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  1. Self-Knowledge in Scholasticism.Dominik Perler - 2017 - In Ursula Renz (ed.), Self-Knowledge: A History. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 114-130.
    All medieval philosophers in the Aristotelian tradition agreed that the human intellect is not only able to know other things, but also itself. But how should that be possible? Which cognitive mechanisms are required for self-knowledge? This chapter examines three models that attempted to answer this fundamental question: (i) Thomas Aquinas referred to higher-order acts that make first-order acts and eventually also the intellect itself cognitively present, (ii) Matthew of Aquasparta appealed to introspection, (iii) Dietrich of Freiberg claimed that no (...)
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  2. Durand of Saint-Pourçain’s Cognition Theory: Its Fundamental Principles.Jean-Luc Solere - 2013 - In Medieval Perspectives on Aristotle’s De Anima. Leuven / Louvain-la-Neuve: pp. 185-248.
  3. Sine Qua Non Causality and the Context of Durand’s Early Theory of Cognition.Jean-Luc Solere - 2014 - In A. Speer, F. Retucci, Th Jeschke & G. Guldentops (eds.), Durand of Saint-Pourçain and his Sentences commentary. Historical, Philosophical and Theological Issues. Leuven, Belgium: pp. 185-227.
  4. Duns Scot à Paris. 1302-2002.Olivier Boulnois, Elisabeth Karger, Jean-Luc Solere & Gérard Sondag (eds.) - 2004 - 2300 Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols.
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  5. Sine Qua Non Causality and the Context of Durand’s Early Theory of Cognition.Jean-Luc Solere - 2015 - In A. Speer, F. Retucci, Th Jeschke & G. Guldentops (eds.), Durand of Saint-Pourçain and his Sentences commentary. Historical, Philosophical and Theological Issues. Leuven, Belgium: pp. 185-227.
  6. Intellect and Intellectual Cognition According to James of Viterbo.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In A Companion to James of Viterbo. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 218-248.
    Due to his innatist theory, James of Viterbo brings original answers to a number of late-thirteenth century questions concerning cognition. While he maintains a certain distinction between the soul and its faculties, and among these faculties, he rejects the Aristotelian distinction between agent and patient intellects. Thanks to its predispositions to knowing, the mind is able to be an agent for itself. Correlatively, James rejects the usual conception of abstraction. Neither does the intellect act on the phantasms, nor the phantasms (...)
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  7. James of Viterbo's Innatist Theory of Cognition.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In A Companion to James of Viterbo. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 168-217.
    James of Viterbio is one of the rare medieval authors to sustain a thoroughly innatist philosophy. He borrows from Simplicius the notion of idoneitas (aptitude, predisposition) so as to ground a cognition theory in which external things are not the efficient and formal causes of mental acts. A predisposition has the characteristic of being halfway between potentiality and actuality. Therefore, the subject that has predispositions does not need to be acted upon by another thing to actualize them. External things only (...)
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  8. Thomas of Sutton on Intellectual Habitus.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In The Ontology, Psychology and Axiology of Habits (Habitus) in Medieval Philosophy. pp. 205-227.
    According to the Dominican Thomas of Sutton (ca. 1250–1315), the reception of intelligible species in the potential intellect is in every point similar to the actualization of forms in matter, which means that the potential intellect remains completely passive through the whole process of concept acquisition. However, Sutton adds that when the intelligible species are stored in the memory and aggregate in logically organized clusters, thus becoming intellectual habitus, they have a way of being that is not found in material (...)
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  9. Duns Scotus Versus Thomas Aquinas on Instrumental Causality.Jean-Luc Solere - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 7:147-185.
    The medieval notion of instrumental cause is not limited to what we call today “instruments” or “tools.” It extends way beyond the realm of technology and includes natural entities, for instance, the accidents by which a substance acts on another substance, sensible species in the air acting on a visual faculty, sacraments, bodily organs, and sometimes creatures with respect to God’s action. In all these cases, instrumental causes, like secondary causes in general, are subordinated to a principal cause and contribute (...)
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  10. ‘Everything True Will Be False’: Paul of Venice’s Two Solutions to the Insolubles.Stephen Read - manuscript
    In his Quadratura, Paul of Venice considers a sophism involving time and tense which appears to show that there is a valid inference which is also invalid. His argument runs as follows: consider this inference concerning some proposition A: A will signify only that everything true will be false, so A will be false. Call this inference B. Then B is valid because the opposite of its conclusion is incompatible with its premise. In accordance with the standard doctrine of ampliation, (...)
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  11. How Mind, Logic and Language, Have Evolved From Medieval Philosophy to Early Modern Philosophy? A Critical Study.Mudasir A. Tantray - 2018 - World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development 4 (5):222-229.
    This paper determines the state of mind, logic and language in medieval philosophy. It also exhibits the journey from medieval to early modern philosophy. In medieval philosophy, concept of mind was intimately connected soul or spirit with its harmony with religious tradition. Logic and language as well were corresponding with religion and faith. However in early modern philosophy the schema of mind, logic and language were different. These concepts were bailed from the clutches of religious dogmatism and faith towards the (...)
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  12. The Significance of the Idea of Impetus for the Development of Natural Science.Julita Slipkauskaitė - 2019 - The Digital Scholar: Philosopher's Lab 3 (2):104-109.
    scientific progress, natural philosophy of the Late Medieval Period is seen as playing the role of apologetics. For philosophers of science, with their repudiation of metaphysics, the task of providing a rational reconstruction of how scientific progress has occurred is nigh on impossible. Even explanations such as the Popperian and the Kuhnian strain under great difficulty and provide only partly satisfactory results. In his “Logik der Forschung” (1934) Karl Raimund Popper argues that metaphysics plays an accidental part in the emergence (...)
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  13. Teoria degli Universali e Conoscenza della Realtà in Pietro Aureoli.Giacomo Fornasieri - 2019 - Dissertation, KU Leuven
  14. Natural Reason and Supernatural Faith.Thomas M. Osborne - 2019 - In Jeffrey P. Hause (ed.), Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 188-203.
    Some philosophers seem to argue that faith is or should be produced by arguments, whereas others describe faith as non-rational or even irrational. In the Summa Theologiae, Thomas states that arguments and miracles can show that faith is reasonable, even though unaided reason on its own cannot produce an act of faith. The insufficiency of reason for faith is a necessary condition of faith’s freedom and merit. The explanation of this insufficiency lies in the formal object of faith, which makes (...)
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  15. Disembodied Cognition and Assimilation: Thirteenth-Century Debates on an Epistemological Puzzle.Dominik Perler - 2019 - Vivarium 57 (3-4):317-340.
    Medieval Aristotelians assumed that we cannot assimilate forms unless our soul abstracts them from sensory images. But what about the disembodied soul that has no senses and hence no sensory images? How can it assimilate forms? This article discusses this problem, focusing on two thirteenth-century models. It first looks at Thomas Aquinas’ model, which invokes divine intervention: the separated soul receives forms directly from God. The article examines the problems this explanatory model poses and then turns to a second model, (...)
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  16. Andalò di Negro’s De Compositione Astrolabii: A Critical Edition with English Translation and Notes.Bernardo Mota, Samuel Gessner & Dominique Raynaud - 2019 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 73 (6):551-617.
    In this article, we publish the critical edition of Andalò di Negro’s De compositione astrolabii, with English translation and commentary. The mathematician and astronomer Andalò di Negro presumably redacted this treatise on the astrolabe in the 1330s, while residing at the court of King Robert of Naples. The present edition has three purposes: first, to make available a text missing from the previous compilations of works by Andalò di Negro; second, to revise a privately circulated edition of the text; and (...)
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  17. Kavasilas, Nikolaos.Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2019 - Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy.
    Nikolaos Kavasilas was a notable lay theologian of the Greek Orthodox Church. He is regarded as one of the most profound Byzantine theologians of the fourteenth century and one of the foremost Marian theologians in the Greek patristic tradition. He was an original exponent of anthropocentric Mariology and Christocentric theology. A prolific author renowned for his liturgical and sacramental writings, but also concerned with social and political issues. He lived in a period of political strife and theological controversy. He was (...)
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  18. Cognitive Dispositions in the Psychology of Peter John Olivi.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In N. Faucher & M. Roques (eds.), The Ontology, Psychology and Axiology of Habits (Habitus) in Medieval Philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 185-204.
    This chapter discusses Peter John Olivi’s conception of the role of dispositions in sensory cognition from metaphysical and psychological perspectives. It shows that Olivi makes a distinction between two general types of disposition. Some of them account for the ease, or difficulty, with which different persons use their cognitive powers, while others explain why people react differently to things that they perceive or think. This distinction is then applied to Olivi’s analysis of three different psychological operations, where the notion of (...)
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  19. Teaching the Divine Comedy's Understanding of Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2012 - Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture 13 (1):67-76.
    This essay discusses five main topoi in the Divine Comedy through which teachers might encourage students to explore the question of the Divine Comedy’s treatment of philosophy. These topoi are: (1) The Divine Comedy’s representations in Inferno of noble pagans who are allegorically or historically associated with philosophy or natural reason; (2) its treatment of the relationship between faith and reason and that relationship’s consequences for the text’s understanding of the respective authoritativeness of theology and philosophy; (3) representations in the (...)
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  20. Providence, Temporal Authority, and the Illustrious Vernacular in Dante's Political Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2016 - In Nancy van Deusen & Leonard Michael Koff (eds.), Time: Sense, Space, Structure. Leiden: E.J. Brill. pp. 231-260.
    Drawing primarily upon Dante’s three major philosophical treatises (De vulgari eloquentia, Convivio, and Monarchia), this essay explores how Dante’s ethico-political philosophy operates within the crucial tension between the phenomenology of time as the condition for the possibility of human moral development and yet also as, metaphysically speaking, the privation and imitation of eternity. I begin by showing that, in the De vulgari eloquentia, Dante’s understanding of the poetic and rhetorical function of the illustrious vernacular is tied to his political philosophy (...)
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  21. Book Review: Maria Luisa Ardizzone, Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante's Banquet. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2017 - Renaissance Quarterly 70 (4):1625.
    A review of Maria Luisa Ardizzone's Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante’s Banquet. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2016. xii 1 454 pp. $95.
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  22. Book Review: Paul Stern, Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2018 - The Medieval Review 12 (6).
    A review of Paul Stern's Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018).
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  23. Preface: Remembering Consciousness.Martin Klein & Oliver Istvan Toth - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):05-07.
    This issue is dedicated to consciousness in medieval and early modern philosophy of mind. It aims to shed new light on the continuities and innovations during the transition from medieval to early modern philosophy of mind. The four papers, by Sonja Schierbaum, Daniel Schmal, Oliver Istvan Toth, and Philipp N. Müller, focus on consciousness and, more specifically, on one of its less frequently considered aspects: memory.
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  24. Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy, Edited by Gyula Klima: New York: Fordham University Press, 2015, Pp Xiv + 360. US$40. [REVIEW]Nicole Wyatt - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):204-204.
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  25. Petrus Hispanus’ Attributed Works : Searching for New Interpretations.José Meirinhos - 2018 - Enrahonar : Quaderns de Filosofia:355-363.
    Brief introduction to the project on Petrus Hispanus and the papers presented at the Symposium that was part of SOFIME's Congress "De relatione". It includes a sketch of the corpus petrinicum and a presentation of some literary, philosophical and doctrinal problems involved, with a consecutive bibliography of the published works and key studies.
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  26. "Self-Knowledge and the Science of the Soul in Buridan's Quaestiones De Anima".Susan Brower-Toland - 2017 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Questions on the Soul by John Buridan and Others: A Companion to John Buridan's Philosophy of Mind.
    Buridan holds that the proper subject of psychology (i.e., the science undertaken in Aristotle’s De Anima) is the soul, its powers, and characteristic functions. But, on his view, the science of psychology should not be understood as including the body nor even the soul-body composite as its proper subject. Rather its subject is just “the soul in itself and its powers and functions insofar as they stand on the side of the soul". Buridan takes it as obvious that, even thus (...)
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  27. Causation and Mental Content: Against the Externalist Interpretation of Ockham.Susan Brower-Toland - 2017 - In Magali Elise Roques & Jenny Pelletier (eds.), The Language of Thought in Late Medieval Philosophy. Essays in Honour of Claude Panaccio.
    On the dominant interpretation, Ockham is an externalist about mental content. This reading is founded principally on his theory of intuitive cognition. Intuitive cognition plays a foundational role in Ockham’s account of concept formation and judgment, and Ockham insists that the content of intuitive states is determined by the causal relations such states bear to their objects. The aim of this paper is to challenge the externalist interpretation by situating Ockham’s account of intuitive cognition vis-à-vis his broader account of efficient (...)
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  28. Entre la raison et la perception: La psychologie animale médiévale et la relation entre les humains et les animaux.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In M. Cutino, I. Iribarren & F. Vinel (eds.), La Restauration de la création: Quelle place pour les animaux? Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 275-297.
  29. Marking the Boundaries: Animals in Medieval Latin Philosophy.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In Peter Adamson & Fey Edwards (eds.), Animals: A History. Oxford, UK: pp. 121-150.
    The medieval reception of Aristotle’s theory of animals was rich and multifaceted and included reflection on his psychological theories but also, for instance, his claim that humans are “political animals.” A particular problem for the medievals was demarcating animals, that is, specifying the dividing line between animal and human. This is especially the case given the sophisticated capacities they ascribe to animals, while still retaining a hard and fast distinction between humans as rational and animals as irrational. Authors discussed in (...)
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  30. Perceptual Experience: Assembling a Medieval Puzzle.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In Margaret Cameron (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in the Early and High Middle Ages: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 2. London, UK: pp. 134-156.
  31. Freedom Without Choice: Medieval Theories of the Essence of Freedom.Tobias Hoffmann - forthcoming - In Thomas Williams (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 194-216.
    Medieval authors generally agreed that we have the freedom to choose among alternative possibilities. But most medieval authors also thought that there are situations in which one cannot do otherwise, not even will otherwise. They also thought when willing necessarily, the will remains free. The questions, then, are what grounds the necessity or contingency of the will’s acts, and – since freedom is not defined by the ability to choose – what belongs to the essential character of freedom, the ratio (...)
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  32. Der Philosophiebegriff im florentinischen Renaissanceplatonismus.Jens Lemanski - 2017 - Archiv für Begriffsgeschichte 49:9-44.
    The paper examines the definitions of the concept ‘philosophy’ resp. ‘the philosopher’ in Florentine renaissance Platonism, namely Marsilio Ficino and his scholar Francesco di Zanobi Cattani da Diacceto. Following Socrates and Pythagoras, Ficino distinguishes between mundane philosophy and divine sapientia. In contrast to his teacher, Diacceto’s Aristotelism rejects the Pythagoreanism and connects philosophy with sapientia. In order to show how the differences between Ficino and Diacceto emerge, three more contemporaries are taken into consideration: Christoforo Landino, Angelo Poliziano and Giovanni Pico (...)
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  33. Durand of St.-Pourçain on Cognitive Acts: Their Cause, Ontological Status, and Intentional Character.Peter Hartman - 2012 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    The present dissertation concerns cognitive psychology—theories about the nature and mechanism of perception and thought—during the High Middle Ages (1250–1350). Many of the issues at the heart of philosophy of mind today—intentionality, mental representation, the active/passive nature of perception—were also the subject of intense investigation during this period. I provide an analysis of these debates with a special focus on Durand of St.-Pourcain, a contemporary of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. Durand was widely recognized as a leading philosopher (...)
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  34. Durand of St.-Pourçain on Cognitive Habits: Sent. Bk. 3, D. 23, QQ. 1-2.Peter Hartman - 2017 - In Magali E. Roques & Jennifer Pelletier (eds.), The Language of Thought in Late Medieval Philosophy. Berlin: pp. 331-368.
    Durand of Saint-Pourçain's earliest treatment of cognitive habits is contained in his Sentences Commentary, Book 3, Distinction 23. In the first two questions, he discusses the ontological status of habits and their causal role, establishing his own unique view alongside the views of Godfrey of Fontaines and Hervaeus Natalis. What follows is the Latin text and an English translation of Durand's Sentences (A/B) III, d. 23, qq. 1-2. -/- .
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  35. Côté’s ‘Siger and the Skeptic'.Charles Bolyard - 2011 - In Gyula Klima & Alexander W. Hall (eds.), Medieval Skepticism, and the Claim to Metaphysical Knowledge. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 27-31.
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  36. John Duns Scotus on Matter.Charles Bolyard - 2009 - In Patricia Hanna (ed.), An Anthology of Philosophical Studies: Volume 3. Athens, Greece: pp. 7-16.
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  37. Accidents in Scotus’s Metaphysics Commentary.Charles Bolyard - 2013 - In Charles Bolyard & Rondo Keele (eds.), Later Medieval Metaphysics: Ontology, Language, and Logic. New York, NY, USA: pp. 84-99.
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  38. Henry of Harclay on Knowing Many Things at Once.Charles Bolyard - 2014 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 81 (1):75-93.
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  39. Book Review: John and Thomas-Gospels in Conflict? Johannine Characterization and the Thomas QuestionJohn and Thomas-Gospels in Conflict? Johannine Characterization and the Thomas Question by SkinnerChristopher W.Pickwick, Eugene, Ore., 2009. 248 Pp. $30.00. ISBN 978-1-60608-614-8. [REVIEW]Susan E. Hylen - 2011 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 65 (3):311-311.
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  40. A Preliminary Remark on Patristic Sacramental Doctrine: The Unity of the Sacramental Idea.P. Smulders - 1954 - Bijdragen 15 (1):25-30.
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  41. Creation as Emanation: The Origin of Diversity in Albert the Great’s “On the Causes and the Procession of the Universe”.Thérèse Bonin - 2001 - Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA: University of Notre Dame Press.
  42. English Medieval Graffiti. V. Pritchard.David Kunzle - 1970 - Speculum 45 (2):318-321.
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  43. Mary's Mother: Saint Anne in Late Medieval Europe. Virginia Nixon.Kathleen Ashley - 2006 - Speculum 81 (2):573-575.
  44. Meister Eckharts Mystik im Spannungsfeld von Rhetorik, Philosophie und Spiritualität.Christian Jung - 2017 - In Wolfgang Achtner (ed.), Mystik als Kern der Weltreligionen? Eine protestantische Perspektive. Stuttgart, Germany: Kohlhammer. pp. 83-107.
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  45. Josefa AMAR Y BORBON, Discurso Sobre la Educación Física y Moral de Las Mujeres [Discours Sur l'Éducation Physique Et Morale des Femmes]. Édition de Mª Victoria Lopez-Cordon. Madrid, Ediciones Cátedra de Valencia, Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de la Mujer, 1994, 270 P. [REVIEW]Mónica Bolufer-Peruga - 1997 - Clio 5.
  46. Josefa AMAR Y BORBON, Discurso Sobre la Educación Física y Moral de Las Mujeres [Discours Sur l'Éducation Physique Et Morale des Femmes]. Édition de Mª Victoria Lopez-Cordon. Madrid, Ediciones Cátedra de Valencia, Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de la Mujer, 1994, 270 P. [REVIEW]Mónica Bolufer-Peruga - 1997 - Clio 5.
  47. Essay Review: Oresme Redivivus: Nicole Oresme and the Medieval Geometry of Qualities and Motions. A Treatise on the Uniformity and Difformity of Intensities Known as Tractatus de Configurationibus Qualitatum Et motuumNicole Oresme and the Medieval Geometry of Qualities and Motions. A Treatise on the Uniformity and Difformity of Intensities Known as Tractatus de Configurationibus Qualitatum Et Motuum. Edited with an Introduction, English Translation and Commentary by ClagettMarshall . Pp. Xiv + 714. $15.00.A. G. Molland - 1969 - History of Science 8 (1):106-119.
  48. Essay Review: Oresme Redivivus: Nicole Oresme and the Medieval Geometry of Qualities and Motions. A Treatise on the Uniformity and Difformity of Intensities Known as Tractatus de Configurationibus Qualitatum Et motuumNicole Oresme and the Medieval Geometry of Qualities and Motions. A Treatise on the Uniformity and Difformity of Intensities Known as Tractatus de Configurationibus Qualitatum Et Motuum. Edited with an Introduction, English Translation and Commentary by ClagettMarshall . Pp. Xiv + 714. $15.00.A. G. Molland - 1969 - History of Science 8 (1):106-119.
  49. Ana María Mora-Márquez, The Thirteenth-Century Notion of Signification: The Discussions and Their Origin and Development. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2015. Pp. 256. $142. ISBN: 978-900-429867-5. [REVIEW]Sara L. Uckelman - 2017 - Speculum 92 (4):1223-1225.
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  50. G. Binding & A. Speer, , Mittelalterliches Kunsterleben Nach Quellen des 11. Bis 13. Jahrhunderts, Friedrich Fromman Verlag — Gunther Holzboog GmbH & Co., Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt 1993, 346 P. ISBN 3 7728 1538 3. [REVIEW] Tummers - 1995 - Vivarium 33 (2):258-259.
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