38 found
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  1.  7
    Meir Hemmo & Orly R. Shenker, A Physicalist Account of Multiple Realizability in the Special Sciences.
    Multiple realizability seems to be empirically justified and provides the conceptual basis for the autonomy of the special sciences. But it is mysterious. In this talk I propose a new reductionist approach to the special sciences that removes the mystery: I explain why the special sciences kinds appear to be multiply realized although they are identical with physical kinds and in what sense the special sciences kinds and laws are autonomous although they are physical laws. This approach is based on (...)
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  2.  27
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2015). Probability and Typicality in Deterministic Physics. Erkenntnis 80 (3):575-586.
    In this paper we analyze the relation between the notion of typicality and the notion of probability and the related question of how the choice of measure in deterministic theories in physics may be justified. Recently it has been argued that although the notion of typicality is not a probabilistic notion, it plays a crucial role in underwriting probabilistic statements in classical statistical mechanics and in Bohm’s theory. We argue that even in theories with deterministic dynamics, like classical statistical mechanics (...)
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  3. Meir Hemmo (2007). Quantum Probability and Many Worlds. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (2):333-350.
    We discuss the meaning of probabilities in the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. We start by presenting very briefly the many worlds theory, how the problem of probability arises, and some unsuccessful attempts to solve it in the past. Then we criticize a recent attempt by Deutsch to derive the quantum mechanical probabilities from the nonprobabilistic parts of quantum mechanics and classical decision theory. We further argue that the Born probability does not make sense even as an additional probability (...)
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  4. Meir Hemmo & Amit Hagar (2013). The Primacy of Geometry. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (3):357-364.
    We argue that current constructive approaches to the special theory of relativity do not derive the geometrical Minkowski structure from the dynamics but rather assume it. We further argue that in current physics there can be no dynamical derivation of primitive geometrical notions such as length. By this we believe we continue an argument initiated by Einstein.
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  5. Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2003). Quantum Decoherence and the Approach to Equilibrium. Philosophy of Science 70 (2):330-358.
    We discuss a recent proposal by Albert (1994a; 1994b; 2000, ch. 7) to recover thermodynamics on a purely dynamical basis, using the quantum theory of the collapse of the wave function by Ghirardi, Rimini, and Weber (1986). We propose an alternative way to explain thermodynamics within no-collapse interpretations of quantum mechanics. Our approach relies on the standard quantum mechanical models of environmental decoherence of open systems (e.g., Joos and Zeh 1985; Zurek and Paz 1994). This paper presents the two approaches (...)
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  6. Orly Shenker & Meir Hemmo (2011). Maxwell's Demon. Journal of Philosophy 107 (8):389-411.
    "Maxwell's Demon", the famous thought experiment of James Clerk Maxwell, has been devised in 1867 as a counter example for the Second Law of thermodynamics. During the 140 years since the Demon was first suggested, numerous attempts have been made to counter Maxwell's argument. The attempts have been to show that Maxwell was wrong, since his Demon cannot work for one reason or another (see Leff and Rex 2003 for details and references). In this paper we show (following an argument (...)
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  7. Meir Hemmo & Itamar Pitowsky (2003). Probability and Nonlocality in Many Minds Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):225-243.
    We argue that certain types of many minds (and many worlds) interpretations of quantum mechanics, e.g. Lockwood ([1996a]), Deutsch ([1985]) do not provide a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilistic algorithm. By contrast, in Albert and Loewer's ([1988]) version of the many minds interpretation, there is a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilities. We consider Albert and Loewer's probability interpretation in the context of Bell-type and GHZ-type states and argue that it implies a certain (weak) form of nonlocality. (...)
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  8. Amit Hagar & Meir Hemmo (2006). Explaining the Unobserved: Why Quantum Theory Ain't Only About Information. Foundations of Physics 36 (9):1295-1234.
    A remarkable theorem by Clifton, Bub and Halvorson (2003) (CBH) characterizes quantum theory in terms of information--theoretic principles. According to Bub (2004, 2005) the philosophical significance of the theorem is that quantum theory should be regarded as a ``principle'' theory about (quantum) information rather than a ``constructive'' theory about the dynamics of quantum systems. Here we criticize Bub's principle approach arguing that if the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics remains intact then there is no escape route from solving the measurement (...)
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  9.  4
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2012). Measures Over Initial Conditions. In Yemima Ben-Menahem & Meir Hemmo (eds.), Probability in Physics. Springer 87--98.
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  10.  97
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2001). Can We Explain Thermodynamics By Quantum Decoherence? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):555-568.
    Can we explain the laws of thermodynamics, in particular the irreversible increase of entropy, from the underlying quantum mechanical dynamics? Attempts based on classical dynamics have all failed. Albert (1994a,b; 2000) proposed a way to recover thermodynamics on a purely dynamical basis, using the quantum theory of the collapse of the wavefunction of Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber (1986). In this paper we propose an alternative way to explain thermodynamics within no-collapse interpretations of quantum mechanics. Our approach relies on the standard (...)
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  11.  38
    Joseph Berkovitz & Meir Hemmo (2005). Can Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics Be Reconciled with Relativity? Philosophy of Science 72 (5):789-801.
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  12.  14
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2011). Szilard’s Perpetuum Mobile. Philosophy of Science 78 (2):264-283.
    In a previous article, we have demonstrated by a general phase space argument that a Maxwellian Demon is compatible with statistical mechanics. In this article, we show how this idea can be put to work in the prevalent model of the Demon, namely, a particle-in-a-box, used, for example, by Szilard and Bennett. In the literature, this model is used in order to show that a Demon is incompatible with statistical mechanics, either classical or quantum. However, we show that a detailed (...)
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  13. Meir Hemmo (1996). Possible Worlds in the Modal Interpretation. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):337.
    An outline for a modal interpretation in terms of possible worlds is presented. The so-called Schmidt histories are taken to correspond to the physically possible worlds. The decoherence function defined in the histories formulation of quantum theory is taken to prescribe a non-classical probability measure over the set of the possible worlds. This is shown to yield dynamics in the form of transition probabilities for occurrent events in each world. The role of the consistency condition is discussed.
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  14.  58
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2006). Von Neumann's Entropy Does Not Correspond to Thermodynamic Entropy. Philosophy of Science 73 (2):153-174.
    Von Neumann argued by means of a thought experiment involving measurements of spin observables that the quantum mechanical quantity is conceptually equivalent to thermodynamic entropy. We analyze Von Neumann's thought experiment and show that his argument fails. Over the past few years there has been a dispute in the literature regarding the Von Neumann entropy. It turns out that each contribution to this dispute addressed a different special case. In this paper we generalize the discussion and examine the full matrix (...)
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  15.  43
    Guido Bacciagaluppi & Meir Hemmo (1996). Modal Interpretations, Decoherence and Measurements. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 27 (3):239-277.
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  16.  29
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2006). Von Neumann's Entropy Does Not Correspond to Thermodynamic Entropy. Philosophy of Science 73 (2):153-174.
    Von Neumann argued by means of a thought experiment involving measurements of spin observables that the quantum mechanical quantity is conceptually equivalent to thermodynamic entropy. We analyze Von Neumann's thought experiment and show that his argument fails. Over the past few years there has been a dispute in the literature regarding the Von Neumann entropy. It turns out that each contribution to this dispute addressed a different special case. In this paper we generalize the discussion and examine the full matrix (...)
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  17.  75
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2003). Quantum Decoherence and the Approach to Equilibrium. Philosophy of Science 70 (2):330-358.
    We discuss a recent proposal by Albert to recover thermodynamics on a purely dynamical basis, using the quantum theory of the collapse of the wave function of Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber. We propose an alternative way to explain thermodynamics within no-collapse interpretations of quantum mechanics. Our approach relies on the standard quantum mechanical models of environmental decoherence of open systems, \eg Joos and Zeh and Zurek and Paz. This paper presents the two approaches and discusses their advantages. The problems they (...)
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  18.  68
    Meir Hemmo & Itamar Pitowsky (2003). Probability and Nonlocality in Many Minds Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):225-243.
    We argue that a certain type of many minds (and many worlds) interpretations of quantum mechanics, e.g. Lockwood ([1996a]), Deutsch ([1985]) do not provide a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilistic algorithm. By contrast, in Albert and Loewer's ([1988]) version of the many minds interpretation there is a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilities. We consider Albert and Loewer's probability interpretation in the context of Bell-type and GHZ-type states and argue that it implies a certain (weak) form of (...)
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  19.  28
    Guido Bacciagaluppi & Meir Hemmo (1994). Making Sense of Approximate Decoherence. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:345 - 354.
    In realistic situations where a macroscopic system interacts with an external environment, decoherence of the quantum state, as derived in the decoherence approach, is only approximate. We argue that this can still give rise to facts, provided that during the decoherence process states that are, respectively, always close to eigenvectors of pointer position and record observable are correlated. We show in a model that this is always the case.
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  20.  45
    Orly R. Shenker & Meir Hemmo, Prediction and Retrodiction in Boltzmann's Approach to Classical Statistical Mechanics.
    In this paper we address two problems in Boltzmann's approach to statistical mechanics. The first is the justification of the probabilistic predictions of the theory. And the second is the inadequacy of the theory's retrodictions.
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  21.  69
    Orly Shenker & Meir Hemmo (2011). Introduction to the Philosophy of Statistical Mechanics: Can Probability Explain the Arrow of Time in the Second Law of Thermodynamics? Philosophy Compass 6 (9):640-651.
    The arrow of time is a familiar phenomenon we all know from our experience: we remember the past but not the future and control the future but not the past. However, it takes an effort to keep records of the past, and to affect the future. For example, it would take an immense effort to unmix coffee and milk, although we easily mix them. Such time directed phenomena are sub- sumed under the Second Law of Thermodynamics. This law characterizes our (...)
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  22.  12
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2015). The Emergence of Macroscopic Regularity. Mind and Society 14 (2):221-244.
    Special sciences (such as biology, psychology, economics) describe various regularities holding at some high macroscopic level. One of the central questions concerning these macroscopic regularities is how they are related to the laws of physics governing the underlying microscopic physical reality. In this paper we show how a macroscopic regularity may emerge from an underlying micro- scopic structure, and how the appearance of multiple realizability of the special sciences by physics comes about in a reductionist-physicalist framework. On this basis we (...)
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  23.  38
    Joseph Berkovitz & Meir Hemmo (2005). Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics and Relativity: A Reconsideration. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 35 (3):373-397.
    Two of the main interpretative problems in quantum mechanics are the so-called measurement problem and the question of the compatibility of quantum mechanics with relativity theory. Modal interpretations of quantum mechanics were designed to solve both of these problems. They are no-collapse (typically) indeterministic interpretations of quantum mechanics that supplement the orthodox state description of physical systems by a set of possessed properties that is supposed to be rich enough to account for the classical-like behavior of macroscopic systems, but sufficiently (...)
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  24. Paul Thagard, Kim Sterelny, Richard Richards, Denis M. Walsh, James W. McAllister, Marcel Boumans, Meir Hemmo, Orly Shenker & Matthew W. Parker (2003). 10. Response to Vollmer's Review of Minds and Molecules Response to Vollmer's Review of Minds and Molecules (Pp. 391-398). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 70 (2).
     
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  25.  83
    Meir Hemmo (2003). Remarks on the Direction of Time in Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1458-1471.
    I consider the question of the direction of time in the context of the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics. I focus on the special role of decoherence in the recovery of time asymmetric behaviour, such as the collapse of the quantum state and the thermodynamic regularities. The discussion is based on results in the consistent histories approach (Gell-Mann and Hartle 1993) and in decoherence theory (Zurek and Paz 1994). Finally, I compare the status of the direction of time in Everett (...)
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  26.  77
    Meir Hemmo (2003). Remarks on the Direction of Time in Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1458-1471.
    I argue that in the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics time has no fundamental direction. I further discuss a way to recover thermodynamics in this interpretation using decoherence theory (Zurek and Paz 1994). Albert's proposal to recover thermodynamics from the collapse theory of Ghirardi et al. (1986) is also considered.
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  27.  6
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2015). Letter to the Editor. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (1):91-93.
    In our book The Road to Maxwell’s Demon (RMD) (Cambridge University Press 2012) we proposed a new outline for a reductive account of statistical mechanics in which thermodynamics is reduced to classical mechanics. In a recent review Valia Allori says that we misunderstood Boltzmann’s account of statistical mechanics with respect to two issues: (1) the nature of typicality considerations in Boltzmann’s explanation of the Second Law - and here she provides no argument whatsoever; and (2) Boltzmann’s notion of probability. As (...)
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  28.  35
    Joseph Berkovitz & Meir Hemmo, How to Reconcile Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics with Relativity.
    Recent no go theorems by Dickson and Clifton (1998), Arntzenius (1998) and Myrvold (2002) demonstrate that current modal interpretations are incompatible with relativity. In this paper we propose strategies for how to circumvent these theorems. We further show how these strategies can be developped into new modal interpretations in which the properties of systems are in general either holistic or relational. We explicitly write down an outline of dynamics for these properties which does not pick out a preferred foliation of (...)
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  29.  5
    Meir Hemmo & Itamar Pitowsky (2007). Quantum Probability and Many Worlds. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 38 (2):333-350.
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  30.  1
    Guido Bacciagaluppi & Meir Hemmo (1996). Modal Interpretations, Decoherence and Measurements. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 27 (3):239-277.
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  31.  1
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2005). Quantum Decoherence and the Approach to Equilibrium. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (4):626-648.
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  32.  1
    Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2013). Probability Zero in Bohm’s Theory. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):1148-1158.
    We describe two anomalies in Bohm’s quantum theory that shed light on the notion of probability zero in quantum mechanics. In one anomaly the preferred reference frame may be discovered.
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  33.  6
    Yemima Ben-Menahem & Meir Hemmo (eds.) (2012). Probability in Physics. Springer.
    Emch, G.G., Liu, C.: The Logic of Thermostatistical Physics. Springer, Berlin/ Heidelberg (2002) 11. Frigg, R., Werndl, C.: Entropy – a guide for the perplexed. Forthcoming in: Beisbart, C., Hartmann, S. (eds.) Probabilities in Physics. Oxford  ...
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  34. Edward Erwin, Meir Hemmo, Orly Shenker, Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla, Jeremy Simon & Kim Sterelny (2006). 1. David J. Buller: Adapting Minds: Evolutionary Psychology and the Persistent Quest for Human Nature, David J. Buller: Adapting Minds: Evolutionary Psychology and the Persistent Quest for Human Nature, (Pp. 232-246). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 73 (2).
     
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  35. Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2001). Can We Explain Thermodynamics By Quantum Decoherence? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (4):555-568.
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  36. Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2010). Maxwell's Demon. Journal of Philosophy 107 (8):389-411.
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  37. Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2012). The Mathematical Representation of the Arrow of Time. Iyyun 61:167-192.
    This paper distinguishes between 3 meanings of reversal, all of which are mathematically equivalent in classical mechanics: velocity reversal, retrodiction, and time reversal. It then concludes that in order to have well defined velocities a primitive arrow of time must be included in every time slice. The paper briefly mentions that this arrow cannot come from the Second Law of thermodynamics, but this point is developed in more details elsewhere.
     
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  38. Meir Hemmo (2002). The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (3):541-553.
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