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Profile: William Ruddick (New York University)
  1. William Ruddick, Death for Doctors.
    Philosophers have simplified brain death issues by drawing two distinctions--that between dead persons and dead bodies or organisms, and that between the concept of definition of death and the criteria for determining when and that death has occurred. The result has been protracted debates as to whether the death of patients is the death of persons or the death of organisms, and whether physicians should use cardio-respiratory criteria, whole brain criteria, or higher brain criteria. Advocates of the death of persons (...)
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  2. William Ruddick, Parenthood: Three Concepts and a Principle.
    Summary. Disputes about pediatric, educational, and other child-related matters may reflect more general concepts of parenthood, including parental rights and responsibilities. These concepts may be child-centered, focusing either on a child’s needs or on a child’s development. Needs and development are not wholly distinct or in competition, but some parents may emphasize one or the other and, in case of conflict, favor one over the other. Such emphasis and preference tends to distinguish parents as child-carers and parents as child-raisers (in (...)
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  3. Lori Gruen & William Ruddick (2009). Biomedical and Environmental Ethics Alliance: Common Causes and Grounds. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):457-466.
    In the late 1960s Van Rensselaer Potter, a biochemist and cancer researcher, thought that our survival was threatened by the domination of military policy makers and producers of material goods ignorant of biology. He called for a new field of Bioethics—“a science of survival.” Bioethics did develop, but with a narrower focus on medical ethics. Recently there have been attempts to broaden that focus to bring biomedical ethics together with environmental ethics. Though the two have many differences—in habits of thought, (...)
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  4. William Ruddick (2005). "Biographical Lives" Revisited and Extended. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):501 - 515.
    After reviewing the history, rationale, and Jim Rachels’ varied uses of the notion of biographical lives, the essay further develops its social dimensions and proposes an ontological analysis. Whether one person is leading one life or more turns on the number of separate social worlds he or she creates and maintains. Furthermore, lives are constituted by narrated events in a story. Lives, however, are not stories, but rather are extended “verbal objects,” that is, “narrative objects” with a hybrid character, both (...)
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  5. William Ruddick (2003). Answering Parents' Questions. Journal of Clinical Ethics 14 (1-2):68.
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  6. William Ruddick (2001). Prejudice Against "Unbalanced" Families. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):34 – 36.
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  7. William Ruddick (1999). Hope and Deception. Bioethics 13 (3-4):343-357.
    There are, I thinks too many morally significant exceptions to accept the physician's rationales or the bioethicist's criticisms, stated siveepingly. Physicians need to take account of the harms caused by loss of hopes, especially false hopes due to deception, as Ivell, as of the harms of successfully maintained deceptive hopes. As for autonomy, hopes even..
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  8. William Ruddick (1997). Do Doctors Undertreat Pain? Bioethics 11 (3-4):246-255.
    At graduation, some North American medical students repeat the Prayer of Maimonides "never to forget that the patient is a fellow creature in pain, not a mere vessel of disease." [2] How could a physician ever forget that a patient is in pain? Don't physicians confront constant reminders­moans, groans, winces, and other obvious manifestations of pain? Yes, but it is those very "reminders," as I shall explain, that provoke at least two kinds of forgetting common among physicians­one, psychological and the (...)
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  9. William Ruddick (1994). Transforming Homes and Hospitals. Hastings Center Report 24 (5):11-14.
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  10. William Ruddick (1988). Social Self-Deceptions. In Brian P. McLaughlin & Amelie O. Rorty (eds.), Perspectives on Self-Deception. University of California Press. 380--389.
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  11. William Ruddick (1983). 1 What Should We Teach and Test? Hastings Center Report 13 (3):20-22.
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  12. William Ruddick & William Wilcox (1982). Operating on the Fetus. Hastings Center Report 12 (5):10-14.
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  13. William Ruddick (1980). Philosophy and Public Affairs. Social Research 47 (4):734-748.
    In the last decade many academic philosophers in the United States have "gone public." In television interviews, newspapers, and neighborhood meetings they have discussed misuse of animals, whistle-blowing, and world hunger. Philosophers sit on presidential commissions on medical experimentation, on scientific research review boards, on committees to draft codes of conduct for trial lawyers, social workers, and senators. They consult with town planners, prison officials and inmates, generals, corporation executives, and hospitals staffs. They run for political office, serve as congressional (...)
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  14. William Ruddick (1979). Doctors' Rights and Work. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):192-203.
  15. William Ruddick (1971). Physical Equations and Identity. In Milton Karl Munitz (ed.), Identity and Individuation. New York,New York University Press. 233--250.
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  16. William Ruddick (1968). Causal Connection. Synthese 18 (1):46 - 67.
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  17. William Ruddick (1968). On Responses and Reactions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):65 – 78.
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