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  1. David Appelbaum & Mel Thompson (eds.) (2002). World Philosophy: An Exploration in Words and Images. Vega.
    In one accessible, beautifully designed and illustrated volume, scholars have gathered the major theories and key ideas of world's greatest thinkers. The presentation of material sets this reference apart from other philosophy books by providing both the historical and cultural context of the ideas being explored, and by giving visual expression to the arguments and insights themselves through the artwork of the time. Immerse yourself in both Eastern and Western philosophy, spending time with Plato on knowledge, Aquinas on ethics, Marx (...)
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  2. Susana Nuccetelli (2003). Is "Latin American Thought" Philosophy? Metaphilosophy 34 (4):524-536.
    A durable question in Latin American thought is whether it could amount to a characteristically Latin American philosophy. I argue that, if, as is now widely conceded, there is a role for philosophical analysis in thinking about problems that arise in applied subjects, such as bioethics, environmental ethics, and feminism, then why not also in Latin American thought? After all, the focus of Hispanic thinkers has often been upon the issues that arise in their own experiences of the world, and (...)
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  3. Neville Vivian Pope (1975). Philosophy: An Outline of the Discipline and its Sub-Disciplines. Philosophical Enterprises.
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  4. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther, Free to Universalize or Bound by Culture? Multicultural and Public Philosophy: A White Paper.
    Multiculturalism requires sustained and serious philosophical reflection, which in turn requires public outreach and communication. This piece briefly outlines concerns raised by the philosophy of multiculturalism and, conversely, multiculturalism in philosophy, which ultimately force us to reconsider the philosopher’s own role and responsibility. I conclude with a provocative suggestion of philosophy as /public diplomacy/. (As this is intended to be a piece for a general audience, secondary literature is only referred to in the conclusion. References gladly provided upon request.).
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