Search results for '*Receptor Binding' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    N. Galldiks, A. Thiel, C. Haense, G. R. Fink & R. Hilker (2008). 11 C-Flumazenil Positron Emission Tomography Demonstrates Reduction of Both Global and Local Cerebral Benzodiazepine Receptor Binding in a Patient with Stiff Person Syndrome. Journal of Neurology 255 (9).
    Stiff Person Syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase, the key enzyme in γ -aminobutyric acid synthesis. In order to investigate the role of cerebral benzodiazepinereceptor binding in SPS, we performed [ 11 C]flumazenil positron emission tomography in a female patient with SPS compared to nine healthy controls. FMZ is a radioligand to the postsynaptic central benzodiazepine receptor which is co-localized with the GABA-A receptor. In the SPS patient, we found a global reduction (...)
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  2. Pierre De Meyts (2015). Insulin/Receptor Binding: The Last Piece of the Puzzle? Bioessays 37 (4):389-397.
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  3.  2
    J. Murray‐Rust, A. N. McLeod, T. L. Blundell & S. P. Wood (1992). Structure and Evolution of Insulins: Implications for Receptor Binding. Bioessays 14 (5):325-331.
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  4.  1
    G. Ballard Clive, A. Jennifer, Piggott Margaret, Johnson Mary, O'Brien John, McKeith Ian, Clive Holmes, Peter Lantos, Evelyn Jaros & Robert Perry (2002). Disturbances of Consciousness in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Associated with Alteration in Nicotinic Receptor Binding in the Temporal Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3).
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  5.  1
    Richard J. Katz (1983). Stone's Revised Aminergic Hypothesis and the Functional Significance of Receptor Binding Sensitivity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):555.
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  6.  9
    Colin W. Ward, John G. Menting & Michael C. Lawrence (2013). The Insulin Receptor Changes Conformation in Unforeseen Ways on Ligand Binding: Sharpening the Picture of Insulin Receptor Activation. Bioessays 35 (11):945-954.
  7.  1
    Hector Escriva, Franck Delaunay & Vincent Laudet (2000). Ligand Binding and Nuclear Receptor Evolution. Bioessays 22 (8):717-727.
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  8.  16
    Clive Ballard (2002). Disturbances of Conscious in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Assocated with Alterantion in Nicotonic Receoptor Binding in the Temporal Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):461-474.
    Disturbances of consciousness, including fluctuations in attention and awareness, are a common and clinically important symptom in dementia with Lewy bodies . In the present study we investigate potential mechanisms of such disturbances of consciousness in a clinicopathological study evaluating specific components of the cholinergic system. [3H]Epibatidine binding to the high-affinity nicotinic receptor in the temporal cortex differentiated DLB cases with and without DOC, being 62–66% higher in those with DOC . The were no differences between DLB patients with (...)
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  9.  45
    Lynn C. Robertson (2003). Binding, Spatial Attention and Perceptual Awareness. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4 (2):93-102.
  10.  34
    Kimford J. Meador, P. G. Ray, J. R. Echauz, D. W. Loring & G. J. Vachtsevanos (2002). Gamma Coherence and Conscious Perception. Neurology 59 (6):847-854.
  11.  13
    Stuart K. Archer, Charles Claudianos & Hugh D. Campbell (2005). Evolution of the Gelsolin Family of Actin-Binding Proteins as Novel Transcriptional Coactivators. Bioessays 27 (4):388-396.
    The gelsolin gene family encodes a number of higher eukaryotic actin-binding proteins that are thought to function in the cytoplasm by severing, capping, nucleating or bundling actin filaments. Recent evidence, however, suggests that several members of the gelsolin family may have adopted unexpected nuclear functions including a role in regulating transcription. In particular, flightless I, supervillin and gelsolin itself have roles as coactivators for nuclear receptors, despite the fact that their divergence appears to predate the evolutionary appearance of nuclear (...)
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  12.  16
    Alfredo Pereira Jr (2003). Toward an Explanation of the Genesis of Ketamine-Induced Perceptual Distortions and Hallucinatory States. Brain and Mind 4 (3):307-326.
    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) channel has been proposed to function as a coincidence-detection mechanism for afferent and reentrant signals, supporting conscious perception, learning, and memory formation. In this paper we discuss the genesis of distorted perceptual states induced by subanesthetic doses of ketamine, a well-known NMDA antagonist. NMDAR blockage has been suggested to perturb perceptual processing in sensory cortex, and also to decrease GABAergic inhibition in limbic areas (leading to an increase in dopamine excitability). We propose that perceptual distortions and (...)
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  13.  18
    Alfredo Pereira & Gene Johnson (2003). Toward an Explanation of the Genesis of Ketamine-Induced Perceptual Distortions and Hallucinatory States. Brain and Mind 4 (3):307-326.
    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) channel has been proposed to function as a coincidence-detection mechanism for afferent and reentrant signals, supporting conscious perception, learning, and memory formation. In this paper we discuss the genesis of distorted perceptual states induced by subanesthetic doses of ketamine, a well-known NMDA antagonist. NMDAR blockage has been suggested to perturb perceptual processing in sensory cortex, and also to decrease GABAergic inhibition in limbic areas (leading to an increase in dopamine excitability). We propose that perceptual distortions and (...)
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  14.  12
    Linda L. Binding & Dianne M. Tapp (2008). Human Understanding in Dialogue: Gadamer's Recovery of the Genuine. Nursing Philosophy 9 (2):121-130.
  15.  29
    Douglas Tudhope & Ceri Binding (2008). Faceted Thesauri. Axiomathes 18 (2):211-222.
    The basic elements of faceted thesauri are described, together with a review of their origins and some prominent examples. Their use in browsing and searching applications is discussed. Faceted thesauri are distinguished from faceted classification schemes, while acknowledging the close similarities. The paper concludes by comparing faceted thesauri and related knowledge organization systems to ontologies and discussing appropriate areas of use.
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  16. Mihnea Capraru, Choosing Short: An Explanation of the Similarities and Dissimilarities in the Distribution Patterns of Binding and Covaluation.
    Covaluation is the generalization of coreference introduced by Tanya Reinhart. Covaluation distributes in patterns that are very similar yet not entirely identical to those of binding. On a widespread view, covaluation and binding distribute similarly because binding is defined in terms of covaluation. Yet on Reinhart's view, binding and covaluation are not related that way: binding pertains to syntax, covaluation does not. Naturally, the widespread view can easily explain the similarities between binding and covaluation, (...)
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  17.  55
    Noam Chomsky (1981). Lectures on Government and Binding. Foris.
    A more extensive discussion of certain of the more technical notions appears in my paper "On Binding" (Chomsky,; henceforth, OB). ...
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  18. Christopher J. G. Meacham (2010). Binding and its Consequences. Philosophical Studies 149 (1):49-71.
    In “Bayesianism, Infinite Decisions, and Binding”, Arntzenius et al. (Mind 113:251–283, 2004 ) present cases in which agents who cannot bind themselves are driven by standard decision theory to choose sequences of actions with disastrous consequences. They defend standard decision theory by arguing that if a decision rule leads agents to disaster only when they cannot bind themselves, this should not be taken to be a mark against the decision rule. I show that this claim has surprising implications for (...)
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  19.  3
    Jean-Rémy Martin (2013). Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such deficits may, in addition, lead to an aberrant (...)
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  20.  4
    Piers D. L. Howe & Adam Ferguson (2015). The Identity‐Location Binding Problem. Cognitive Science 39 (7):1622-1645.
    The binding problem is fundamental to visual perception. It is the problem of associating an object's visual properties with itself and not with some other object. The problem is made particular difficult because different properties of an object, such as its color, shape, size, and motion, are often processed independently, sometimes in different cortical areas. The results of these separate analyses have to be combined before the object can be seen as a single coherent entity as opposed to a (...)
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  21.  40
    Casey O'Callaghan (2014). Intermodal Binding Awareness. In David J. Bennett & Christopher S. Hill (eds.), Sensory Integration and the Unity of Consciousness. MIT 73-103.
    It is tempting to hold that perceptual experience amounts to a co-conscious collection of visual, auditory, tactual, gustatory, and olfactory episodes. If so, each aspect of perceptual experience on each occasion is associated with a specific modality. This paper, however, concerns a core variety of multimodal perceptual experience. It argues that there is perceptually apparent intermodal feature binding. I present the case for this claim, explain its consequences for theorizing about perceptual experience, and defend it against objections. I maintain (...)
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  22.  1
    Franco Giorgi, Luis Emilio Bruni & Roberto Maggio (2010). Receptor Oligomerization as a Process Modulating Cellular Semiotics. Biosemiotics 3 (2):157-176.
    The majority of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) self-assemble in the form dimeric/oligomeric complexes along the plasma membrane. Due to the molecular interactions they participate, GPCRs can potentially provide the framework for discriminating a wide variety of intercellular signals, as based on some kind of combinatorial receptor codes. GPCRs can in fact transduce signals from the external milieu by modifying the activity of such intracellular proteins as adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases and ion channels via interactions with specific G-proteins. However, in spite of (...)
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  23.  9
    J. Corcoran & John Herring (1971). Notes on a Semantic Analysis of Variable Binding Term Operators. Logique Et Analyse 55:644-657.
    -/- A variable binding term operator (vbto) is a non-logical constant, say v, which combines with a variable y and a formula F containing y free to form a term (vy:F) whose free variables are exact ly those of F, excluding y. -/- Kalish-Montague proposed using vbtos to formalize definite descriptions, set abstracts {x: F}, minimalization in recursive function theory, etc. However, they gave no sematics for vbtos. Hatcher gave a semantics but one that has flaws. We give a (...)
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  24.  13
    Antti Revonsuo & K. Tarkko (2002). Binding in Dreams: The Bizarreness of Dream Images and the Unity of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (7):3-24.
    Binding can be described at three different levels: In neuroscience it refers to the integration of single-cell activities to form functional neural assemblies, especially in response to global stimulus properties; in cognitive science it refers to the integration of distributed modular input processing to form unified representations for memory and action, and in consciousness studies it refers to the unity of phenomenal consciousness . To describe and explain the unity of consciousness, detailed phenomenological descriptions of binding at the (...)
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  25.  10
    Dan Zeman (2015). Relativism and Bound Predicates of Personal Taste: An Answer to Schaffer's Argument From Binding. Dialectica 69 (2):155-183.
    In this paper I put forward and substantiate a possible defensive move on behalf of the relativist about predicates of personal taste that can be used to block a recent contextualist argument raised against the view: the ‘argument from binding’ proposed in Schaffer (). The move consists in adopting Recanati's “variadic functions” apparatus and applying it to predicates of personal taste like ‘tasty’ and experiencer phrases like ‘for John’. I substantiate the account in (...)
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  26.  45
    Eric LaRock (2007). Disambiguation, Binding, and the Unity of Visual Consciousness. Theory and Psychology 17 (6):747-77.
    Recent findings in neuroscience strongly suggest that an object’s features (e.g., its color, texture, shape, etc.) are represented in separate areas of the visual cortex. Although represented in separate neuronal areas, somehow the feature representations are brought together as a single, unified object of visual consciousness. This raises a question of binding: how do neural activities in separate areas of the visual cortex function to produce a feature-unified object of visual consciousness? Several prominent neuroscientists have adopted neural synchrony and (...)
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  27.  16
    Christine A. Skarda (1999). The Perceptual Form of Life. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):11-12.
    To view organismic functioning in terms of integration is a mistake, although the concept has dominated scientific thinking this century. The operative concept for interpreting the organism proposed here is that of ‘articulation’ or decomposition rather than that of composition from segregated parts. It is asserted that holism is the fundamental state of all phenomena, including organisms. The impact of this changed perspective on perceptual theorizing is profound. Rather than viewing it as a process resulting from internal integration of isolated (...)
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  28.  23
    Korbinian Moeller, Elise Klein & Hans-Christoph Nuerk (2013). Influences of Cognitive Control on Numerical Cognition—Adaptation by Binding for Implicit Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (2):335-353.
    Recently, an associative learning account of cognitive control has been suggested (Verguts & Notebaert, 2009). In this so-called adaptation by binding theory, Hebbian learning of stimulus–stimulus and stimulus–response associations is assumed to drive the adaptation of human behavior. In this study, we evaluated the validity of the adaptation-by-binding account for the case of implicit learning of regularities within a stimulus set (i.e., the frequency of specific unit digit combinations in a two-digit number magnitude comparison task) and their association (...)
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  29. Dimitria Electra Gatzia & Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Psilocybin, LSD, Mescaline and Drug-Induced Synesthesia. In Victor R. Preedy (ed.), The Neuropathology Of Drug Addictions And Substance Misuse. Elsevier
    Studies have shown that both serotonin and glutamate receptor systems play a crucial role in the mechanisms underlying drug-induced synesthesia. The specific nature of these mechanisms, however, continues to remain elusive. Here we propose two distinct hypotheses for how synesthesia triggered by hallucinogens in the serotonin-agonist family may occur. One hypothesis is that the drug-induced destabilization of thalamic projections via GABAergic neuronal circuits from sensory areas leads to a disruption of low-level, spontaneous integration of multisensory stimuli. This sort of integration (...)
     
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  30.  27
    Peter Pagin & Dag Westerståhl (1993). Predicate Logic with Flexibly Binding Operators and Natural Language Semantics. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 2 (2):89-128.
    A new formalism for predicate logic is introduced, with a non-standard method of binding variables, which allows a compositional formalization of certain anaphoric constructions, including donkey sentences and cross-sentential anaphora. A proof system in natural deduction format is provided, and the formalism is compared with other accounts of this type of anaphora, in particular Dynamic Predicate Logic.
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  31.  59
    Jonathan Cohen & Samuel C. Rickless (2007). Binding Arguments and Hidden Variables. Analysis 67 (1):65–71.
    o (2000), 243). In particular, the idea is that binding interactions between the relevant expressions and natural lan- guage quantifiers are best explained by the hypothesis that those expressions harbor hidden but bindable variables. Recently, however, Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore have rejected such binding arguments for the presence of hid- den variables on the grounds that they overgeneralize — that, if sound, such arguments would establish the presence of hidden variables in all sorts of ex- pressions where (...)
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  32.  71
    L. Shastri & V. Ajjanagadde (1993). From Simple Associations to Systematic Reasoning: A Connectionist Representation of Rules, Variables, and Dynamic Binding Using Temporal Synchrony. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):417-51.
    Human agents draw a variety of inferences effortlessly, spontaneously, and with remarkable efficiency – as though these inferences were a reflexive response of their cognitive apparatus. Furthermore, these inferences are drawn with reference to a large body of background knowledge. This remarkable human ability seems paradoxical given the complexity of reasoning reported by researchers in artificial intelligence. It also poses a challenge for cognitive science and computational neuroscience: How can a system of simple and slow neuronlike elements represent a (...)
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  33.  88
    Paul Thagard & Terrence C. Stewart (2011). The AHA! Experience: Creativity Through Emergent Binding in Neural Networks. Cognitive Science 35 (1):1-33.
    Many kinds of creativity result from combination of mental representations. This paper provides a computational account of how creative thinking can arise from combining neural patterns into ones that are potentially novel and useful. We defend the hypothesis that such combinations arise from mechanisms that bind together neural activity by a process of convolution, a mathematical operation that interweaves structures. We describe computer simulations that show the feasibility of using convolution to produce emergent patterns of neural activity that can support (...)
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  34. Anna Szabolcsi (2003). Binding On the Fly: Cross-Sentential Anaphora in Variable— Free Semantics. In R. Oehrle & J. Kruijff (eds.), Resource Sensitivity, Binding, and Anaphora. Kluwer 215--227.
    Combinatory logic (Curry and Feys 1958) is a “variable-free” alternative to the lambda calculus. The two have the same expressive power but build their expressions differently. “Variable-free” semantics is, more precisely, “free of variable binding”: it has no operation like abstraction that turns a free variable into a bound one; it uses combinators—operations on functions—instead. For the general linguistic motivation of this approach, see the works of Steedman, Szabolcsi, and Jacobson, among others. The standard view (...)
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  35.  3
    Colin W. Ward & Michael C. Lawrence (2009). Ligand‐Induced Activation of the Insulin Receptor: A Multi‐Step Process Involving Structural Changes in Both the Ligand and the Receptor. Bioessays 31 (4):422-434.
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  36. Edward P. Stabler (1992). The Logical Approach to Syntax Foundations, Specifications, and Implementations of Theories of Government and Binding. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  37.  94
    Anna Szabolcsi (1990). Across-the-Board Binding Meets Verb Second. In M. Nespor & J. Mascaro (eds.), Grammar in progress. Foris
    Right-node raising of anaphors and bound pronouns out of coordinations, as in "Every student likes, and every professor hates, himself / his neighbors" is judged more acceptable in German and Dutch than in English. Using combinatory categorial grammar, this paper ties the cross-linguistic difference to the fact that German and Dutch are V-2 languages, and V-2 necessitates a lifted category for verbs that automatically caters to the right-node raised duplicator. The same lifted category is optionally available in English, but it (...)
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  38.  33
    Casey O'Callaghan (2014). Audible Independence and Binding. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer Studies in Brain and Mind
  39.  5
    Syed Hasan Arif (2009). A Ca2+‐Binding Protein with Numerous Roles and Uses: Parvalbumin in Molecular Biology and Physiology. Bioessays 31 (4):410-421.
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  40.  1
    T. S. Wong, R. Ho & J. Ho (1974). Influence of Shape of Receptor Organ on the Horizontal-Vertical Illusion in Passive Touch. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):414.
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  41. Zvi Penner (1988). The Grammar of the Nominal Sentence: A Government-Binding Approach. Universitaet Bern, Institut Für Sprachwissenschaft.
  42.  25
    James W. Moore & Sukhvinder S. Obhi (2012). Intentional Binding and the Sense of Agency: A Review. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):546-561.
    It is nearly 10 years since Patrick Haggard and colleagues first reported the ‘intentional binding’ effect . The intentional binding effect refers to the subjective compression of the temporal interval between a voluntary action and its external sensory consequence. Since the first report, considerable interest has been generated and a fascinating array of studies has accumulated. Much of the interest in intentional binding comes from the promise to shed light on human agency. In this review (...)
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  43. Martin Jean-Rémy (2013). Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such (...)
     
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  44. Frank Arntzenius, Adam Elga & John Hawthorne (2004). Bayesianism, Infinite Decisions, and Binding. Mind 113 (450):251 - 283.
    We pose and resolve several vexing decision theoretic puzzles. Some are variants of existing puzzles, such as 'Trumped' (Arntzenius and McCarthy 1997), 'Rouble trouble' (Arntzenius and Barrett 1999), 'The airtight Dutch book' (McGee 1999), and 'The two envelopes puzzle' (Broome 1995). Others are new. A unified resolution of the puzzles shows that Dutch book arguments have no force in infinite cases. It thereby provides evidence that reasonable utility functions may be unbounded and that reasonable credence functions need not be countably (...)
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  45.  83
    Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (2001). Temporal Binding and the Neural Correlates of Sensory Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):16-25.
    Theories of binding have recently come into the focus of the consciousness debate. In this review, we discuss the potential relevance of temporal binding mechanisms for sensory awareness. Specifically, we suggest that neural synchrony with a precision in the millisecond range may be crucial for conscious processing, and may be involved in arousal, perceptual integration, attentional selection and working memory. Recent evidence from both animal and human studies demonstrates that specific changes in neuronal synchrony occur during all of (...)
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  46.  59
    Andreas K. Engel, P. Fries, P. Kreiter Konig, M. Brecht & Wolf Singer (1999). Temporal Binding, Binocular Rivalry, and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (2):128-51.
    Cognitive functions like perception, memory, language, or consciousness are based on highly parallel and distributed information processing by the brain. One of the major unresolved questions is how information can be integrated and how coherent representational states can be established in the distributed neuronal systems subserving these functions. It has been suggested that this so-called ''binding problem'' may be solved in the temporal domain. The hypothesis is that synchronization of neuronal discharges can serve for the integration of distributed neurons (...)
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  47. Antti Revonsuo (1999). Binding and the Phenomenal Unity of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (2):173-85.
    The binding problem is frequently discussed in consciousness research. However, it is by no means clear what the problem is supposed to be and how exactly it relates to consciousness. In the present paper the nature of the binding problem is clarified by distinguishing between different formulations of the problem. Some of them make no mention of consciousness, whereas others are directly related to aspects of phenomenal experience. Certain formulations of the binding problem are closely connected to (...)
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  48.  14
    K. Engbert & A. WohlschlAger (2007). Intentions and Expectations in Temporal Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):255-264.
    Recently, it has been shown that the perceived times of voluntary movements and their effects are perceived as shifted towards each other. This temporal binding phenomenon was explained by an integrated representation of movement and effect, facilitating operant learning and the experience of intentionality. Here, we investigated whether temporal binding depends on explicit intentional attributions. In Experiment 1, participants intended to either produce or avoid producing an effect by the timing of their movements, with the ratio of success (...)
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  49. Arnim von Stechow, Binding by Verbs: Tense, Person and Mood Under Attitudes.
    .................................................................................................... ..................... 2 2 LF-Binding and Feature Deletion......................................................................................... 3..
     
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  50.  15
    Myrthel Dogge, Marloes Schaap, Ruud Custers, Daniel M. Wegner & Henk Aarts (2012). When Moving Without Volition: Implied Self-Causation Enhances Binding Strength Between Involuntary Actions and Effects. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):501-506.
    The conscious awareness of voluntary action is associated with systematic changes in time perception: The interval between actions and outcomes is experienced as compressed in time. Although this temporal binding is thought to result from voluntary movement and provides a window to the sense of agency, recent studies challenge this idea by demonstrating binding in involuntary movement. We offer a potential account for these findings by proposing that binding between involuntary actions and effects can occur when self-causation (...)
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