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Siblings:History/traditions: Global Justice
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  1. - -- (2013). ASAP, Academics Stand Against Poverty. Dilemata 13.
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  2. Arash Abizadeh (2013). A Critique of the “Common Ownership of the Earth” Thesis. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 8 (2):33-40.
    In On Global Justice, Mathias Risse claims that the earth’s original resources are collectively owned by all human beings in common, such that each individual has a moral right to use the original resources necessary for satisfying her basic needs. He also rejects the rival views that original resources are by nature owned by no one, owned by each human in equal shares, or owned and co-managed jointly by all humans. I argue that Risse’s arguments fail to establish a form (...)
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  3. Arash Abizadeh (2007). Cooperation, Pervasive Impact, and Coercion: On the Scope (Not Site) of Distributive Justice. Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (4):318–358.
    Many anticosmopolitan Rawlsians argue that since the primary subject of justice is society's basic structure, and since there is no global basic structure, the scope of justice is domestic. This paper challenges the anticosmopolitan basic structure argument by distinguishing three interpretations of what Rawls meant by the basic structure and its relation to justice, corresponding to the cooperation (Freeman), pervasive impact (Buchanan), and coercion (Blake, Nagel) theories of distributive justice. On the cooperation theory, it is true that there is no (...)
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  4. Arash Abizadeh & Pablo Gilabert (2008). Is There a Genuine Tension Between Cosmopolitan Egalitarianism and Special Responsibilities? Philosophical Studies 138 (3):349 - 365.
    Samuel Scheffler has recently argued that some relationships are non-instrumentally valuable; that such relationships give rise to “underived” special responsibilities; that there is a genuine tension between cosmopolitan egalitarianism and special responsibilities; and that we must consequently strike a balance between the two. We argue that there is no such tension and propose an alternative approach to the relation between cosmopolitan egalitarianism and special responsibilities. First, while some relationships are non-instrumentally valuable, no relationship is unconditionally valuable. Second, whether such relationships (...)
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  5. Evental Aesthetics (2014). Poverty and Asceticism (Vol. 2 No. 4,2014). Evental Aesthetics 2 (4):1-107.
    This issue profiles various attempts, both successful and fraught, to engage the divide between asceticism and opulence, between materialism and poverty.
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  6. Joseph Agassi (1990). Global Responsibility. Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):217-221.
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  7. William Aiken & Hugh LaFollette (eds.) (1995). World Hunger and Morality. Prentice-Hall.
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  8. Sahar Akhtar (2009). National Responsibility and Global Justice - David Miller. Ethics and International Affairs 23 (3):308-310.
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  9. Marcelo Alegre (2007). Extreme Poverty in a Wealthy World: What Justice Demands Today. In Thomas Pogge (ed.), Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right: Who Owes What to the Very Poor? Co-Published with Unesco. OUP Oxford
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  10. Jesús Javier Alemán Alonso (2013). La responsabilidad global de las finanzas. Dos propuestas concretas de inversión socialmente responsable. Dilemata 13:153-165.
    The importance that banks have in our lives goes beyond the simple fact of being guardians of our money. The close relationship they have with political leaders affects us in every facet of life, including work, health, pensions, and social benefits in general. Being aware of this relationship warns us against the interested abuses by those who claim to represent us. Political leaders actually represent big capital. The most palpable evidence is the international refusal to ban tax havens that hide (...)
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  11. A. Altman (2013). Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account. Philosophical Review 122 (1):129-131.
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  12. Andrew Altman (2009). A Liberal Theory of International Justice. Oxford University Press.
    This book advances a novel theory of international justice that combines the orthodox liberal notion that the lives of individuals are what ultimately matter morally with the putatively antiliberal idea of an irreducibly collective right of self-governance. The individual and her rights are placed at center stage insofar as political states are judged legitimate if they adequately protect the human rights of their constituents and respect the rights of all others. Yet, the book argues that legitimate states have a moral (...)
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  13. Elmar Altvater (1998). Global Order and Nature. In Roger Keil (ed.), Political Ecology: Global and Local. Routledge 19--45.
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  14. Allen Andrew Alvarez (2013). Health Equity in a Globalised World: Towards Constraining Global Greed? Asian Bioethics Review 5 (4):316-330.
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  15. Laura Anderko (2010). Achieving Health Equity on a Global Scale Through a Community-Based, Public Health Framework for Action. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (3):486-489.
    Despite good intentions and decades of discussion addressing the need for transformative changes globally to reduce poverty and improve health equity, little progress has been made. A fundamental shift in framing the current conversation is critical to achieve “health for all,” moving away from the traditional approaches that use the more narrowly focused medical model, which is intent on treating and curing disease. A public health framework for action is needed, which recognizes and confronts the complex, and often-times difficult-to-achieve social (...)
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  16. George Andreopoulos (2010). Challenges and Opportunities in Advancing Human Protection: Rethinking the Global-Local Nexus. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):142-156.
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  17. Karl-Otto Apel (2001). Is a Political Conception of “Overlapping Consensus” an Adequate Basis for Global Justice? The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 11:1-15.
    This paper considers how the problem of justice is to be globalized in the political theory of John Rawls. I discuss first the conception of “overlapping consensus” as an innovation in Rawls’s Political Liberalism and point out the recurrence of the problem of a philosophical foundation in his pragmatico-political interpretation. I suggest an intensification of Rawls’s notion of the “priority of the right to the good” as a philosophical correction to his political self-interpretation, and then finally carry through on a (...)
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  18. Chris Armstrong (2013). Global Justice, Positional Goods, and International Political Inequality. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (2):109-116.
    In Global Justice and Avant-Garde Political Agency, Lea Ypi sets out a challenging model for theorizing global justice. Such a theory should be robustly critical*and egalitarian*rather than swallowing sour grapes by adapting its ideals to what appears to be politically possible. But it should also offer concrete prescriptions capable of guiding reform of the actual*deeply unjust*world in which we live. It should learn from concrete political struggles and from those on the receiving end of global injustice, and also deliver principles (...)
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  19. Chris Armstrong (2011). Citizenship, Egalitarianism and Global Justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (5):603-621.
    Many of the foremost defenders of distributive egalitarianism hold that its scope should be limited to co-citizens. But this bracketing of distributive equality exclusively to citizens turns out to be very difficult to defend. Pressure is placed on it, for instance, when we recognize its vulnerability to ?extension arguments? which attempt to cast the net of egalitarian concern more widely. The paper rehearses those arguments and also examines some ? ultimately unsuccessful ? responses which ?citizenship egalitarians? might make. If it (...)
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  20. Chris Armstrong (2011). Shared Understandings, Collective Autonomy, and Global Equality. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (1):51-69.
    The political theorist Michael Walzer has usually been taken as an opponent of global distributive justice, on the basis that it is incompatible with collective autonomy, would endanger cultural diversity, or simply on the basis that principles of global distributive justice cannot be coherently envisaged, given cross-cultural disagreement about the nature and value of the social goods that might be distributed. However in his recent work, Walzer demonstrates a surprising degree of sympathy for the claims of global distributive justice, even (...)
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  21. Chris Armstrong (2009). Global Egalitarianism. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):155-171.
    To whom is egalitarian justice owed? Our fellow citizens, or all of humankind? If the latter, what form might a global brand of egalitarianism take? This paper examines some recent debates about the justification, and content, of global egalitarian justice. It provides an account of some keenly argued controversies about the scope of egalitarian justice, between those who would restrict it to the level of the state and those who would extend it more widely. It also notes the cross-cutting distinction (...)
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  22. Chris Armstrong (2009). Basic Needs, Equality and Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):245 – 251.
    A review essay of Gillian Brock Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account (Oxford University Press, 2009).
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  23. Richard J. Arneson, Chapter 3: Theories, Types, and Bounds of Justice.
    What do we owe to people in other countries around the globe? What do others owe to us? What does morality require of nation states in their policies toward other nation states and toward people other than co-nationals? (On the latter, see Buchanan 2004 and Rawls 1999). These questions define the subject matter of global justice theory.
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  24. Richard J. Arneson (2005). Do Patriotic Ties Limit Global Justice Duties? Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):127 - 150.
    Some theorists who accept the existence of global justice duties to alleviate the condition of distant needy strangers hold that these duties are significantly constrained by special ties to fellow countrymen. The patriotic priority thesis holds that morality requires the members of each nation-state to give priority to helping needy fellow compatriots over more needy distant strangers. Three arguments for constraint and patriotic priority are examined in this essay: an argument from fair play, one from coercion, another from coercion and (...)
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  25. Denis G. Arnold (2013). Global Justice and International Business. Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):125-143.
    Little theoretical attention has been paid to the question of what obligations corporations and other business enterprises have to the four billion people living at the base of the global economic pyramid. This article makes several theoretical contributions to this topic. First, it is argued that corporations are properly understood as agents of global justice. Second, the legitimacy of global governance institutions and the legitimacy of corporations and other business enterprises are distinguished. Third, it is argued that a deliberative democracy (...)
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  26. Marcus Arvan (2008). A Nonideal Theory of Justice. Dissertation, University of Arizona
    This dissertation defends a “non-ideal theory” of justice: a systematic theory of how to respond justly to injustice. Chapter 1 argues that contemporary political philosophy lacks a non-ideal theory of justice, and defends a variation of John Rawls’ famous original position – the Non-Ideal Original Position – as a method with which to construct such a theory. Finally, Chapter 1 uses the Non-Ideal Original Position to argue for a Fundamental Principle of Non-Ideal Theory: a principle that requires injustices to be (...)
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  27. I. As (1999). Also Argue Elsewhere, the Argument Moves Too Quickly, and the Reference to Co-Nationals is Co-Extensive with Other Acts and Relationships That Matter Morally Anyway. See Gillian Brock,'The New Nationalisms'. The Monist 82:367-386.
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  28. Elizabeth Ashford (2009). In What Sense is the Right to Subsistence a Basic Right? Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (4):488-503.
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  29. Elizabeth Ashford (2009). The Alleged Dichotomy Between Positive and Negative Duties of Justice. In Charles R. Beitz & Robert E. Goodin (eds.), Global Basic Rights. OUP Oxford 85--115.
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  30. Veit Bader (2008). Global Justice in Complex Moral Worlds. Dilemmas of Contextualized Theories. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (4):539-552.
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  31. Veit Bader (2007). Moral Minimalism and Global Justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 10.
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  32. Veit Bader (2005). Reasonable Impartiality and Priority for Compatriots. A Criticism of Liberal Nationalism's Main Flaws. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):83 - 103.
    Distinguishing between reasonable partiality and reasonable impartiality makes a difference in resolving the serious clashes between priority for compatriots versus cosmopolitan global duties. Defenders of a priority for compatriots have to acknowledge two strong moral constraints: states have to fulfil all their special, domestic and trans-domestic duties, and associative duties are limited by distributive constraints resulting from the moral duty to fight poverty and gross global inequalities. In the recent global context, I see four main problems for liberal-nationalist defenders of (...)
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  33. Ayelet Banai (2013). Political Self-Determination and Global Egalitarianism. Social Theory and Practice 39 (1):45-69.
    Proponents of global egalitarian justice often argue that their positions are compatible with the principle of self-determination. At the same time, prominent arguments in favor of global egalitarianism object to one central component of the principle: namely, that the borders of states (or other political units) are normatively significant for the allocation of rights and duties; that duties of justice and democratic rights should stop or change at borders. In this article, I propose an argument in defense of the normative (...)
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  34. Gary Banham (2007). Cosmopolitics : Law and Right. In Diane Morgan & Gary Banham (eds.), Cosmopolitics and the Emergence of a Future. Palgrave Macmillan
    This paper assesses Jurgen Habermas' reconstruction of Kant's cosmopolitan project suggesting ways in which this reconstruction creates new problems that were not part of Kant's endeavour as well as indicating critical appreciation of the idea of the project.
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  35. Asaf Bar-Tura (2011). Economic Policy and World Organization. Perspectives on Global Development and Technology 10 (1):194-212.
    The global economic crisis and the responses to it have brought to the fore questions of sovereignty and cosmopolitanism. In a world so interlinked, what is the proper way to order the global arena, politically and economically? This essay examines Habermas’ multilayered approach to world organization, as well as Pogge and others. Focusing on the question of trade policies, I argue (contra Habermas) for robust global economic governance policies, but (contra Pogge) that these policies should uphold fair trade instead of (...)
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  36. Albino Barrera (2007). Globalization and Economic Ethics: Distributive Justice in the Knowledge Economy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    What is the appropriate criterion to use for distributive justice? Is it efficiency, need, contribution, entitlement, equality, effort, or ability? Globalization and Economic Ethics maintains that far from being rival principles of distributive justice, efficiency and need satisfaction are, in fact, complementary norms in our emerging knowledge economy. After all, human capital plays the central role in effecting and sustaining long-term efficiency in the Digital Age. This book explores the vital link between human capital formation and allocative efficiency using the (...)
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  37. Brian Barry (1995). Spherical Justice and Global Injustice. In David Miller & Michael Walzer (eds.), Pluralism, Justice, and Equality. OUP Oxford 74.
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  38. Christian Barry (2014). The Regulation of Harm in International Trade: A Critique of James's Collective Due Care Principle. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):255-263.
    In his important recent book, Aaron James has defended a principle ? Collective Due Care ? for determining when a form of economic integration is morally objectionable because it causes unjustified harm (including unemployment, wage suppression and diminished working conditions). This essay argues that Collective Due Care would yield implausible judgements about trade practices and would be too indeterminate to play the practical role for which it is intended.
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  39. Christian Barry (2014). Review of Mathias Risse, On Global Justice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 5.
  40. Christian Barry (2011). Immigration and Global Justice. Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric 4 (1):30-38.
  41. Christian Barry, Redistribution. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  42. Christian Barry (2006). Is Global Institutional Reform a False Promise? Cornell International Law Journal 39 (3):523-536.
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  43. Christian Barry & Luara Ferracioli (forthcoming). Can Withdrawing Citizenship Be Justified? Political Studies.
    When can or should citizenship be granted to prospective members of states? When can or should states withdraw citizenship from their existing members? In recent decades, political philosophers have paid considerable attention to the first question, but have generally neglected the second. There are of course good practical reasons for prioritizing the question of when citizenship should be granted—many individuals have a strong interest in acquiring citizenship in particular political communities, while many fewer are at risk of denationalization. Still, loss (...)
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  44. Christian Barry & Luara Ferracioli (2013). Young on Responsibility and Structural Injustice. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (3):247-257.
    Our aim in this essay is to critically examine Iris Young’s arguments in her important posthumously published book against what she calls the liability model for attributing responsibility, as well as the arguments that she marshals in support of what she calls the social connection model of political responsibility. We contend that her arguments against the liability model of conceiving responsibility are not convincing, and that her alternative to it is vulnerable to damaging objections.
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  45. Christian Barry & Pablo Gilabert (2008). Does Global Egalitarianism Provide an Impractical and Unattractive Ideal of Justice? International Affairs 84 (5):1025-1039.
    In his important new book National responsibility and global justice, David Miller presents a systematic challenge to existing theories of global justice. In particular, he argues that cosmopolitan egalitarianism must be rejected. Such views, Miller maintains, would place unacceptable burdens on the most productive political communities, undermine national self-determination, and disincentivize political communities from taking responsibility for their fate. They are also impracticable and quite unrealistic, at least under present conditions. Miller offers an alternative account that conceives global justice in (...)
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  46. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Introduction. In Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.), Global Justice. Ashgate
    This volume brings together a range of influential essays by distinguished philosophers and political theorists on the issue of global justice. Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. The volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions such as the applicability of the ideals of social and economic equality to the (...)
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  47. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.) (2012). Global Justice. Ashgate.
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  48. Christian Barry & Kate Macdonald (forthcoming). How Should We Conceive of Individual Consumer Responsibility to Address Labour Injustices? In Yossi Dahan, Hanna Lerner & Faina Milman-Sivan (eds.), Global Justice and International Labour Rights. Cambridge University Press
    Many approaches to addressing labour injustices—shortfalls from minimally decent wages and working conditions— focus on how governments should orient themselves toward other states in which such phenomena take place, or to the firms that are involved with such practices. But of course the question of how to regard such labour practices must also be faced by individuals, and individual consumers of the goods that are produced through these practices in particular. Consumers have become increasingly aware of their connections to complex (...)
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  49. Christian Barry & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2005). Global Institutions and Responsibilities: Achieving Global Justice. Blackwell.
    This book helps readers identify feasible and morally plausible reforms of global institutional arrangements and international organizations.
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  50. Christian Barry & Sanjay Reddy (2008). International Trade and Labor Standards:A Proposal for Linkage. Columbia University Press.
    In this book, Christian Barry and Sanjay G. Reddy propose ways in which the international trading system can support poor countries in promoting the well-being of their peoples.
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