology and Axiology of Habits in Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 205-227.
    According to the Dominican Thomas of Sutton, the reception of intelligible species in the potential intellect is in every point similar to the actualization of forms in matter, which means that the potential intellect remains completely passive through the whole process of concept acquisition. However, Sutton adds that when the intelligible species are stored in the memory and aggregate in logically organized clusters, thus becoming intellectual habitus, they have a way of being that is not found in material things, namely, (...)
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  24. Self-Knowledge in Scholasticism.Dominik Perler - 2017 - In Ursula Renz (ed.), Self-Knowledge: A History. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 114-130.
    All medieval philosophers in the Aristotelian tradition agreed that the human intellect is not only able to know other things, but also itself. But how should that be possible? Which cognitive mechanisms are required for self-knowledge? This chapter examines three models that attempted to answer this fundamental question: (i) Thomas Aquinas referred to higher-order acts that make first-order acts and eventually also the intellect itself cognitively present, (ii) Matthew of Aquasparta appealed to introspection, (iii) Dietrich of Freiberg claimed that no (...)
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  25. Durand of Saint-Pourçain’s Cognition Theory: Its Fundamental Principles.Jean-Luc Solere - 2013 - In Medieval Perspectives on Aristotle’s De Anima. Leuven / Louvain-la-Neuve: pp. 185-248.
  26. Sine Qua Non Causality and the Context of Durand’s Early Theory of Cognition.Jean-Luc Solere - 2014 - In A. Speer, F. Retucci, Th Jeschke & G. Guldentops (eds.), Durand of Saint-Pourçain and his Sentences commentary. Historical, Philosophical and Theological Issues. Leuven, Belgium: pp. 185-227.
  27. Duns Scot à Paris. 1302-2002.Olivier Boulnois, Elisabeth Karger, Jean-Luc Solere & Gérard Sondag (eds.) - 2004 - 2300 Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols.
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  28. Sine Qua Non Causality and the Context of Durand’s Early Theory of Cognition.Jean-Luc Solere - 2015 - In A. Speer, F. Retucci, Th Jeschke & G. Guldentops (eds.), Durand of Saint-Pourçain and his Sentences commentary. Historical, Philosophical and Theological Issues. Leuven, Belgium: pp. 185-227.
  29. Intellect and Intellectual Cognition According to James of Viterbo.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In A Companion to James of Viterbo. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 218-248.
    Due to his innatist theory, James of Viterbo brings original answers to a number of late-thirteenth century questions concerning cognition. While he maintains a certain distinction between the soul and its faculties, and among these faculties, he rejects the Aristotelian distinction between agent and patient intellects. Thanks to its predispositions to knowing, the mind is able to be an agent for itself. Correlatively, James rejects the usual conception of abstraction. Neither does the intellect act on the phantasms, nor the phantasms (...)
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  30. James of Viterbo's Innatist Theory of Cognition.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In A Companion to James of Viterbo. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 168-217.
    James of Viterbio is one of the rare medieval authors to sustain a thoroughly innatist philosophy. He borrows from Simplicius the notion of idoneitas (aptitude, predisposition) so as to ground a cognition theory in which external things are not the efficient and formal causes of mental acts. A predisposition has the characteristic of being halfway between potentiality and actuality. Therefore, the subject that has predispositions does not need to be acted upon by another thing to actualize them. External things only (...)
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  31. Thomas of Sutton on Intellectual Habitus.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In The Ontology, Psychology and Axiology of Habits (Habitus) in Medieval Philosophy. pp. 205-227.
    According to the Dominican Thomas of Sutton (ca. 1250–1315), the reception of intelligible species in the potential intellect is in every point similar to the actualization of forms in matter, which means that the potential intellect remains completely passive through the whole process of concept acquisition. However, Sutton adds that when the intelligible species are stored in the memory and aggregate in logically organized clusters, thus becoming intellectual habitus, they have a way of being that is not found in material (...)
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  32. Duns Scotus Versus Thomas Aquinas on Instrumental Causality.Jean-Luc Solere - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 7:147-185.
    The medieval notion of instrumental cause is not limited to what we call today “instruments” or “tools.” It extends way beyond the realm of technology and includes natural entities, for instance, the accidents by which a substance acts on another substance, sensible species in the air acting on a visual faculty, sacraments, bodily organs, and sometimes creatures with respect to God’s action. In all these cases, instrumental causes, like secondary causes in general, are subordinated to a principal cause and contribute (...)
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  33. ‘Everything True Will Be False’: Paul of Venice’s Two Solutions to the Insolubles.Stephen Read - manuscript
    In his Quadratura, Paul of Venice considers a sophism involving time and tense which appears to show that there is a valid inference which is also invalid. His argument runs as follows: consider this inference concerning some proposition A: A will signify only that everything true will be false, so A will be false. Call this inference B. Then B is valid because the opposite of its conclusion is incompatible with its premise. In accordance with the standard doctrine of ampliation, (...)
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  34. Gregory Palamas and the Making of Palamism in the Modern Age. By Norman Russell. Pp. Xii, 272, Oxford University Press, 2019, £65.00. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):354-355.
    The fourteenth-century Greek hesychast and controversialist, Gregory Palamas, has been so successfully cast as "the other" in Western theological discourse that it can be difficult to gain a sympathetic hearing for him. In the first part of this book, Norman Russell traces the historical reception of Palamite thought in Orthodoxy and in the West, and investigates how "Palamism" was constructed in the early twentieth century by both Western and Eastern theologians (principally Martin Jugie and John Meyendorff) for polemical or apologetic (...)
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  35. How Mind, Logic and Language, Have Evolved From Medieval Philosophy to Early Modern Philosophy? A Critical Study.Mudasir A. Tantray - 2018 - World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development 4 (5):222-229.
    This paper determines the state of mind, logic and language in medieval philosophy. It also exhibits the journey from medieval to early modern philosophy. In medieval philosophy, concept of mind was intimately connected soul or spirit with its harmony with religious tradition. Logic and language as well were corresponding with religion and faith. However in early modern philosophy the schema of mind, logic and language were different. These concepts were bailed from the clutches of religious dogmatism and faith towards the (...)
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  36. The Significance of the Idea of Impetus for the Development of Natural Science.Julita Slipkauskaitė - 2019 - The Digital Scholar: Philosopher's Lab 3 (2):104-109.
    scientific progress, natural philosophy of the Late Medieval Period is seen as playing the role of apologetics. For philosophers of science, with their repudiation of metaphysics, the task of providing a rational reconstruction of how scientific progress has occurred is nigh on impossible. Even explanations such as the Popperian and the Kuhnian strain under great difficulty and provide only partly satisfactory results. In his “Logik der Forschung” (1934) Karl Raimund Popper argues that metaphysics plays an accidental part in the emergence (...)
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  37. Teoria degli Universali e Conoscenza della Realtà in Pietro Aureoli.Giacomo Fornasieri - 2019 - Dissertation, KU Leuven
  38. Natural Reason and Supernatural Faith.Thomas M. Osborne - 2019 - In Jeffrey P. Hause (ed.), Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 188-203.
    Some philosophers seem to argue that faith is or should be produced by arguments, whereas others describe faith as non-rational or even irrational. In the Summa Theologiae, Thomas states that arguments and miracles can show that faith is reasonable, even though unaided reason on its own cannot produce an act of faith. The insufficiency of reason for faith is a necessary condition of faith’s freedom and merit. The explanation of this insufficiency lies in the formal object of faith, which makes (...)
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  39. Disembodied Cognition and Assimilation: Thirteenth-Century Debates on an Epistemological Puzzle.Dominik Perler - 2019 - Vivarium 57 (3-4):317-340.
    Medieval Aristotelians assumed that we cannot assimilate forms unless our soul abstracts them from sensory images. But what about the disembodied soul that has no senses and hence no sensory images? How can it assimilate forms? This article discusses this problem, focusing on two thirteenth-century models. It first looks at Thomas Aquinas’ model, which invokes divine intervention: the separated soul receives forms directly from God. The article examines the problems this explanatory model poses and then turns to a second model, (...)
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  40. Andalò di Negro’s De Compositione Astrolabii: A Critical Edition with English Translation and Notes.Bernardo Mota, Samuel Gessner & Dominique Raynaud - 2019 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 73 (6):551-617.
    In this article, we publish the critical edition of Andalò di Negro’s De compositione astrolabii, with English translation and commentary. The mathematician and astronomer Andalò di Negro presumably redacted this treatise on the astrolabe in the 1330s, while residing at the court of King Robert of Naples. The present edition has three purposes: first, to make available a text missing from the previous compilations of works by Andalò di Negro; second, to revise a privately circulated edition of the text; and (...)
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  41. Kavasilas, Nikolaos.Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2019 - Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy.
    Nikolaos Kavasilas was a notable lay theologian of the Greek Orthodox Church. He is regarded as one of the most profound Byzantine theologians of the fourteenth century and one of the foremost Marian theologians in the Greek patristic tradition. He was an original exponent of anthropocentric Mariology and Christocentric theology. A prolific author renowned for his liturgical and sacramental writings, but also concerned with social and political issues. He lived in a period of political strife and theological controversy. He was (...)
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  42. Cognitive Dispositions in the Psychology of Peter John Olivi.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In N. Faucher & M. Roques (eds.), The Ontology, Psychology and Axiology of Habits (Habitus) in Medieval Philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 185-204.
    This chapter discusses Peter John Olivi’s conception of the role of dispositions in sensory cognition from metaphysical and psychological perspectives. It shows that Olivi makes a distinction between two general types of disposition. Some of them account for the ease, or difficulty, with which different persons use their cognitive powers, while others explain why people react differently to things that they perceive or think. This distinction is then applied to Olivi’s analysis of three different psychological operations, where the notion of (...)
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  43. Teaching the Divine Comedy's Understanding of Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2012 - Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture 13 (1):67-76.
    This essay discusses five main topoi in the Divine Comedy through which teachers might encourage students to explore the question of the Divine Comedy’s treatment of philosophy. These topoi are: (1) The Divine Comedy’s representations in Inferno of noble pagans who are allegorically or historically associated with philosophy or natural reason; (2) its treatment of the relationship between faith and reason and that relationship’s consequences for the text’s understanding of the respective authoritativeness of theology and philosophy; (3) representations in the (...)
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  44. Providence, Temporal Authority, and the Illustrious Vernacular in Dante's Political Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2016 - In Nancy van Deusen & Leonard Michael Koff (eds.), Time: Sense, Space, Structure. Leiden: E.J. Brill. pp. 231-260.
    Drawing primarily upon Dante’s three major philosophical treatises (De vulgari eloquentia, Convivio, and Monarchia), this essay explores how Dante’s ethico-political philosophy operates within the crucial tension between the phenomenology of time as the condition for the possibility of human moral development and yet also as, metaphysically speaking, the privation and imitation of eternity. I begin by showing that, in the De vulgari eloquentia, Dante’s understanding of the poetic and rhetorical function of the illustrious vernacular is tied to his political philosophy (...)
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  45. Book Review: Maria Luisa Ardizzone, Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante's Banquet. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2017 - Renaissance Quarterly 70 (4):1625.
    A review of Maria Luisa Ardizzone's Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante’s Banquet. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2016. xii 1 454 pp. $95.
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  46. Book Review: Paul Stern, Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2018 - The Medieval Review 12 (6).
    A review of Paul Stern's Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018).
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  47. Preface: Remembering Consciousness.Martin Klein & Oliver Istvan Toth - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):05-07.
    This issue is dedicated to consciousness in medieval and early modern philosophy of mind. It aims to shed new light on the continuities and innovations during the transition from medieval to early modern philosophy of mind. The four papers, by Sonja Schierbaum, Daniel Schmal, Oliver Istvan Toth, and Philipp N. Müller, focus on consciousness and, more specifically, on one of its less frequently considered aspects: memory.
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  48. Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy, Edited by Gyula Klima: New York: Fordham University Press, 2015, Pp Xiv + 360. US$40. [REVIEW]Nicole Wyatt - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):204-204.
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  49. Petrus Hispanus’ Attributed Works : Searching for New Interpretations.José Meirinhos - 2018 - Enrahonar : Quaderns de Filosofia:355-363.
    Brief introduction to the project on Petrus Hispanus and the papers presented at the Symposium that was part of SOFIME's Congress "De relatione". It includes a sketch of the corpus petrinicum and a presentation of some literary, philosophical and doctrinal problems involved, with a consecutive bibliography of the published works and key studies.
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  50. "Self-Knowledge and the Science of the Soul in Buridan's Quaestiones De Anima".Susan Brower-Toland - 2017 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Questions on the Soul by John Buridan and Others: A Companion to John Buridan's Philosophy of Mind.
    Buridan holds that the proper subject of psychology (i.e., the science undertaken in Aristotle’s De Anima) is the soul, its powers, and characteristic functions. But, on his view, the science of psychology should not be understood as including the body nor even the soul-body composite as its proper subject. Rather its subject is just “the soul in itself and its powers and functions insofar as they stand on the side of the soul". Buridan takes it as obvious that, even thus (...)
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