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Leigh Turner [27]Leigh G. Turner [1]
  1. Leigh Turner (2013). Transnational Medical Travel. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (2):170-180.
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  2. Leigh Turner (2012). News Media Reports of Patient Deaths Following 'Medical Tourism' for Cosmetic Surgery and Bariatric Surgery. Developing World Bioethics 12 (1):21-34.
    Contemporary scholarship examining clinical outcomes in medical travel for cosmetic surgery identifies cases in which patients traveled abroad for medical procedures and subsequently returned home with infections and other surgical complications. Though there are peer-reviewed articles identifying patient deaths in cases where patients traveled abroad for commercial kidney transplantation or stem cell injections, no scholarly publications document deaths of patients who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Drawing upon news media reports extending from 1993 to 2011, this article (...)
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  3. Jeremy Snyder, Valorie Crooks & Leigh Turner (2011). Issues and Challenges in Research on the Ethics of Medical Tourism: Reflections From a Conference. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):3-6.
    The authors co-organized (Snyder and Crooks) and gave a keynote presentation at (Turner) a conference on ethical issues in medical tourism. Medical tourism involves travel across international borders with the intention of receiving medical care. This care is typically paid for out-of-pocket and is motivated by an interest in cost savings and/or avoiding wait times for care in the patient’s home country. This practice raises numerous ethical concerns, including potentially exacerbating health inequities in destination and source countries and disrupting continuity (...)
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  4. Leigh G. Turner (2010). The English Surgeon – Directed and Produced by Geoffrey Smith. Developing World Bioethics 10 (3):173-174.
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  5. Leigh Turner (2009). Commercial Organ Transplantation in the Philippines. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (02):192-.
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  6. Leigh Turner (2009). Anthropological and Sociological Critiques of Bioethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):83-98.
    Anthropologists and sociologists offer numerous critiques of bioethics. Social scientists criticize bioethicists for their arm-chair philosophizing and socially ungrounded pontificating, offering philosophical abstractions in response to particular instances of suffering, making all-encompassing universalistic claims that fail to acknowledge cultural differences, fostering individualism and neglecting the importance of families and communities, and insinuating themselves within the “belly” of biomedicine. Although numerous aspects of bioethics warrant critique and reform, all too frequently social scientists offer ungrounded, exaggerated criticisms of bioethics. Anthropological and sociological (...)
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  7. Leigh Turner (2008). Bioethics and Social Studies of Medicine: Overlapping Concerns. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (01):36-.
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  8. Leigh Turner (2008). Politics, Bioethics, and Science Policy. HEC Forum 20 (1):29-47.
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  9. Leigh Turner (2007). Global Health Inequalities and Bioethics. In Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Felicia Cohn (eds.), The Ethics of Bioethics: Mapping the Moral Landscape. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  10. Wendy Austin, Gillian Lemermeyer, Miriam Brouillet & Leigh Turner (2005). Anderson-Shaw, Lisa, Meadow, William with Policy? HEC Forum 17 (4):327-329.
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  11. Miriam Brouillet & Leigh Turner (2005). Bioethics, Religion, and Democratic Deliberation: Policy Formation and Embryonic Stem Cell Research. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):49-63.
  12. Leigh Turner (2005). Bioethics, Social Class, and the Sociological Imagination. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (4):374-378.
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  13. Leigh Turner (2005). From the Local to the Global: Bioethics and the Concept of Culture. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (3):305 – 320.
    Cultural models of health, illness, and moral reasoning are receiving increasing attention in bioethics scholarship. Drawing upon research tools from medical and cultural anthropology, numerous researchers explore cultural variations in attitudes toward truth telling, informed consent, pain relief, and planning for end-of-life care. However, culture should not simply be equated with ethnicity. Rather, the concept of culture can serve as an heuristic device at various levels of analysis. In addition to considering how participation in particular ethnic groups and religious traditions (...)
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  14. Leigh Turner (2005). Public Goods, Private Goods. Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (1):131-137.
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  15. Leigh Turner (2004). Bioethics in Pluralistic Societies. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):201-208.
    Contemporary liberal democracies contain multiple cultural, religious, and philosophical traditions. Within these societies, different interpretive communities provide divergent models for understanding health, illness, and moral obligations. Bioethicists commonly draw upon models of moral reasoning that presume the existence of shared moral intuitions. Principlist bioethics, case-based models of moral deliberation, intuitionist frameworks, and cost-benefit analyses all emphasise the uniformity of moral reasoning. However, religious and cultural differences challenge assumptions about common modes of moral deliberation. Too often, bioethicists minimize or ignore the (...)
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  16. Leigh Turner (2004). Life Extension Research: Health, Illness, and Death. Health Care Analysis 12 (2):117-129.
    Scientists, bioethicists, and policy makers are currently engaged in a contentious debate about the scientific prospects and morality of efforts to increase human longevity. Some demographers and geneticists suggest that there is little reason to think that it will be possible to significantly extend the human lifespan. Other biodemographers and geneticists argue that there might well be increases in both life expectancy and lifespan. Bioethicists and policy makers are currently addressing many of the ethical, social, and economic issues raised by (...)
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  17. Leigh Turner (2004). Republicanism. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (2):273-279.
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  18. Leigh Turner (2004). The Bioethics Myth. The Philosophers' Magazine 26 (26):23-25.
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  19. Leigh Turner (2003). Bioethics and Religions: Religious Traditions and Understandings of Morality, Health, and Illness. Health Care Analysis 11 (3):181-197.
    For many individuals, religious traditions provide important resources for moral deliberation. While contemporary philosophical approaches in bioethics draw upon secular presumptions, religion continues to play an important role in both personal moral reasoning and public debate. In this analysis, I consider the connections between religious traditions and understandings of morality, medicine, illness, suffering, and the body. The discussion is not intended to provide a theological analysis within the intellectual constraints of a particular religious tradition. Rather, I offer an interpretive analysis (...)
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  20. Leigh Turner (2003). Bioethics and Anthropology: Bridges and Barriers to Transdisciplinary Research. Monash Bioethics Review 22 (3):12-17.
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  21. Leigh Turner (2003). Bioethics in a Multicultural World: Medicine and Morality in Pluralistic Settings. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 11 (2):99-117.
    Current approaches in bioethics largely overlook the multicultural social environment within which most contemporary ethical issues unfold. For example, principlists argue that the common morality of society supports four basic ethical principles. These principles, and the common morality more generally, are supposed to be a matter of shared common sense. Defenders of case-based approaches to moral reasoning similarly assume that moral reasoning proceeds on the basis of common moral intuitions. Both of these approaches fail to recognize the existence of multiple (...)
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  22. Leigh Turner (2003). Doffing the Mask: Why Manuscript Reviewers Ought to Be Identifiable. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (1):41-48.
  23. Leigh Turner (2003). Life Extension Technologies: Economic, Psychological, and Social Considerations. HEC Forum 15 (3):258-273.
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  24. Leigh Turner (2003). Promoting F.A.I.T.H. In Peer Review: Five Core Attributes of Effective Peer Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):181-188.
    Peer review is an important component of scholarly research. Long a black box whose practical mechanisms were unknown to researchers and readers, peer review is increasingly facing demands for accountability and improvement. Numerous studies address empirical aspects of the peer review process. Much less consideration is typically given to normative dimensions of peer review. This paper considers what authors, editors, reviewers, and readers ought to expect from the peer review process. Integrity in the review process is vital if various parties (...)
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  25. Leigh Turner (2003). Zones of Consensus and Zones of Conflict: Questioning the "Common Morality" Presumption in Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (3):193-218.
    : Many bioethicists assume that morality is in a state of wide reflective equilibrium. According to this model of moral deliberation, public policymaking can build upon a core common morality that is pretheoretical and provides a basis for practical reasoning. Proponents of the common morality approach to moral deliberation make three assumptions that deserve to be viewed with skepticism. First, they commonly assume that there is a universal, transhistorical common morality that can serve as a normative baseline for judging various (...)
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  26. Leigh Turner (1998). The Greening of Bioethics: Corporate Funding of Bioethics Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (03):326-328.
    Bioethicists recognize the conflicts of interest that can arise for clinicians and scientists. However, few scholars exploring the moral dimensions of medicine and the sciences publicly address potential conflicts of interest concerning their own research. Increasingly, however, bioethicists will be confronted with difficult choices in which opportunities to obtain funding will sometimes conflict with the pursuit of critical, rigorous scholarship conducted without regard for corporate interests.
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  27. Eve DeVaro & Leigh Turner (1997). Research Notes. Hastings Center Report 27 (1):48-48.
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  28. Leigh Turner (1997). Bioethics, Public Health, and Firearm-Related Violence: Missing Links Between Bioethics and Public Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):42-48.
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