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  1. Teaching the Divine Comedy's Understanding of Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2012 - Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture 13 (1):67-76.
    This essay discusses five main topoi in the Divine Comedy through which teachers might encourage students to explore the question of the Divine Comedy’s treatment of philosophy. These topoi are: (1) The Divine Comedy’s representations in Inferno of noble pagans who are allegorically or historically associated with philosophy or natural reason; (2) its treatment of the relationship between faith and reason and that relationship’s consequences for the text’s understanding of the respective authoritativeness of theology and philosophy; (3) representations in the (...)
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  2. Providence, Temporal Authority, and the Illustrious Vernacular in Dante's Political Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2016 - In Nancy van Deusen & Leonard Michael Koff (eds.), Time: Sense, Space, Structure. Leiden: E.J. Brill. pp. 231-260.
    Drawing primarily upon Dante’s three major philosophical treatises (De vulgari eloquentia, Convivio, and Monarchia), this essay explores how Dante’s ethico-political philosophy operates within the crucial tension between the phenomenology of time as the condition for the possibility of human moral development and yet also as, metaphysically speaking, the privation and imitation of eternity. I begin by showing that, in the De vulgari eloquentia, Dante’s understanding of the poetic and rhetorical function of the illustrious vernacular is tied to his political philosophy (...)
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  3. Dante Alighieri.Winthrop Wetherbee & Jason Aleksander - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Dante’s engagement with philosophy cannot be studied apart from his vocation as a writer, in which he sought to raise the level of public discourse by educating his countrymen and inspiring them to pursue happiness in the contemplative life. He was one of the most learned Italian laymen of his day, intimately familiar with Aristotelian logic and natural philosophy, theology, and classical literature. He is, of course,most famous for having written the Divine Comedy, but in his poetry as well as (...)
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  4. Book Review: Maria Luisa Ardizzone, Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante's Banquet. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2017 - Renaissance Quarterly 70 (4):1625.
    A review of Maria Luisa Ardizzone's Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante’s Banquet. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2016. xii 1 454 pp. $95.
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  5. Book Review: Paul Stern, Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2018 - The Medieval Review 12 (6).
    A review of Paul Stern's Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018).
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  6. Preface: Remembering Consciousness.Martin Klein & Oliver Istvan Toth - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):05-07.
    This issue is dedicated to consciousness in medieval and early modern philosophy of mind. It aims to shed new light on the continuities and innovations during the transition from medieval to early modern philosophy of mind. The four papers, by Sonja Schierbaum, Daniel Schmal, Oliver Istvan Toth, and Philipp N. Müller, focus on consciousness and, more specifically, on one of its less frequently considered aspects: memory.
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  7. "Self-Knowledge and the Science of the Soul in Buridan's Quaestiones De Anima".Susan Brower-Toland - 2017 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Questions on the Soul by John Buridan and Others: A Companion to John Buridan's Philosophy of Mind.
    Buridan holds that the proper subject of psychology (i.e., the science undertaken in Aristotle’s De Anima) is the soul, its powers, and characteristic functions. But, on his view, the science of psychology should not be understood as including the body nor even the soul-body composite as its proper subject. Rather its subject is just “the soul in itself and its powers and functions insofar as they stand on the side of the soul". Buridan takes it as obvious that, even thus (...)
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  8. Causation and Mental Content: Against the Externalist Interpretation of Ockham.Susan Brower-Toland - 2017 - In Magali Elise Roques & Jenny Pelletier (eds.), The Language of Thought in Late Medieval Philosophy. Essays in Honour of Claude Panaccio.
    On the dominant interpretation, Ockham is an externalist about mental content. This reading is founded principally on his theory of intuitive cognition. Intuitive cognition plays a foundational role in Ockham’s account of concept formation and judgment, and Ockham insists that the content of intuitive states is determined by the causal relations such states bear to their objects. The aim of this paper is to challenge the externalist interpretation by situating Ockham’s account of intuitive cognition vis-à-vis his broader account of efficient (...)
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  9. Entre la raison et la perception: La psychologie animale médiévale et la relation entre les humains et les animaux.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In M. Cutino, I. Iribarren & F. Vinel (eds.), La Restauration de la création: Quelle place pour les animaux? Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 275-297.
  10. Marking the Boundaries: Animals in Medieval Latin Philosophy.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In Peter Adamson & Fey Edwards (eds.), Animals: A History. Oxford, UK: pp. 121-150.
    The medieval reception of Aristotle’s theory of animals was rich and multifaceted and included reflection on his psychological theories but also, for instance, his claim that humans are “political animals.” A particular problem for the medievals was demarcating animals, that is, specifying the dividing line between animal and human. This is especially the case given the sophisticated capacities they ascribe to animals, while still retaining a hard and fast distinction between humans as rational and animals as irrational. Authors discussed in (...)
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  11. Perceptual Experience: Assembling a Medieval Puzzle.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In Margaret Cameron (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in the Early and High Middle Ages: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 2. London, UK: pp. 134-156.
  12. Free Will Without Choice: Medieval Theories of the Essence of Freedom.Tobias Hoffmann - forthcoming - In Thomas Williams (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Medieval authors generally agreed that we have the freedom to choose among alternative possibilities. But most medieval authors also thought that there are situations in which one cannot do otherwise, not even will otherwise. They also thought when willing necessarily, the will remains free. The questions, then, are what grounds the necessity or contingency of the will’s acts, and – since freedom is not defined by the ability to choose – what belongs to the essential character of freedom, the ratio (...)
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  13. Der Philosophiebegriff im florentinischen Renaissanceplatonismus.Jens Lemanski - 2017 - Archiv für Begriffsgeschichte 49:9-44.
    The paper examines the definitions of the concept ‘philosophy’ resp. ‘the philosopher’ in Florentine renaissance Platonism, namely Marsilio Ficino and his scholar Francesco di Zanobi Cattani da Diacceto. Following Socrates and Pythagoras, Ficino distinguishes between mundane philosophy and divine sapientia. In contrast to his teacher, Diacceto’s Aristotelism rejects the Pythagoreanism and connects philosophy with sapientia. In order to show how the differences between Ficino and Diacceto emerge, three more contemporaries are taken into consideration: Christoforo Landino, Angelo Poliziano and Giovanni Pico (...)
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  14. Durand of St.-Pourçain on Cognitive Acts: Their Cause, Ontological Status, and Intentional Character.Peter Hartman - 2012 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    The present dissertation concerns cognitive psychology—theories about the nature and mechanism of perception and thought—during the High Middle Ages (1250–1350). Many of the issues at the heart of philosophy of mind today—intentionality, mental representation, the active/passive nature of perception—were also the subject of intense investigation during this period. I provide an analysis of these debates with a special focus on Durand of St.-Pourcain, a contemporary of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. Durand was widely recognized as a leading philosopher (...)
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  15. Durand of St.-Pourçain on Cognitive Habits: Sent. Bk. 3, D. 23, QQ. 1-2.Peter Hartman - 2017 - In Magali E. Roques & Jennifer Pelletier (eds.), The Language of Thought in Late Medieval Philosophy. Berlin: pp. 331-368.
    Durand of Saint-Pourçain's earliest treatment of cognitive habits is contained in his Sentences Commentary, Book 3, Distinction 23. In the first two questions, he discusses the ontological status of habits and their causal role, establishing his own unique view alongside the views of Godfrey of Fontaines and Hervaeus Natalis. What follows is the Latin text and an English translation of Durand's Sentences (A/B) III, d. 23, qq. 1-2. -/- .
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  16. Côté’s ‘Siger and the Skeptic'.Charles Bolyard - 2011 - In Gyula Klima & Alexander W. Hall (eds.), Medieval Skepticism, and the Claim to Metaphysical Knowledge. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 27-31.
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  17. John Duns Scotus on Matter.Charles Bolyard - 2009 - In Patricia Hanna (ed.), An Anthology of Philosophical Studies: Volume 3. Athens, Greece: pp. 7-16.
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  18. Accidents in Scotus’s Metaphysics Commentary.Charles Bolyard - 2013 - In Charles Bolyard & Rondo Keele (eds.), Later Medieval Metaphysics: Ontology, Language, and Logic. New York, NY, USA: pp. 84-99.
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  19. Henry of Harclay on Knowing Many Things at Once.Charles Bolyard - 2014 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 81 (1):75-93.
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  20. A Preliminary Remark on Patristic Sacramental Doctrine: The Unity of the Sacramental Idea.P. Smulders - 1954 - Bijdragen 15 (1):25-30.
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  21. Creation as Emanation: The Origin of Diversity in Albert the Great’s “On the Causes and the Procession of the Universe”.Thérèse Bonin - 2001 - Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA: University of Notre Dame Press.
  22. Meister Eckharts Mystik im Spannungsfeld von Rhetorik, Philosophie und Spiritualität.Christian Jung - 2017 - In Wolfgang Achtner (ed.), Mystik als Kern der Weltreligionen? Eine protestantische Perspektive. Stuttgart, Germany: Kohlhammer. pp. 83-107.
  23. Divine Goodness, Predestination, and the Hypostatic Union: St. Thomas on the Temporal Realization of the Father's Eternal Plan in the Incarnate Son.Roger W. Nutt - 2018 - New Blackfriars 99 (1079):84-96.
    This article considers Aquinas' doctrine of predestination as an eternal reality in God in light of its temporal realization in time by the incarnation of the eternal Son. In particular, Aquinas' repeated recourse to the ratio of the divine goodness as the motive of predestination is documented in conjunction with his teaching on the fittingness of the incarnation. In this light, the relation of the natural sonship of Christ to the grace of adoption is developed by Aquinas as the temporal (...)
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  24. ESTADO E GOVERNO NO PENSAMENTO DE MARSÍLIO DE PÁDUA: RAÍZES MEDIEVAIS DE UMA TEORIA MODERNA.J. L. Ames - 2003 - Ética and Filosofia Política 6 (2):0-0.
    This study brings light to the concepts of State and Government in the thought of Marsilio de Padua pointing out to profoundly modern institutions present in the reflection of this medieval philosopher. We attempt to show that Marsilio de Padua reflects based on Aristotle´s categories, but proposes a State and Government conception different from that common place of medieval politics as he insists on the need of the popular consent as a criterion of political legitimacy. -/- O estudo explicita os (...)
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  25. The Limit Decision Problem and Four-Dimensionalism.Costa Damiano - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):199-216.
    I argue that medieval solutions to the limit decision problem imply four-dimensionalism, i.e. the view according to which substances that persist through time are extended through time as well as through space, and have different temporal parts at different times.
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  26. Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy, Edited by Gyula Klima. [REVIEW]Nicole Wyatt - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):204-204.
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  27. Tommaso d'Aquino: La Teologia Del Filosofo.Alessandro Ghisalberti - 2016 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 71 (4):35-50.
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  28. Simplicius Commentarium in decem Categorias Aristotelis.Orrin Summerell - 2000 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 4 (1):262-262.
  29. Virtue, Money and the Other Goods: A Note on Apol. 30b2-4.Orrin Summerell - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):199-205.
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  30. Fragen An... Thomas Leinkauf.Orrin Summerell - 2001 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 6 (1):197-213.
  31. Questioning … Stephen F. Brown.Olaf Pluta - 2016 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 19 (1):245-264.
  32. Aristotle on Chance Processes. A Note on Physics II 4-6.Christos Y. Panayides - 2016 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 19 (1):21-51.
  33. Olivi on the Metaphysics of Soul.Robert Pasnau - 1997 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 6 (2):109-132.
  34. The Role of Subjectivity in Natural Science.Patrick A. Heelan - 1969 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 43:185.
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  35. Aquinas and Ontotheology Again.Joseph G. Trabbic - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (1-2):45-61.
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  36. Elliptical Orbits and the Aristotelian Scientific Revolution Comment on Groarke.James Franklin - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):169-179.
    The Scientific Revolution was far from the anti-Aristotelian movement traditionally pictured. Its applied mathematics pursued by new means the Aristotelian ideal of science as knowledge by insight into necessary causes. Newton’s derivation of Kepler’s elliptical planetary orbits from the inverse square law of gravity is a central example.
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  37. Can Aristotelianism Make Sense of Perihelion–Aphelion Orbits?Louis Groarke - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):121-168.
    In general historical treatments, one often encounters the idea that Kepler’s and Newton’s discovery of elliptical planetary orbits marked a decisive break with tradition and definitively undermined any possibility of an Aristotelian approach to physics and astronomy. Although Aristotle had no understanding of gravity, I want to demonstrate that elliptical orbits were a refinement of earlier models and that one can produce an Aristotelian account of elliptical orbits once one corrects his crucial mistake about gravity. One interesting side-effect of this (...)
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  38. The Fourfold Division of Opposition in Questions on Aristotle’s “Categories” by Benedict Hesse, Paul of Pyskowice and in the Oldest Cracow Commentary on the Categories Preserved in Cod. Bj 1941.Monika Mansfeld - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):101-120.
    In the first half of the 15ᵗʰ century there was a coherent philosophical system of teaching at the Jagiellonian university, so-called ars vetus, concerning the interpretation of three treatises: Aristotle’s Categories and Hermeneutics and Porphyry’s Isagoge. The question-commentaries on the Categories that have been preserved in several manuscripts show astonishing similarity in solving individual problems – there are three copies of Benedict Hesse’s commentary and one copy of Paul of Pyskowice’s work, moreover, in BJ 1941 there is an anonymous commentary (...)
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  39. Divine Goodness, Predestination, and the Hypostatic Union: St. Thomas on the Temporal Realization of the Father's Eternal Plan in the Incarnate Son.Roger W. Nutt - 2018 - New Blackfriars 99 (1079):84-96.
    This article considers Aquinas' doctrine of predestination as an eternal reality in God in light of its temporal realization in time by the incarnation of the eternal Son. In particular, Aquinas' repeated recourse to the ratio of the divine goodness as the motive of predestination is documented in conjunction with his teaching on the fittingness of the incarnation. In this light, the relation of the natural sonship of Christ to the grace of adoption is developed by Aquinas as the temporal (...)
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  40. Sleepwalking Through the Thirteenth Century: Some Medieval Latin Commentaries on Aristotle’s De Somno Et Vigilia 2.456a24-27. [REVIEW]Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist - 2016 - Vivarium 54 (4):286-310.
    _ Source: _Volume 54, Issue 4, pp 286 - 310 In _De somno et vigilia_, Aristotle states that sleep is an incapacitation of the first sense organ that occurs when the capacity for sensation has been exceeded. In the same treatise, however, Aristotle also mentions the phenomenon of motion and other waking acts performed in sleep and claims that sense perception is a necessary condition for such acts to occur. When the medieval exegesis on the _Parva naturalia_ evolved in the (...)
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  41. Sextus Empiricus’ Outlines of Pyrrhonism in the Middle Ages.Roland Wittwer - 2016 - Vivarium 54 (4):255-285.
    _ Source: _Volume 54, Issue 4, pp 255 - 285 This paper examines the authorship and reception of the medieval translation of Sextus Empiricus’ _Outlines of Pyrrhonism_. It is shown that its traditional ascription to Niccolò da Reggio cannot be maintained, because the translation must have circulated already in the late 1270s. Its author is difficult to identify: the closest stylistic parallels are found with the anonymous translator of Aristotle’s _De partibus animalium_. With Alvaro of Oviedo and the otherwise unknown (...)
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  42. Petri Thomae Quaestiones de Esse Intelligibili, Written by Garrett R. Smith.Chris Schabel - 2016 - Vivarium 54 (4):357-362.
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  43. Walter Chatton on Enumerating the Categories.Jenny Pelletier - 2016 - Vivarium 54 (4):311-334.
    _ Source: _Page Count 24 Although the fourteenth-century Franciscan theologian Walter Chatton did not comment on Aristotle’s _Categories_, he discussed a number of issues relating to categories in his _Lectura_ on the _Sentences_. The author examines his response to the question ‘How many categories are there?’ He gives three methods by which we can arrive at the number of the categories, the last two of which seem to meet his approval. Chatton advocates a strong isomorphism between ontology and semantics: the (...)
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  44. 1. Did Medieval Natural Law Die Out?David Braybrooke - 2001 - In Natural Law Modernized. University of Toronto Press. pp. 1-28.
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  45. 9. Transcendentals Are Of This World.Mario Bunge - 2006 - In Chasing Reality: Strife Over Realism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 218-249.
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  46. Qui Tollit: Reflections on the Eucharist.Henry Roper Roper & Arthur Davis - 2005 - In Henry Roper Roper & Arthur Davis (eds.), Collected Works of George Grant: Volume 3. University of Toronto Press. pp. 470-472.
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  47. Chapter 19. For Inserting a New Question in the Pars Prima.S. J. Crowe - 2004 - In S. J. Crowe (ed.), Developing the Lonergan Legacy: Historical, Theoretical, and Existential Themes. University of Toronto Press. pp. 332-346.
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  48. Nicole Oresme.Laurence S. Moss - 2014 - Journal des Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 20 (1):61-70.
    The pantheon of classical liberal thinkers must honor the memory of one brilliant mathematician, scientist, and debunker of superstitious beliefs, the sound-money advocate Nicole Oresme. Although his opposition to the recoinage practices of the French monarchy was not unprecedented in the fourteenth century, Oresme must be credited with anticipating the “rational expectations” in economics when he distinguished quite forcefully between “preannounced debasement” and “secret debasement” and their effects on the distribution of wealth. Oresme explains that the king should not practice (...)
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  49. Bonaventure on Nature Before Grace. Cullen - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (1):161-176.
    This essay investigates Bonaventure’s account of the original state of human nature and his reasons for holding the theory that God created human beingswithout grace in an actual, historical moment. Bonaventure argues that positing a historical moment before grace is more congruent with the divine order, precisely because it emphasizes the distinction between nature and grace and delays the conferral of grace until man’s desire is elicited and his willingness to cooperate in the divine plan made clear. Bonaventure incorporates Aristotle’s (...)
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  50. Albert the Great and “Univocal Analogy”. Salas - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):611-635.
    In this paper I discuss Albert the Great’s notion of univocal analogy, which he raised in his Commentary on Pseudo-Dionysius’s De divinis nominibus. While other scholars such as Francis Ruello and Alain de Libera have addressed “analogy” as it pertains to Albert, I intend to treat the “univocal” aspect of “univocal analogy” so as to explain how it informs Albert’s teaching on analogy, and how it remains opposed to any pantheistic reduction of God to creature. While my own account remains (...)
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