Bookmark and Share

Stem Cell Research

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
Related categories
Siblings:
331 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 331
  1. Charol Abrams (2008). Bias and Censorship in the AMWA Journal: Lack of Balance in Reporting on Embryonic Stem Cell Research. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (4):639-654.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Nicholas Agar (2007). Embryonic Potential and Stem Cells. Bioethics 21 (4):198–207.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. S. Aksoy (2005). Making Regulations and Drawing Up Legislation in Islamic Countries Under Conditions of Uncertainty, with Special Reference to Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):399-403.
    Stem cell research is a newly emerging technology that promises a wide variety of benefits for humanity. It has, however, also caused much ethical, legal, and theological debate. While some forms of its application were prohibited in the beginning, they have now started to be used in many countries. This fact obliges us to discuss the regulation of stem cell research at national and international level. It is obvious that in order to make regulations and to draw up legislation at (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Fatima Agha Al-Hayani (2008). Muslim Perspectives on Stem Cell Research and Cloning. Zygon 43 (4):783-795.
    In Islam, the acquisition of knowledge is a form of worship. But human achievement must be exercised in conformity with God's will. Warnings against feelings of superiority often are coupled with the command to remain within the confines of God's laws and limits. Because of the fear of arrogance and disregard of the balance created by God, any new knowledge or discovery must be applied with careful consideration to maintaining balance in the creation. Knowledge must be applied to ascertain equity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2012). A Metaphysical and Ethical Defense of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 3 (4):209-225.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2007). Respecting Human Embryos Within Stem Cell Research: Seeking Harmony. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):226–244.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Kiarash Aramesh & Soroush Dabbagh (2007). An Islamic View to Stem Cell Research and Cloning: Iran's Experience. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):62-63.
  8. Anthony Atala (2009). Advances in Stem Cell Research. In Eva Zerovnik, Olga Markič & A. Ule (eds.), Philosophical Insights About Modern Science. Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.) (2005). Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This collection brings together original essays demonstrating the cutting edge of philosophical research in medical ethics. With contributions from a range of established and up-and-coming authors, it examines topics at the forefront of medical technology, such as ethical issues raised by developments in how we research stem cells and genetic engineering, as well as new questions raised by methodological changes in how we approach medical ethics.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Bernard Baertschi & Alexandre Mauron (2010). Moral Status Revisited: The Challenge of Reversed Potency. Bioethics 24 (2):96-103.
    Moral status is a vexing topic. Linked for so long to the unending debates about ensoulment and the morality of abortion, it has recently resurfaced in the embryonic stem cell controversy. In this new context, it should benefit from new insights originating in recent scientific advances. We believe that the recently observed capability of somatic cells to return to a pluripotential state (a capability we propose to name 'reversed potency') in a controlled manner requires us to modify the traditional concept (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11. Curt Balch, Kenneth P. Nephew, Tim H.‐M. Huang & Sharmila A. Bapat (2007). Epigenetic “Bivalently Marked” Process of Cancer Stem Cell‐Driven Tumorigenesis. Bioessays 29 (9):842-845.
  12. Françoise Baylis (2009). For Love or Money? The Saga of Korean Women Who Provided Eggs for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):385-396.
    In 2004 and 2005, Woo-Suk Hwang achieved international stardom with publications in Science reporting on successful research involving the creation of stem cells from cloned human embryos. The wonder and success all began to unravel, however, when serious ethical concerns were raised about the source of the eggs for this research. When the egg scandal had completely unfolded, it turned out that many of the women who provided eggs for stem cell research had not provided valid consents and that nearly (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Francoise Baylis (2008). Animal Eggs for Stem Cell Research: A Path Not Worth Taking. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):18-32.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  14. Françoise Baylis (2001). Canada Announces Restrictions on Publicly Funded Stem Cell Research. Hastings Center Report 32 (2):6-7.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Françoise E. Baylis (1990). The Ethics of Ex Utero Research on Spare'non-Viable'ivf Human Embryos. Bioethics 4 (4):311–329.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16. Jan P. Beckmann (2004). On the German Debate on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):603 – 621.
    Germany since 1990 has one of the strictest human embryo protection laws, yet according to the Stem Cell Act of 2002 allows, under strict conditions, the import and use of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) for high priority research goals. The author tries to show how this is taken to be coherent by the parliamentary majority (though not necessarily by the general public) in Germany. In doing so, he firstly looks into the chronicle of the debate in Germany showing its (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. R. Blackford (2006). Stem Cell Research on Other Worlds, or Why Embryos Do Not Have a Right to Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):177-180.
    Anxieties about the creation and destruction of human embryos for the purpose of scientific research on embryonic stem cells have given a new urgency to the question of whether embryos have moral rights. This article uses a thought experiment involving two possible worlds, somewhat removed from our own in the space of possibilities, to shed light on whether early embryos have such rights as a right not to be destroyed or discarded . It is argued that early embryos do not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Walter Block (2010). Objections to the Libertarian Stem Cell Compromise. Libertarian Papers 2.
    In Block I offered a compromise between the pro choice position that fervently supports stem cell research, and the pro life philosophy which bitterly opposes it. The compromise was a contest: allow would be researchers to create as many fertilized eggs as they wished. But, also, these should be offered up to would be parents to adopt all of these “children” as they wanted. If and only if there were any unadopted fetuses remaining in the laboratories of the nation would (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Anna‐Marei Boehm, Philip Rosenstiel & Thomas Cg Bosch (2013). Stem Cells and Aging From a Quasi‐Immortal Point of View. Bioessays 35 (11):994-1003.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. Andrea Bonnicksen (2007). Pt. V. Reproduction and Cloning. Abortion Revisited / Don Marquis ; Moral Status, Moral Value, and Human Embryos: Implications for Stem Cell Research / Bonnie Steinbock ; Therapeutic Cloning: Politics and Policy. [REVIEW] In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2005). Embryos and Eagles: Symbolic Value in Research and Reproduction. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (01):22-34.
    On both sides of the debate on the use of embryos in stem cell research, and in reproductive technologies more generally, rhetoric and symbolic images have been evoked to influence public opinion. Human embryos themselves are described as either “very small human beings” or “small clusters of cells.” The intentions behind the use of these phrases are clear. One description suggests that embryos are already members of our community and share with us a right to life or at least respectful (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2005). Stem Cell Research, Personhood and Sentience. Reproductive Biomedicine Online 10:68-75.
    In this paper the permissibility of stem cell research on early human embryos is defended. It is argued that, in order to have moral status, an individual must have an interest in its own wellbeing. Sentience is a prerequisite for having an interest in avoiding pain, and personhood is a prerequisite for having an interest in the continuation of one's own existence. Early human embryos are not sentient and therefore they are not recipients of direct moral consideration. Early human embryos (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23. Thomas C. G. Bosch (2009). Hydra and the Evolution of Stem Cells. Bioessays 31 (4):478-486.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24. D. W. Brock (2006). Is a Consensus Possible on Stem Cell Research? Moral and Political Obstacles. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):36-42.
    Neither of the two central moral and political obstacles to human embryonic stem cell research survives critical scrutinyThis paper argues that neither of the two central moral and political obstacles to human embryonic stem cell research survives critical scrutiny: first, that derivation of HESCs requires the destruction of human embryos which are full human persons or are at least deserving of respect incompatible with their destruction; second, that creation of HESCs using somatic cell nuclear transfer or cloning is immoral. First, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  25. Dan W. Brock (2010). Creating Embryos for Use in Stem Cell Research. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (2):229-237.
    In this paper I will address whether the restriction on the creation of human embryos solely for the purpose of research in which they will be used and destroyed in the creation of human stem cell lines is ethically justified. Of course, a cynical but perhaps accurate reading of the new Obama policy is that leaving this restriction in place was done for political, not ethical, reasons, in light of the apparent public opposition to creating embryos for use in this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  26. Miriam Brouillet & Leigh Turner (2005). Bioethics, Religion, and Democratic Deliberation: Policy Formation and Embryonic Stem Cell Research. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):49-63.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Mark Brown (2013). No Ethical Bypass of Moral Status in Stem Cell Research. Bioethics 27 (1):12-19.
    Recent advances in reprogramming technology do not bypass the ethical challenge of embryo sacrifice. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) research has been and almost certainly will continue to be conducted within the context of embryo sacrifice. If human embryos have moral status as human beings, then participation in iPS research renders one morally complicit in their destruction; if human embryos have moral status as mere precursors of human beings, then advocacy of iPS research policy that is inhibited by embryo sacrifice (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Mark T. Brown (2009). Moral Complicity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 1-22.
    Direct reprogramming of human skin cells makes available a source of pluripotent stem cells without the perceived evil of embryo destruction, but the advent of such a powerful biotechnology entangles stem cell research in other forms of moral complicity. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research had its origins in human embryonic stem cell research and the projected biomedical applications of iPS cells almost certainly will require more embryonic stem cell research. Policies that inhibit iPSC research in order to avoid moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. W. Malcolm Byrnes (2008). Direct Reprogramming and Ethics in Stem Cell Research. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (2):277-290.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. W. Malcolm Byrnes & Edward J. Furton (2009). Comments on “Moral Complicity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research”. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):202-205.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. S. A. Cai, Xiaobing Fu & Zhiyong Sheng (2007). Dedifferentiation: A New Approach in Stem Cell Research. BioScience 57 (8):655-662.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Benjamin Capps (2008). Authoritative Regulation and the Stem Cell Debate. Bioethics 22 (1):43–55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Benjamin Capps (2002). The European Union and Stem Cell Research: A Turnaround on Policy Regarding Human Embryo Research? Legal Ethics 5 (1-2):1-2.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Alexander M. Capron (2002). Stem Cell Politics: The New Shape to the Road Ahead. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):35 – 37.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Katherine Carroll & Catherine Waldby (2012). Informed Consent and Fresh Egg Donation for Stem Cell Research. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):29-39.
    This article develops a model of informed consent for fresh oöcyte donation for stem cell research, during in vitro fertilisation (IVF), by building on the importance of patients’ embodied experience. Informed consent typically focuses on the disclosure of material information. Yet this approach does not incorporate the embodied knowledge that patients acquire through lived experience. Drawing on interview data from 35 patients and health professionals in an IVF clinic in Australia, our study demonstrates the uncertainty of IVF treatment, and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. Peter J. Cataldo (2002). A Cooperation Analysis of Embryonic Stem Cell Research. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (1):35-41.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Timothy Caulfield (2010). Stem Cell Research and Economic Promises. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (2):303-313.
    In the context of stem cell research, the promise of economic growth has become a common policy argument for adoption of permissive policies and increased government funding. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit, which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, public funding policies, and the popular press, have arguably created a great deal of expectation. Can stem cell research deliver on the economic promise? And what are the implications of this economic ethos for the researchers who (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  38. Chinese National Human Genome Cente (2004). Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research (A Recommended Manuscript). Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):47-54.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Kai Chen Chang, Cheng Wang & Hongyan Wang (2012). Balancing Self‐Renewal and Differentiation by Asymmetric Division: Insights From Brain Tumor Suppressors in Drosophila Neural Stem Cells. Bioessays 34 (4):301-310.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Audrey Chapman & Anne L. Hiskes (2008). Unscrambling the Eggs: Cybrid Research Through an Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee (ESCRO) Lens. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):44 – 46.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41. R. Charbonnier (2008). The Contribution of the Protestant Church in Germany to the Pluralist Discourse in Bioethics: The Case of Stem Cell Research. Christian Bioethics 14 (1):95-107.
    Christian contributions to the public discourse on bioethics come from individual Christians, from Christian churches, and from academic theology. All contributors must frame their arguments in such a way as to account for the pluralism of worldviews in contemporary Germany. For this purpose, they must take issue with certain hermeneutical and discourse theoretical considerations. That is to say, in order for their contributions to remain normatively authentic in a Christian and Protestant sense, these must relate to Scripture and to Protestantism's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42. William P. Cheshire (2004). Human Embryo Research and the Language of Moral Uncertainty. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):1 – 5.
    In bioethics as in the sciences, enormous discussions often concern the very small. Central to public debate over emerging reproductive and regenerative biotechnologies is the question of the moral status of the human embryo. Because news media have played a prominent role in framing the vocabulary of the debate, this study surveyed the use of language reporting on human embryo research in news articles spanning a two-year period. Terminology that devalued moral status - for example, the descriptors things, property, tissue, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. James F. Childress (2002). Federal Policy Toward Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):34 – 35.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Myra J. Christopher (2007). "Show Me" Bioethics and Politics. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):28 – 33.
    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45. Cynthia B. Cohen (2006). Religion, Public Reason, and Embryonic Stem Cell Research. In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Cynthia B. Cohen (2005). Promises and Perils of Public Deliberation: Contrasting Two National Bioethics Commissions on Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (3):269-288.
    : National bioethics commissions have struggled to develop ethically warranted methods for conducting their deliberations. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission in its report on stem cell research adopted an approach to public deliberation indebted to Rawls in that it sought common ground consistent with shared values and beliefs at the foundation of a well-ordered democracy. In contrast, although the research cloning and stem cell research reports of the President's Council on Bioethics reveal that it broached two different methods of public (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Cynthia B. Cohen (2004). Stem Cell Research in the U.S. After the President's Speech of August 2001. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):97-114.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48. Cynthia B. Cohen (2002). Stem Cell Research and the Role of the New President's Council on Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):43 – 44.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Cynthia B. Cohen Peter J. Cohen (2010). International Stem Cell Tourism and the Need for Effective Regulation: Part II: Developing Sound Oversight Measures and Effective Patient Support. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (3):207-230.
    Clinics and hospitals around the globe are offering stem cell treatments to persons with serious conditions for whom no effective therapies are available in their home countries. Many of these treatments, which are touted as cures for such conditions as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injuries, have not gone through clinical trials that establish their safety and efficacy. Indeed, it is unclear whether some of them even utilize stem cells. State regulation of these therapies tends to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Mary A. Majumder Cynthia B. Cohen (2009). Future Directions for Oversight of Stem Cell Research in the United States: An Update. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):pp. 195-200.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 331