Results for 'Organic agriculture'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  40
    The Capitalist Composition of Organic: The Potential of Markets in Fulfilling the Promise of Organic Agriculture[REVIEW]Patricia Allen & Martin Kovach - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):221-232.
    Observers of agriculture and theenvironment have noted the recent remarkable growth ofthe organic products industry. Is it possible for thisgrowth in the organics market to contribute toprogressive environmental and social goals? From theperspective of green consumerism, the organics marketis a powerful engine for positive change because itpromotes greater environmental awareness andresponsibility among producers and consumers alike.Given its environmental benefits and its ability touse and alter capitalist markets, organic agricultureis currently a positive force for environmentalism.Still, there are contradictions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  2. Organic Agriculture and the Conventionalization Hypothesis: A Case Study From West Germany. [REVIEW]Henning Best - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):95-106.
    The recent growth in organic farming has given rise to the so-called “conventionalization hypothesis,” the idea that organic farming is becoming a slightly modified model of conventional agriculture. Using survey data collected from 973 organic farmers in three German regions during the spring of 2004, some implications of the conventionalization hypothesis are tested. Early and late adopters of organic farming are compared concerning farm structure, environmental concern, attitudes to organic farming, and membership in (...)-movement organizations. The results indicate that organic farming in the study regions indeed exhibits signs of incipient conventionalization. On average, newer farms are more specialized and slightly larger than established ones and there is a growing proportion of farmers who do not share pro-environmental attitudes. Additionally, a number, albeit small, of very large, highly specialized farms have adopted organic agriculture in the last years. However, the vast majority of organic farmers, new and old ones included, still show a strong pro-environmental orientation. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  41
    Social Sustainability, Farm Labor, and Organic Agriculture: Findings From an Exploratory Analysis. [REVIEW]Aimee Shreck, Christy Getz & Gail Feenstra - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):439-449.
    Much of the attention by social scientists to the rapidly growing organic agriculture sector focuses on the benefits it provides to consumers (in the form of pesticide-free foods) and to farmers (in the form of price premiums). By contrast, there has been little discussion or research about the implications of the boom in organic agriculture for farmworkers on organic farms. In this paper, we ask the question: From the perspective of organic farmers, does “certified (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  4.  19
    Non-Governmental Organizations, Strategic Bridge Building, and the “Scientization” of Organic Agriculture in Kenya.Jessica R. Goldberger - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):271-289.
    This paper contributes to the growing social science scholarship on organic agriculture in the global South. A “boundary” framework is used to understand how negotiation among socially and geographically disparate social worlds (e.g., non-governmental organizations (NGOs), foreign donors, agricultural researchers, and small-scale farmers) has resulted in the diffusion of non-certified organic agriculture in Kenya. National and local NGOs dedicated to organic agriculture promotion, training, research, and outreach are conceptualized as “boundary organizations.” Situated at the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  25
    Confronting Coexistence in the United States: Organic Agriculture, Genetic Engineering, and the Case of Roundup Ready® Alfalfa. [REVIEW]Kristina Hubbard & Neva Hassanein - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):325-335.
    In agriculture, the principle of coexistence refers to a condition where different primary production systems can exist in the vicinity of each other, and can be managed in such a way that they affect each other as little as possible. Coexistence policies aim to ensure that farmers are able to freely grow the crops they choose—be they genetically engineered (GE), non-GE conventional, or organic. In the United States (US), the issue of coexistence has very recently come into sharp (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  21
    Critical Impact Assessment of Organic Agriculture.Xie Biao, Wang Xiaorong, Ding Zhuhong & Yang Yaping - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (3):297-311.
    Based on its productionguideline, organic agriculture has set foritself the goals of minimizing all forms ofpollution and maintaining sustainability of thefarming system. By striving for these goals,organic farming meets the demands of anincreasing number of consumers who are criticalof conventional production methods. This papergives an overview of the present state of theart in the different issues. Possibilities ofand limitations in performing the self-aimedgoals under the basic standards of organicagriculture are discussed. Concerningenvironmental protection, in general, the riskof adverse (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7.  17
    A Gender Sensitive Analysis Towards Organic Agriculture: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach. [REVIEW]Maryam Omidi Najafabadi - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):225-240.
    This study integrates the motivating and challenging elements impacting on the implementation of organic farming practice in Iran. Analysis was based on the results of two surveys; one from organic farmers to determine motivating factors and the other from experts in organic farming to identify challenging factors. These surveys incorporated a gender perspective to enable gender comparison and analysis of the results presents a practical model to support program developers in Iranian organic agriculture. Gender comparison (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  29
    Organic Agriculture’s Approach Towards Sustainability; Its Relationship with the Agro-Industrial Complex, A Case Study in Central Macedonia, Greece.Thodoris Dantsis, Angeliki Loumou & Christina Giourga - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (3):197-216.
    Up to now, several scientific works have noted that the organic sector resembles more and more conventional farming’s structures, what is widely known as the “conventionalization” thesis. This phenomenon constitutes an area of conflict between organic farming’s original vision and its current reality and raises ethical and social questions concerning the structure of agricultural systems of production and their interactions with the socio-economic and natural environment. The main issue of this dialogue is the concept of sustainable agriculture, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  23
    Do Inspection Practices in Organic Agriculture Serve Organic Values? A Case Study From Finland.Laura Seppänen & Juha Helenius - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):1-13.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  27
    Re-Embedding Global Agriculture: The International Organic and Fair Trade Movements. [REVIEW]Laura T. Raynolds - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):297-309.
    The international organic agricultureand fair trade movements represent importantchallenges to the ecologically and sociallydestructive relations that characterize the globalagro-food system. Both movements critique conventionalagricultural production and consumption patterns andseek to create a more sustainable world agro-foodsystem. The international organic movement focuses onre-embedding crop and livestock production in ``naturalprocesses,'' encouraging trade in agriculturalcommodities produced under certified organicconditions and processed goods derived from thesecommodities. For its part, the fair trade movementfosters the re-embedding of international commodityproduction and distribution in ``equitable socialrelations,'' (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  11.  61
    Nature and Nature Values in Organic Agriculture. An Analysis of Contested Concepts and Values Among Different Actors in Organic Farming.Lene Hansen, Egon Noe & Katrine Højring - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (2):147-168.
    The relationship between agriculture and nature is a central issue in the current agricultural debate. Organic Farming has ambitions and a special potential in relation to nature. Consideration for nature is part of the guiding principals of organic farming and many organic farmers are committed to protecting natural qualities. However, the issue of nature, landscape, and land use is not straightforward. Nature is an ambiguous concept that involves multiple interests and actors reaching far beyond farmers. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  9
    Voluntary Standards, Certification, and Accreditation in the Global Organic Agriculture Field: A Tripartite Model of Techno-Politics.Eve Fouilleux & Allison Loconto - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (1):1-14.
    This article analyzes the institutionalization of the global organic agriculture field and sheds new light on the conventionalization debate. The institutions that shape the field form a tripartite standards regime of governance that links standard-setting, certification, and accreditation activities, in a layering of markets for services that are additional to the market for certified organic products. At each of the three poles of the TSR, i.e., for standard-setting, certification, and accreditation, we describe how the corresponding markets were (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  22
    “Loyals” and “Optimizers”: Shedding Light on the Decision for or Against Organic Agriculture Among Swiss Farmers. [REVIEW]Stefan Mann & Miriam Gairing - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):365-376.
    The choice between organic and conventional agriculture for farmers is modeled as an ethical decision. Farmers are either loyal to one of the systems or they optimize between systems. This model is empirically validated through a survey among Swiss farmers. A cluster analysis separates farmers into loyal organic, loyal conventional, and optimizing farmers. However, the three resulting clusters bore some, but not all the necessary characteristics of optimizers and loyals. A probit analysis shows that loyal farmers have (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  73
    An Integral Analysis of the National Standard of Canada for Organic Agriculture.Wade Prpich - 2005 - World Futures 61 (1 & 2):138 – 150.
    This article integrally analyzes the National Standard of Canada for Organic Agriculture (NSCOA) through the application of philosopher Ken Wilber's Integral model. The results of the analysis determined that the NSCOA is predominantly a one-dimensional (exterior), two quadrant (behaviors and systems) policy. The NSCOA neglects the subjective and intersubjective elements of the Integral model and at best achieves physical sustainability and the physiological/behavioral treatment of livestock. Finally, recommendations are made to incorporate the principles of the Integral model into (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  22
    Public Agricultural Researchers: Reactions to Organic, Low Input and Sustainable Agriculture[REVIEW]Aaron Harp & Carolyn Sachs - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (4):58-63.
    This paper offers a preliminary assessment of the reactions of public agricultural researchers to three terms used currently in the debate surrounding reduced input farming systems: organic, alternative, and sustainable agriculture. It is argued that these terms have been appropriated by the land grant system and their critical content removed to make them palatable to more mainstream agricultural researchers. A national sample of agricultural production researchers is explored, and disciplinary differences in attitudes toward the three terms are assessed. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Artificial or Biological? Nature, Fertilizer, and the German Origins of Organic Agriculture.Corinna Treitel - 2015 - In Sharon Kingsland & Denise Phillips (eds.), New Perspectives on the History of Life Sciences and Agriculture. Springer Verlag.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  27
    Facing Food Insecurity in Africa: Why, After 30 Years of Work in Organic Agriculture, I Am Promoting the Use of Synthetic Fertilizers and Herbicides in Small-Scale Staple Crop Production.Don Lotter - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (1):111-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  4
    Food and Deliberation - Industrial Agriculture Vs Organic Agriculture -.Kim Myungsik - 2016 - Environmental Philosophy 21:35-61.
  19.  10
    Thomas R. DeGregori. Origins of the Organic Agriculture Debate. Xviii + 211 Pp., Refs., Index. Ames: Iowa State Press, 2004. $56.99. [REVIEW]Sheldon Krimsky - 2006 - Isis 97 (2):378-379.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  5
    Origins of the Organic Agriculture Debate. [REVIEW]Sheldon Krimsky - 2006 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 97:378-379.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  18
    Organic and Conventional Agriculture: Materializing Discourse and Agro-Ecological Managerialism. [REVIEW]David Goodman - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):215-219.
    This introduction situates key themesfound in papers given at a recent workshop on thechanging material practices, meanings, and regulationof US organic food production. The context is theemergence of an international bio-politics ofagriculture and food and, more particularly in the US,the contradictions of sustainable agriculturemovements catalyzed by the rapid scaling up of organicagriculture from a niche activity to nascentindustry.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  22.  23
    The Social Construction of Production Externalities in Contemporary Agriculture: Process Versus Product Standards as the Basis for Defining “Organic”. [REVIEW]B. James Deaton & John P. Hoehn - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (1):31-38.
    The analysis distinguishes two types of standards for defining organic produce; process standards and product standards. Process standards define organic products by the method and means of production. Product standards define organic by the physical quality of the end product. The National Organic Program (NOP) uses process standards as the basis for defining organic. However, the situation is complicated by agricultural production practices, which sometimes result in the migration of NOP prohibited substances from conventional to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  34
    Alternative Modes of Governance: Organic as Civic Engagement. [REVIEW]E. Melanie DuPuis & Sean Gillon - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):43-56.
    A major strategy in the creation of sustainable economies is the establishment of alternative market institutions, such as fair trade and local market systems. However, the dynamics of these alternative markets are poorly understood. What are the rules of behavior by which these markets function? How do these markets maintain their separate identity as “alternative”: apart from the conventional (“free”) market system? Building on Lyson’s notion of civic agriculture, we argue that alternative markets maintain themselves through civic engagement. However, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  24.  30
    Buying Local Organic Food: A Pathway to Transformative Learning. [REVIEW]Sarah Kerton & A. John Sinclair - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (4):401-413.
    Food is a powerful symbol in the struggle to transition to a more sustainable pathway since the food choices citizens make have deep environmental and social impacts within their communities and around the world. Using transformative learning theory, this research explored the learning that took place among individual adults who consumed goods directly from local organic producers, and how this behavior affected their worldview. Learning was classified as instrumental, communicative, or transformative. Ultimately, we considered if the learning created lasting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  67
    Forces Impacting the Production of Organic Foods.Karen Klonsky - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):233-243.
    Roughly 20 percent of organic cropland wasdevoted to produce compared to only 3 percent forconventional agriculture in 1995. At the otherextreme, only 6 percent of organic cropland was incorn production while 25 percent of all croplandproduced corn. Only 30 percent of all organicfarmland was in pasture and rangeland compared to 66percent of all farmland. Clearly, these differencesreflect the greater importance of meat and dairyproduction in agriculture overall than in the organicsubsector. In recent years, the organic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26.  9
    Tourism and Willing Workers on Organic Farms: A Collision of Two Spaces in Sustainable Agriculture.A. Deville, S. Wearing & M. McDonald - forthcoming - .
    The purpose of this paper is to offer a conceptual analysis of the space created by the Willing Workers on Organic Farms host as a part of the organic farming movement and how that space now collides with the idea of tourism heterotopias as the changing market sees WWOOFers who may be less motivated by organic farming and more by a cheaper form of holiday. The resulting contested space is explored looking at the role and delicate balance (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  39
    The Role of the Concept of the Natural (Naturalness) in Organic Farming.Henk Verhoog, Mirjam Matze, Edith Lammerts van Bueren & Ton Baars - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (1):29-49.
    Producers, traders, and consumers oforganic food regularly use the concept of thenatural (naturalness) to characterize organicagriculture and or organic food, in contrast tothe unnaturalness of conventional agriculture.Critics sometimes argue that such use lacks anyrational (scientific) basis and only refers tosentiment. In our project, we made an attemptto clarify the content and the use of theconcepts of nature and naturalness in organicagriculture, to relate this conception todiscussions within bioethical literature, andto draw the implications for agriculturalpractice and policy.Qualitative interviews were (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  28.  20
    Constructing “Green” Foods: Corporate Capital, Risk, and Organic Farming in Australia and New Zealand. [REVIEW]Stewart Lockie, Kristen Lyons & Geoffrey Lawrence - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (4):315-322.
    Public concern over environmentalquality and food safety has culminated in thedevelopment of markets for “green” foods – foodsthat are variously construed as fresh, chemical-free,nutritious, natural, or produced in anenvironmentally-sustainable manner. Understanding theemergence of “green” foods is dependent on analysisboth of the ways in which foods are produced andprocessed, and of the meanings that are attached tothem at each stage of their production,transformation, and consumption. The notion of “green”foods is thereby understood here as a fluid andcontestable signifier that myriad actors involved (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  44
    Bias in Peer Review of Organic Farming Grant Applications.Jesper Rasmussen, Vibeke Langer & Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (2):181-188.
    Peer reviews of 84 organic farming grant applications from Sweden were analyzed to determine whether the reviewers’ affiliation to one of two types of agriculture (i.e., organic and conventional) influenced their reviews. Fifteen reviewers were divided into three groups: (1) scientists with experience in organic farming research; (2) scientists with no experience in organic farming research; and (3) users of organic farming research. The two groups of scientists assessed the societal relevance and scientific quality (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  9
    Cultivating Greater Well-Being: The Benefits Thai Organic Farmers Experience From Adopting Buddhist Eco-Spirituality.Alexander Harrow Kaufman & Jeremiah Mock - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (6):871-893.
    Organic farming is spreading throughout Asia, including in Thailand. Little is known about whether farmers’ values change as they make the shift from conventional farming to organic farming. The benefits farmers perceive from making the shift have also scarcely been studied. We investigated these factors in Northeastern Thailand by conducting observations, key informant interviews, semi-structured interviews and questionnaire interviews. We found that as Thai farmers adopted organic methods, they developed an eco-consciousness. In comparing members of a Buddhist (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Organic Farming-an Environmentally Sound Agriculture.Veena Gandotra, Promila Sharma & Meeta Agrawal - 2008 - In Kuruvila Pandikattu (ed.), Dancing to Diversity: Science-Religion Dialogue in India. Serials Publications. pp. 272.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  31
    Milk in the Multiple: The Making of Organic Milk in Norway. [REVIEW]Stig Larssæther - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (4):409-425.
    The current article looks into the development of an organic market segment in Norway by following organic milk and the controversies that have emerged in the trail of this morally infused artefact. In particular focus is the reformatting of organic milk around the turn of the millennium and the following attempts by various actors to make this product more accessible for a larger group of consumers. The approach favored in this undertaking is actor-network theory (ANT), which stresses (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  25
    Foundations of Production and Consumption of Organic Food in Norway: Common Attitudes Among Farmers and Consumers? [REVIEW]Oddveig Storstad & Hilde Bjørkhaug - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):151-163.
    In Norway, the production andconsumption of organic food is still small-scale. Research on attitudes towards organic farming in Norway has shown that most consumers find conventionally produced food to be “good enough.” The level of industrialization of agriculture and the existence of food scandals in a country will affect consumer demand for organically produced foods. Norway is an interesting case because of its small-scale agriculture, few problems with food-borne diseases, and low market share for organic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  67
    Participatory Organic Certification in Mexico: An Alternative Approach to Maintaining the Integrity of the Organic Label. [REVIEW]Erin Nelson, Laura Gómez Tovar, Rita Schwentesius Rindermann & Manuel Ángel Gómez Cruz - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):227-237.
    Over the past two decades the growth of the organic sector has been accompanied by a shift away from first party, or peer review, systems of certification and towards third party certification, in which a disinterested party is responsible for the development of organic standards and the verification of producer compliance. This paper explores some of the limitations of the third party certification model and presents the case of Mexico as an example of how an alternative form of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35.  21
    Raising Organic: An Agro-Ecological Assessment of Grower Practices in California. [REVIEW]Julie Guthman - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):257-266.
    As the organic food sector has grownand changed to become more mainstream, large-scaleconventional growers have entered into organicproduction. While it is increasingly clear that notall organic farms are self-sufficient small scaleunits that practice poly-cultural agronomy and sell inlocal marketing venues, there still exists apresumption that there are clear lines between thesmall scale ``movement'' farmers who followagro-ecological agronomic ideals and the relativelylarger and partly conventional newcomers who do not.This paper addresses a specific empirical issue, whichis the extent to which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36.  26
    Producing the Natural Fiber Naturally: Technological Change and the US Organic Cotton Industry. [REVIEW]Mrill Ingram - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):325-336.
    Organic cotton productionboomed in the early 1990s only to fall steeplymid-decade. Production is currently rising, butslowly, and has yet to reach previous levels.This is in marked contrast to the steady growthin organic food production during the 1990s.Why, when other areas of organic productionexperienced steady growth, did organic cottonexperience a boom and bust? A study of thecotton production and processing industryreveals a long and heavily industrializedproduction chain that has presented numerouschallenges to growers and processors trying tointroduce an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  70
    Social and Environmental Attributes of Food Products in an Emerging Mass Market: Challenges of Signaling and Consumer Perception, with European Illustrations. [REVIEW]Jean-Marie Codron, Lucie Siriex & Thomas Reardon - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):283-297.
    This paper focuses on the environmental and ethical attributes of food products and their production processes. These two aspects have been recently recognized and are becoming increasingly important in terms of signaling and of consumer perception. There are two relevant thematic domains: environmental and social. Within each domain there are two movements. Hence the paper first presents the four movements that have brought to the fore new aspects of food product quality, to wit: (1) aspects of environmental ethics (organic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  14
    Using Global Organic Markets to Pay for Ecologically Based Agricultural Development in China.Paul Thiers - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (1):3-15.
  39.  18
    Between Ideals and Reality: Development and Implementation of Fairness Standards in the Organic Food Sector. [REVIEW]Melanie Kröger & Martina Schäfer - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):43-63.
    The organic sector is in an ongoing, but somewhat ambiguous, process of differentiation. Continuing growth has also entailed intensified competition and the emergence of conventional structures within the sector. Producers are under pressure to adapt their terms of production to these developments, bearing the risk that the original values and principles of organic farming may become irrelevant. To confront these tendencies and maintain their position on the market, organic producers and processors have launched a number of (...)–fair initiatives. As some consumers attach importance to ethical aspects of consumption, these actors sense market opportunities in such quality differentiation. This article presents results of a study on current organic–fair criteria, as formulated by such initiatives. All of them define standards of distributive, procedural and informational fairness, with fair prices for producers and processors and long-term agreements being core standards. We show that distributive and procedural fairness are closely linked. Although organic–fair initiatives and their main protagonists focus on external fairness, such as fair prices for farmers, thus far internal concerns, such as minimum wages or employee involvement, are of less importance. The initiatives exemplify the differentiation of quality-oriented organic food producers in highly competitive markets. They have the potential to revitalise the original values of the sector and contribute significantly to ethical standardization therein. In order to make a substantial contribution to future development of the sector, a critical examination of aspects of internal fairness as well as the formulation of appropriate standards in this field is recommended. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  39
    Agents' Perceptions of Structure: How Illinois Organic Farmers View Political, Economic, Social, and Ecological Factors. [REVIEW]Leslie A. Duram - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):35-48.
    Various structural factors influenceorganic farmer decision-making. Analyses that combinestructure and agency provide an opportunity forunderstanding farmers' perceptions of the political,economic, and social ``world'' in which they operate.Rich conversational interviews, conducted with twentycertified organic farmers in Illinois and analyzedwith multiple qualitative methods, show how farmersmediate structural concerns. In addition to political,economic, and social structures, a fourth structure isneeded. Indeed these organic farmers emphasize theimportance of ecological factors in theirdecision-making. Within the perceived economic,political, social, and ecological structures, numeroustopics (i.e., marketing, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  41.  33
    Economics and Energetics of Organic and Conventional Farming.David Pimentel - 1993 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):53-60.
    The use of organic farming technologies has certain advantages in some situations and for certain crops such as maize; however, with other crops such as vegetables and fruits, yields under organic production may be substantially reduced compared with conventional production. In most cases, the use of organic technologies requires higher labor inputs than conventional technologies. Some major advantages of organic production are the conservation of soil and water resources and the effective recycling of livestock wastes when (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  22
    Farm and Market Structure, Industrial Regulation and Rural Community Welfare: Conceptual and Methodological Issues. [REVIEW]Rick Welsh - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):21-28.
    The Goldschmidt Hypothesis posits that rural community welfare is negatively associated with the scale of farms surrounding them. The intervening mechanism that links a farm structure dominated by larger farms to negative rural community welfare outcomes is polarized class structure. There have been a number of studies that have found support for the basic relationship between increasing farm scale and negative rural community outcomes. However, since Walter Goldschmidt’s original study was completed in the 1940s, the agricultural market and farming structures (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  24
    Organic Food Demand: A Focus Group Study Involving Caucasian and African-American Shoppers. [REVIEW]Lydia Zepeda, Hui-Shung Chang & Catherine Leviten-Reid - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):385-394.
    A focus group study using four groups of food shoppers provides insights into consumers’ knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors regarding organic foods. Two focus groups consisted of shoppers who regularly bought organic foods and two focus groups of shoppers who predominantly purchased conventional foods. Participants in one of the conventional groups were all Caucasian; in the other they were all African-American. While familiarity with organic foods was much lower in the African-American group, its members were more receptive and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  29
    How Organic Farmers View Their Own Practice: Results From the Czech Republic. [REVIEW]Lukas Zagata - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):277-290.
    This paper addresses the development of organic agriculture in the Czech Republic, which is seen as a success story among post-communist countries. The relatively short history of organic farming and specific contextual factors raises questions about the nature and meaning of Czech organic farming. The goal of this study was to find out how farmers view their own practice, interpret its symbolic value, and construct its content. This empirical study uses Q methodology aimed at the identification (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  16
    Conventionalization of the Organic Sesame Network From Burkina Faso: Shrinking Into Mainstream. [REVIEW]Laurent C. Glin, Arthur P. J. Mol & Peter Oosterveer - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):539-554.
    This research examines the structure and development of the organic sesame network from Burkina Faso to explain the declining trend in organic sesame export. The paper addresses particularly the question whether the organic sesame network is structurally (re)shaped as a conventional mainstream market or whether it still presents a real alternative to conventional sesame production and trade. It is found that over the last decade organic sesame is increasingly incorporated into mainstream market channels. But contrary to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Spiritual Foundations for the Renewal of Agriculture a Course of Lectures Held at Koberwitz, Silesia, June 7 to June 16, 1924. [REVIEW]Rudolf Steiner & Malcolm Gardner - 1993
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  20
    Farming Alone? What’s Up with the “C” in Community Supported Agriculture.Antoinette Pole & Margaret Gray - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (1):85-100.
    This study reconsiders the purported benefits of community found in Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Using an online survey of members who belong to CSAs in New York, between November and December 2010, we assess members’ reasons for joining a CSA, and their perceptions of community within their CSA and beyond. A total of 565 CSA members responded to the survey. Results show an overwhelming majority of members joined their CSA for fresh, local, organic produce, while few respondents joined (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  48. Food Security and Biodiversity: Can We Have Both? An Agroecological Analysis. [REVIEW]Michael Jahi Chappell & Liliana A. LaValle - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):3-26.
    We present an extensive literature review exploring the relationships between food insecurity and rapid biodiversity loss, and the competing methods proposed to address each of these serious problems. Given a large and growing human population, the persistence of widespread malnutrition, and the direct and significant threats the expanding agricultural system poses to biodiversity, the goals of providing universal food security and protecting biodiversity seem incompatible. Examining the literature shows that the current agricultural system already provides sufficient food on a worldwide (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  49.  70
    The Power of Food.Philip McMichael - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):21-33.
    In the developmentalist era,industrialization has simultaneously transformedagriculture and degraded its natural and culturalbase. Food production and consumption embodies thecontradictory aspects of this transformation. Thispaper argues that the crisis of development hasgenerated two basic responses: (1) the attempt toredefine development as a global project, includingharnessing biotechnology to resolve the food securityquestion, and (2) a series of countermovementsattempting to simultaneously reassert the value oflocal, organic foods, and challenge the attempt on thepart of food corporations and national and globalinstitutions to subject the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  50.  28
    Visions of the Middle Landscape: Organic Farming and the Politics of Nature. [REVIEW]Timothy Vos - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):245-256.
    The proposed federal regulation oforganic agriculture in the United States raisesquestions both about the nature and character oforganic farming, as well as its relation to theagro-food system at large. The regulatory process hasengendered a public debate about conventional andalternative approaches to agricultural production,which in turn raises issues of environmental politicsand society-nature relations. An analysis oftranscripts from public hearings, organic farmingmovement literature, and interviews with organicpractitioners and advocates reveals the broaderecological, social, and political ramifications. Inexamining the proposed federal rule (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000