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Denis G. Arnold [28]Denis Gordon Arnold [2]
  1. Denis G. Arnold (2013). Global Justice and International Business. Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):125-143.
    Little theoretical attention has been paid to the question of what obligations corporations and other business enterprises have to the four billion people living at the base of the global economic pyramid. This article makes several theoretical contributions to this topic. First, it is argued that corporations are properly understood as agents of global justice. Second, the legitimacy of global governance institutions and the legitimacy of corporations and other business enterprises are distinguished. Third, it is argued that a deliberative democracy (...)
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  2. Denis G. Arnold (2012). Business Ethics Quarterly Report. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 23 (2):6-6.
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  3. Wesley Cragg, Denis G. Arnold & Peter Muchlinski (2012). Guest Editors' Introduction. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):1-7.
    We provide a brief history of the business and human rights discourse and scholarship, and an overview of the articles included in the special issue.
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  4. Wesley Cragg, Denis G. Arnold & Peter Muchlinski (2012). Human Rights and Business. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):1-7.
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  5. Denis G. Arnold (2010). Transnational Corporations and the Duty to Respect Basic Human Rights. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):371-399.
    In a series of reports the United Nations Special Representative on the issue of Human Rights and Transnational Corporations has emphasized a tripartite framework regarding business and human rights that includes the state “duty to protect,” the TNC “responsibility to respect,” and “appropriate remedies” for human rights violations. This article examines the recent history of UN initiatives regarding business and human rights and places the tripartite framework in historical context. Three approaches to human rights are distinguished: moral, political, and legal. (...)
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  6. Denis G. Arnold (2010). Working Conditions : Safety and Sweatshops. In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  7. Denis G. Arnold, Robert Audi & Matt Zwolinski (2010). New Directions for Business Ethics Research Business Ethics Quarterly Twentieth Anniversary Forum, Part II: Recent Work in Ethical Theory and its Implications for Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):559.
     
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  8. Denis G. Arnold (2009). The Ethics of Direct to Consumer Advertising. In Denis Gordon Arnold (ed.), Ethics and the Business of Biomedicine. Cambridge University Press. 131--49.
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  9. Denis Gordon Arnold (ed.) (2009). Ethics and the Business of Biomedicine. Cambridge University Press.
    During the last thirty years we have witnessed sweeping changes in health care worldwide, including new and expensive biomedical technologies, an increasingly powerful and influential pharmaceutical industry, steadily increasing health care costs in industrialised nations, and new threats to medical professionalism. The essays collected in this book concern costs and profits in relation to just health care, the often controversial practices of pharmaceutical companies, and corruption in the professional practice of medicine. Leading experts discuss justice in relation to business-friendly strategies (...)
     
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  10. Tom L. Beauchamp, Norman E. Bowie & Denis Gordon Arnold (eds.) (2008). Ethical Theory and Business. Pearson/Prentice Hall.
     
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  11. Jeffery D. Smith, Denis G. Arnold, Mitchell R. Haney, Nien-hê Hsieh, Alexei Marcoux, Christopher Michaelson, Geoff Moore, Jeffrey Moriarty, Jeffery Smith & Ben Wempe (2008). Normative Theory and Business Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  12. Denis G. Arnold (2007). Review of Stuart P. Green, Lying, Cheating, and Stealing: A Moral Theory of White-Collar Crime. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (9).
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  13. Denis G. Arnold & Norman E. Bowie (2007). Respect for Workers in Global Supply Chains: Advancing the Debate Over Sweatshops. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1).
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  14. Denis G. Arnold (2006). Corporate Moral Agency. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):279–291.
    "The main conclusion of this essay is that it is plausible to conclude that corporations are capable of exhibiting intentionality, and as a result that they may be properly understood as moral agents" (p. 281).
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  15. Denis G. Arnold (2005). Review of Dennis F. Thompson, Restoring Responsibility: Ethics in Government, Business, and Healthcare. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (7).
  16. Denis G. Arnold & Keith Bustos (2005). Business, Ethics, and Global Climate Change. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (1/2):103-130.
    After providing a brief history of global climate change, we consider and reject the influential position that free markets and responsive democracies relieve corporations of obligations to protect the environment. Five main objections to the free market view are presented, focusing in particular on the roles of business organizations in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. Ethically grounded management and public policy recommendations are offered.
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  17. Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman (2005). Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices. Business Ethics 14 (3):206–222.
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  18. Denis G. Arnold (2003). Exploitation and the Sweatshop Quandary. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):243-256.
  19. Denis G. Arnold (2003). Liberty in Cyberspace. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):573-580.
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  20. Denis G. Arnold (2003). Libertarian Theories of the Corporate and Global Capitalism. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (2):155-173.
    Libertarian theories of the normative core of the corporation hold in common the view that is the responsibility of publicity held corporations to return profits to shareholders within the bounds of certain moral side-constraints. Side-constraints may be either weak (grounded in the rules of the game) or strong (grounded in rights). This essay considers libertarian arguments regarding the normative core of the corporation in the context of global capitalism and in the light of actual corporate behavior. First, it is argued (...)
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  21. Denis G. Arnold (2003). Patrick Maclagan, Management and Morality: A Developmental Perspective. Teaching Business Ethics 7 (2):179-181.
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  22. Denis G. Arnold & Norman E. Bowie (2003). Sweatshops and Respect for Persons. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):221-242.
    This article applies the Kantian doctrine of respect for persons to the problem of sweatshops. We argue that multinational enterprises are properly regarded as responsible for the practices of their subcontractors and suppliers. We then argue that multinational enterprises have the following duties in their offshore manufacturing facilities: to ensure that local labor laws are followed; to refrain from coercion; to meet minimum safety standards; and to provide a living wage for employees. Finally, we consider and reply to the objection (...)
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  23. Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman (2003). Moral Imagination and the Future of Sweatshops. Business and Society Review 108 (4):425-461.
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  24. Denis G. Arnold (2001). Coercion and Moral Responsibility. American Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):53 - 67.
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  25. Denis G. Arnold (1998). Bernard Berofsky, Liberation From the Self: A Theory of Personal Autonomy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995, Pp. 270. [REVIEW] Utilitas 10 (3):368-.
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  26. Denis G. Arnold & Paul T. Menzel (1998). When Comes “The End of the Day?”: A Comment on the Dialogue Between Dax Cowart and Robert Burt. Hastings Center Report 28 (1):25-27.
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  27. Denis G. Arnold (1997). Introspection and its Objects. Journal of Philosophical Research 22 (April):87-94.
    Traditionally conceived, introspection is a form of nonsensuous perception that allows the mind to scrutinize at least some of its own states while it is experiencing them. The traditional account of introspection has been in disrepute ever since Ryle argued that the very idea of introspection is a logical muddle. Recent critics such as William Lyons, John Searle, and Sydney Shoemaker argue that this disrepute is well-deserved. Three distinct objections to the traditional account of introspection are considered and rejected. It (...)
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  28. Denis G. Arnold (1995). Hume on the Moral Difference Between Humans and Other Animals. History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (3):303 - 316.
    The primary concern of this paper is Hume's account of the moral difference between humans and other animals. In order to clarify this difference Hume's views regarding reason, sympathy, and human sentiment are examined. The purpose of this investigation is threefold. First, Hume's position on the moral difference between humans and other animals is clarified. It is argued that this difference is properly traced to Hume's account of the sentiment of humanity. Second, Hume is defended against the claim that his (...)
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  29. Denis G. Arnold (1992). Biology, Ethics and Animals. Teaching Philosophy 15 (4):393-395.
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