About this topic
Summary Aesthetics of nature is a sub-field of philosophical ethics, and refers to the study of nature from the aesthetical perspective. In a Post-Modern approach, when an individual engages in aesthetically appreciating nature, they give meaning to it and in that meaning  express and develop themselves. Some describe the appreciation of nature as looking into a special kind of mirror. As a result, we are enriched from having done so, and begin to behave in new beneficial ways otherwise not possible.
Related categories

395 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 395
  1. Philosophy of Animal-Made Art | فلسفه هنرِ جانور-ساخت.Pouya Lotfi Yazdi - manuscript
    In this article, first of all, I (hereafter: the writer) have presented an interpretation of aesthetic universality and it is argued that each definition of art has to admit the aesthetic universality. Next, the writer has argued that there is a relation between creativity and aesthetic universality, and it is claimed that there is the same aesthetic universality by the creative processes, products, and persons, both scientifically and philosophically; and so, the relation represents that aesthetic universality is true. Moreover, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Art and Objects: A Manifesto.Said Mikki - manuscript
    We develop a series of theses on the philosophical aesthetics of design art. A sketch of an outline of a theory of objects is drawn from within a naturalistic worldview, that of abstract materialism and the general, still ongoing, quest to build a comprehensive philosophy of nature encompassing not only the physical world, but also culture, art, and politics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Aesthetic Value of the World.Tom Cochrane - forthcoming - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book defends Aestheticism- the claim that everything is aesthetically valuable and that a life lived in pursuit of aesthetic value can be a particularly good one. Furthermore, in distilling aesthetic qualities, artists have a special role to play in teaching us to recognize values; a critical component of virtue. I ground my account upon an analysis of aesthetic value as ‘objectified final value’, which is underwritten by an original psychological claim that all aesthetic values are distal versions of practical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Artistic Objectivity: From Ruskin’s ‘Pathetic Fallacy’ to Creative Receptivity.Eli I. Lichtenstein - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics:ayaa041.
    While the idea of art as self-expression can sound old-fashioned, it remains widespread—especially if the relevant ‘selves’ can be social collectives, not just individual artists. But self-expression can collapse into individualistic or anthropocentric self-involvement. And compelling successor ideals for artists are not obvious. In this light, I develop a counter-ideal of creative receptivity to basic features of the external world, or artistic objectivity. Objective artists are not trying to express themselves or reach collective self-knowledge. However, they are also not disinterested (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. An Intergenerational Approach to Urban Futures: Introducing the Concept of Aesthetic Sustainability.Sanna Lehtinen - 2020 - In Arto Haapala, Beata Frydrykczak & Mateusz Salwa (eds.), Moving From Landscapes To Cityscapes And Back: Theoretical And Applied Approaches To Human Environments. Łódź, Poland: pp. 111–119.
    The experienced quality of urban environments has not traditionally been at the forefront of understanding how cities evolve through time. Within the humanistic tradition, the temporal dimension of cities has been dealt with through tracing urban or architectural histories or interpreting science-fiction scenarios, for example. However, attempts at understanding the relation between currently existing components of cities and planning based on them, towards the future, has not captured the experience of the temporal layers of cities to a satisfying degree. Contemporary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Desolation Sound: Social Practices of Natural Beauty.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2020 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):266–273.
    Instances of natural beauty are widely regarded as counterexamples to practice-based theories of aesthetic value. They are not. To see that they are not, we require the correct account of natural beauty and the correct account of social practices.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Aesthetic Emotions.Jenefer Robinson - 2020 - The Monist 103 (2):205-222.
    This paper investigates what I call aesthetic emotions in the “traditional” sense going back to Burke and Kant. According to Kant, aesthetic pleasure is disinterested, and so maybe for Kant aesthetic emotions would be too, for Kant, but emotions by their very nature cannot be disinterested. After dismissing the idea that aesthetic emotions are a special kind of distanced emotions or refined emotions, I extract from the writings of Clive Bell, Peter Kivy, and Peter Lamarque the view that aesthetic emotions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Art History, Natural History and the Aesthetic Interpretation of Nature.David T. Schwartz - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (5):537-556.
    This paper examines Allen Carlson's influential view that knowledge from natural science offers the best framework for aesthetically appreciating nature for what it is in itself. Carlson argues that knowledge from the natural sciences can play a role analogous to the role of art-historical knowledge in our experience of art by supplying categories for properly 'calibrating' one's sensory experience and rendering more informed aesthetic judgments. Yet, while art history indeed functions this way, Carlson's formulation leaves out a second role played (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. From Sacrifice to Gift: Aesthetic and Moral Aspects of the Experience of Awe for the Natural Environment.Ionut Untea - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):18-34.
    The multiple aesthetic representations of the sacred throughout our troubled human history account for the variety of the ways the sacred has been appropriated as a regulatory moral and civilizing force by groups and large communities of peoples. Nature has always been part of the everyday life of human beings, and the natural environment has been perceived as a medium for the manifestation of the sacred and as a source of moral behavior. Because of this, humans developed a peculiar relationship (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: The Exchange and Nurturing of Emotions.Claudia Westermann - 2020 - In Jutta Kehrer (ed.), New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 34-37.
    "[..] flowing with the waters, halting with the mountains. In the images of light and wind the ephemeral is inscribed. Time is part of space. The scene performs." -/- The essay "Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: the exchange and nurturing of emotions" by Claudia Westermann included in "New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today" introduces ideas of landscape in traditional Chinese thought. Following the etymology of the Chinese terms for landscape and recognizing that their conceptual focus is on the exchange (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. For an every day life aesthetic: Nature, potency and body in Spinoza and Marx.Daniela Cápona González - 2019 - Alpha (Osorno) 49:9-27.
    Resumen: En el presente artículo se analizan y vinculan las nociones de naturaleza, cuerpo y potencia a partir de Spinoza y Marx, en virtud de los cuales se plantea que la exteriorización del hombre y su esencia es no solo social, sino productiva en el sentido de praxis y actividad de sí mismo y lo social. En este sentido, este acto de producción en el mundo contemporáneo está enmarcado en la experiencia cotidiana de habitar la ciudad, la cual, bajo el (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. The Urgency of Engaging with Oddities and Ambiguities: Reciprocity and Cooperation Visited as Semio-Aesthetic Notions in Bridging Nature and Culture.Jui-Pi Chien - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (227):227-243.
    The notion of the third culture forms the background of the study that seeks to unify humanistic and scientific approaches for a better appreciation of nature, culture, and the arts. This study draws on the kind of emotion and attitude that we may intuit and act out soon after noticing another individual demanding our help in nature and culture. Such feelings as sympathy and empathy, uncertainty and ambiguity, are perceived to be extremely useful in the context of strategy formation and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Kantian Beauty, Fractals, and Universal Community.C. E. Emmer - 2019 - Dialogue and Universalism 29 (2):65-80.
    Benoit B. Mandelbrot, when discussing the global appeal of fractal patterns and designs, draws upon examples from across numerous world cultures. What may be missed in Mandelbrot's presentation is Immanuel Kant’s precedence in recognizing this sort of widespread beauty in art and nature, fractals avant la lettre. More importantly, the idea of the fractal may itself assist the aesthetic attitude which Kantian beauty requires. In addition, from a Kantian perspective, fractal patterns may offer a source for a sense of community (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. A Kantian Reading of Aesthetic Freedom and Complete Human Nature Nourished Through Art in a Classical Chinese Artistic Context.Xiaoyan Hu - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (2):128-143.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I will show that classical Chinese artists adopted either Daoist or Chan Buddhist meditation to cultivate their mind to be in accord with the Dao, and that their view of the...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Kitsch Happens. On the Kitsch Experience of Nature.Max Ryynänen - 2019 - Espes. The Slovak Journal of Aesthetics 9 (2):10-16.
    In Kitsch and Art Tomáš Kulka notes that natural landscapes cannot be called kitsch. Kitsch needs to be produced by a human being, he says. I agree with that. Experience-wise it is more complicated, though. Sometimes kitsch affects our experience of landscapes. It is not just that our overwhelming culture of images affects how we see nature, but that also sugared, sentimental and stereotypical kitsch images of nature, that we see in postcards and social media, affect our experience of e.g. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Aesthetic Preference for Nature Sounds Depends on Sound Object Recognition.Stephen C. Van Hedger, Howard C. Nusbaum, Shannon L. M. Heald, Alex Huang, Hiroki P. Kotabe & Marc G. Berman - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (5):e12734.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. John Muir's Environmental Aesthetics: Interweaving the Aesthetic, Religious, and Scientific.Emily Brady - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):463-472.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Body Aesthetics.Aili Bresnahan - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):111-113.
    £ British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThis unique and sprawling collection of sixteen essays explores a wide range of perspectives on the human body and how it is embodied, lived, viewed, perceived, and constructed by ourselves and by others in both positive and harmful ways. The book’s contributors include philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, and artists, as well as scholars who focus on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Environmental Aesthetics, Ethics, and Ecoaesthetics.Allen Carlson - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):399-410.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20. Moral Cultivation: Japanese Gardens, Personal Ideals, and Ecological Citizenship.Julianne Chung - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):507-518.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. “The Eloquence of Something That has No Language”: Adorno on Hölderlin’s Late Poetry.Camilla Flodin - 2018 - Adorno Studies 2 (1):1-27.
    This article focuses on the importance of Hölderlin for Adorno’s comprehension of the art–nature relationship. Adorno’s most detailed discussion of Hölderlin appears in the essay, “Parataxis: On Hölderlin’s Late Poetry.” Adorno has been accused of projecting his own philosophical beliefs on Hölderlin. However, I will show that there is valid support in Hölderlin’s poetry as well as in his philosophical and poetological writings to reinforce Adorno’s claim that Hölderlin’s late poetry is striving to give voice to what is traditionally thought (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Loving Nature.Dale Jamieson - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):485-495.
    Drawing inspiration from Iris Murdoch, I develop a systematic account of love that countenances love beyond persons. I then show how this account applies to nature, and explain why loving nature matters.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Knowledge, Imagination, and Stories in the Aesthetic Experience of Forests.Jukka Mikkonen - 2018 - Estetika 55 (1):3-24.
    A key dispute in environmental aesthetics concerns the role of scientific knowledge in our aesthetic appreciation of the natural environment. In this article, I will explore this debate by focusing on the aesthetic experience of forests. I intend to question reductive forms of the scientific approach and support the role of imagination and stories in nature appreciation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Nature Aesthetics and the Respect Argument.Glenn Parsons - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):411-418.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. On the Experience of Beauty in Nature, in Mathematics and Science, and in Spirituality.Peter Pruzan - 2018 - In Luk Bouckaert, Knut J. Ims & Peter Rona (eds.), Art, Spirituality and Economics: Liber Amicorum for Laszlo Zsolnai. Springer Verlag. pp. 125-138.
    Why do we experience certain natural phenomena as ‘beautiful’? Although such experiences rely on our senses, the experience of ‘beauty’ is not limited to our perception of phenomena in the external world. We are also able to experience ‘beauty’ abstractly, i.e. with only minimal sensory input. The essay therefore also reflects on beauty encountered not just in nature, but also in mathematics and natural science. Finally, reflection is provided on the beauty that is experienced during spiritual experiences – where there (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Food Landscapes: An Object-Centered Model of Food Appreciation.Matteo Ravasio - 2018 - The Monist 101 (3):309-323.
    In this paper I claim that Allen Carlson’s object-centered model for the aesthetic appreciation of nature could be extended to food. The application of an object-centered model to food requires the identification of appropriate foci of appreciative attention. I claim that knowledge about food function and history is relevant to its appreciation, as is the interplay between the resources of a territory and the way in which these are used by its inhabitants. After having offered a brief application of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. 30 Days Wild and the Relationships Between Engagement With Nature’s Beauty, Nature Connectedness and Well-Being.Miles Richardson & Kirsten McEwan - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Landschaft als Gegenstand der Naturethik.Gesine Schepers - 2018 - In Karsten Berr (ed.), Transdisziplinäre Landschaftsforschung. Grundlagen und Perspektiven. RaumFragen: Stadt – Region – Landschaft. Wiesbaden: pp. 205-218.
    In der naturethischen Debatte gibt es eine Reihe von Argumenten für Naturschutz. So gut wie unbeantwortet ist jedoch bisher die Frage, der sich der vorliegende Beitrag widmet: Zu welcher Art von Landschaft führen naturethische Argumente, wenn man mit ihnen Ernst macht? Der Beitrag stellt zentrale anthropozentrische und physiozentrische Argumente vor und zeigt, dass die Antwort je nach Argument unterschiedlich ausfällt. Landschaft als Gegenstand der Naturethik ist eine vielgestaltige Sache. So kann es gut sein, dass eine Landschaft, die einem naturethischen Argument (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Wie soll der Landschaftsarchitekt mit Natur umgehen?Gesine Schepers - 2018 - In Karsten Berr (ed.), Landschaftsarchitekturtheorie. Aktuelle Zugänge, Perspektiven und Positionen. RaumFragen: Stadt – Region – Landschaft. Wiesbaden: Springer. pp. 227-235.
    Der Landschaftsarchitekt geht bei der Gestaltung von Landschaften immer wieder mit Natur um. Auf welche Weise soll er dies tun? Auf diese Frage gibt der vorliegende, naturethische Beitrag eine Antwort. Zunächst kläre ich, was das Tun des Landschaftsarchitekten ausmacht und was hier unter „Natur“ zu verstehen ist. Zweitens nenne ich drei Argumente dafür, dass der Landschaftsarchitekt Natur schützen soll: Das Existenzargument, das ästhetische Argument in empirisch-demokratischer Form und das pathozentrische Argument. Drittens untersuche ich, wie der Landschaftsarchitekt mit Natur umgehen soll, (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Two Types of a Doctrine of Objectivity in the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature.Fuxing Xue - 2018 - Contemporary Aesthetics 6 (1).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Evaluating Positive Aesthetics.Ned Hettinger - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (3):26-41.
    For in all natural things there is something marvelous.1 None of nature’s landscapes are ugly so long as they are wild.2 Positive aesthetics is the idea that all of nature is beautiful.3 The more qualified version supported here claims that nature—to the extent it is not influenced by humans—is specially and predominantly beautiful. Some of the most prominent figures in environmental aesthetics and ethics have defended PA. Holmes Rolston III was an early proponent: The Matterhorn leaves us in awe, but (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Towards Gratitude to Nature: Global Environmental Ethics for China and the World.Bo R. Meinertsen - 2017 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 12 (2):207-223.
    This paper asks what should be the basis of a global environmental ethics. As Gao Shan has argued, the environmental ethics of Western philosophers such as Holmes Rolston and Paul Taylor is based on extending the notion of intrinsic value to that of objects of nature, and as such it is not very compatible with Chinese ethics. This is related to Gao’s rejection of most—if not all—Western “rationalist” environmental ethics, a stance that I grant her for pragmatic reasons (though I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Naturästhetik in der Planungsethik.Gesine Schepers - 2017 - In Karsten Berr (ed.), Architektur- und Planungsethik. Zugänge, Perspektiven, Standpunkte. RaumFragen: Stadt – Region – Landschaft. Wiesbaden: Springer. pp. 195-203.
  34. Zoltan Somhegyi: Mother Nature’s Exhibition: On The Origins Of The Aesthetics Of Contemporary Northern Landscapes.Zoltán Somhegyi - 2017 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 25 (52).
    In this article Zoltán Somhegyi investigates the aesthetic qualities of Northern landscape representations, with a special focus on how contemporary examples are connected to classical ones. First he examines the history of the aesthetic appreciation of these sites, starting from their early modern reception and from the differentiation of “Northern” and “Mediterranean” landscapes: while the Mediterranean ones were highly valued already from the 15th–16th centuries on, the “wilder” Northern landscapes were admired mainly from Romanticism onwards. This has, among others, an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Aesthetic Appreciation of Landscapes.Jiri Benovsky - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (2):325-340.
    In this article, I want to understand the nature of aesthetic experiences of landscapes. I offer an understanding of aesthetic appreciation of landscapes based on a notion of a landscape where landscapes are perspectival observer-dependent entities, where the 'creator' of the landscape necessarily happens to be the same person as the spectator, and where her scientific (and other) knowledge and beliefs matter for the appreciation to be complete. I explore the idea that appreciating a landscape in this sense has quite (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36. Saving ‘Disinterestedness’ in Environmental Aesthetics: A Defence Against Berleant.Damla Dönmez - 2016 - Estetika 53 (2):149-164.
    The old, historical concept of ‘disinterestedness’ has dominated the tradition of aesthetics for almost two centuries. In environmental aesthetics, a rather recent branch of aesthetics, some scholars such as Arnold Berleant have criticized disinterestedness, claiming that it is not a satisfactory criterion since it views the environment as an artwork. As an alternative, Berleant proposes a theory of the ‘aesthetics of engagement’. I claim that although his main intention is to introduce a comprehensive perception of nature, ‘appreciating nature as nature’, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Ecstatic Naturalism and Aesthetic Transcendentalism on the Creativity of Nature. Guardiano - 2016 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 37 (1):55-69.
    Ecstatic naturalism and classical American philosophy both emphasize the creative possibilities of nature and expound metaphysical views in support of them. Ecstatic naturalism proposes that the creative transformations witnessed at the level of nature natured are sustained and empowered by nature naturing, which consists in innumerable “potencies.” This view has a historical precedence in Charles Peirce’s evolutionary cosmology, most notably in its cosmogonic stage of a “Platonic world” that consists in innumerable aesthetic potentialities. While Peirce’s cosmological position shares some affinities (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Aesthetic Transcendentalism in Emerson, Peirce, and Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Painting.Nicholas Guardiano - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    This book proposes an original philosophy of nature, contributes to our understanding of two of America’s greatest philosophers, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Charles S. Peirce, and examines the philosophical expressions of the art of nineteenth-century American landscape painting.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. The Pig’s Squeak: Towards a Renewed Aesthetic Argument for Veganism.A. Holdier - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):631-642.
    In 1906, Henry Stephens Salt published a short collection of essays that presented several rhetorically powerful, if formally deficient arguments for the vegetarian position. By interpreting Salt as a moral sentimentalist with ties to Aristotelian virtue ethics, I propose that his aesthetic argument deserves contemporary consideration. First, I connect ethics and aesthetics with the Greek concepts of kalon and kalokagathia that depend equally on beauty and morality before presenting Salt’s assertion: slaughterhouses are disgusting, therefore they should not be promoted. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40. The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings.Erman Kaplama - 2016 - Cosmos and History 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Kantian and Nietzschean Aesthetics of Human Nature: A Comparison Between the Beautiful/Sublime and Apollonian/Dionysian Dualities.Erman Kaplama - 2016 - Cosmos and History 12 (1):166-217.
    Both for Kant and for Nietzsche, aesthetics must not be considered as a systematic science based merely on logical premises but rather as a set of intuitively attained artistic ideas that constitute or reconstitute the sensible perceptions and supersensible representations into a new whole. Kantian and Nietzschean aesthetics are both aiming to see beyond the forms of objects to provide explanations for the nobility and sublimity of human art and life. We can safely say that Kant and Nietzsche used the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Reflections on Imitation, Vocal Mimicry, and Entrainment.Anton Killin - 2016 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (2):81-87.
    It is my contention that understanding natural phenomena such as vocal mimicry can bolster theories of the evolution of language and music as well as inform evolutionary and naturalistic aesthetics more generally. In this commentary I present this phenomena as a case study in order to stimulate further aesthetic theorising.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. The Live Creature and The Crooked Tree: Thinking Nature in Dewey and Zhuangzi.Christopher C. Kirby - 2016 - Philosophica 47:61-76.
    This paper will compare the concept of nature as it appears in the philosophies of the American pragmatist John Dewey and the Chinese text known as the Zhuangzi, with an aim towards mapping out a heuristic program which might be used to correct various interpretive difficulties in reading each figure. I shall argue that Dewey and Zhuangzi both held more complex and comprehensive philosophies of nature than for which either is typically credited. Such a view of nature turns on the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Landscapes and Evolutionary Aesthetics.Roger Paden - 2016 - Environment, Space, Place 8 (1):33-55.
    This essay examines the possibility of developing a more complete evolutionary aesthetics that can be used to appraise both natural landscapes and works of landscape architects. For the purpose of this essay, an “evolutionary aesthetics” is an aesthetic theory that is closely connected to Darwin’s theory of evolution. Two types of Darwinian evolutionary aesthetics seem possible; a theory of evolved tastes, such as that developed by Dennis Dutton, and an aesthetics of evolving nature based on Carlson’s positive aesthetics. After, exploring (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. The Aesthetic Experiences of Aura, Awe, and Wonder: Reflections on Their Nature and Relationships.Russell Quacchia - 2016 - Contemporary Aesthetics 14.
    The aim of this essay is to examine the semantic nature and linkage between the experiential phenomena of aura, awe, and wonder, central to matters of the aesthetic experience. In aesthetic commentary these terms are generally used rather loosely, often independently of each other and, most often, without regard to the connections between them. It would seem worthwhile to examine the nature of each of these terms to move toward understanding them and their mutual relationships. The conclusions drawn are that (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Human Nature and Aesthetic Ecosystem Services: Nature in the Service of Humankind and Humankins in the Service of Nature.Sepänmaa Yrjö - 2016 - Contemporary Aesthetics 14.
    The term “ecosystem services” refers to the material and spiritual benefits and goods that we receive from nature, or, in a broad sense, from all kinds of environment. The various forms of such benefits have begun to be called services. Nature serves people by producing the material and spiritual prerequisites for life. This is also the foundation of our aesthetic well-being. Does humankind reciprocally serve nature, or only itself through nature, with the intention of exploiting it? We see when nature (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Aesthetic Experience of Beautiful and Ugly Persons: A Critique.Mika Suojanen - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 8 (1).
    The question of whether or not beauty exists in nature is a philosophical problem. In particular, there is the question of whether artworks, persons, or nature has aesthetic qualities. Most people say that they care about their own beauty. Moreover, they judge another person's appearance from an aesthetic point of view using aesthetic concepts. However, aesthetic judgements are not objective in the sense that the experience justifies their objectivity. By analysing Monroe C. Beardsley's theory of the objectivity of aesthetic qualities, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. An Attempt of Aesthetic Study on Environmental Ethics - Focusing on the “Sublimity of Nature” Concept -. 김민수 - 2016 - Environmental Philosophy 21:63-94.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Evolution and Aesthetics.Evental Aesthetics - 2015 - Evental Aesthetics 4 (2):1-170.
    Is aesthetics a product of evolution? Are human aesthetic behaviors in fact evolutionary adaptations? The creation of artistic objects and experiences is an important aesthetic behavior. But so is the perception of aesthetic phenomena qua aesthetic. The question of evolutionary aesthetics is whether humans have evolved the capacity not only to make beautiful things but also to appreciate the aesthetic qualities in things. Are our near-universal love of music and cute baby animals essential to our species’ evolutionary development, which took (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Beyond the Nature-Culture Dichotomy: A Proposal for Evolutionary Aesthetics.Lorenzo Bartalesi & Mariagrazia Portera - 2015 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):101-111.
    Human aesthetic preferences towards a certain landscape type, a certain bodily traits of the opposite sex, a figurative style rather than another, are embedded in what we call “aesthetic experience”, a complex network of instinctive reactions, emotions, feelings, thoughts, and judgements. Are these preferences universal and species-specific, that is to say are they the same for every member of a particular species? Evolutionary psychologists advocate the universality and species-specificity of the aesthetic preferences. Going back to Darwin's writings, in particular to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 395