Bookmark and Share

Hope

Edited by Andrew Chignell (Cornell University)
Assistant editor: Alex Esposito (Cornell University)
About this topic
Summary What is hope, from a philosophical point of view?  Can hope be characterized in terms of belief (or degrees of belief) plus some sort of desire or affect? If this kind of “belief-plus” analysis insufficient to characterize hope, what other conditions are required? Are there different kinds of hope – some that are susceptible to belief-plus analysis, and others that aren’t? For instance, could we regard the “idle hope” that I win the lottery as constituted by the belief that it’s possible plus the desire that it happen, but then develop more robust conceptions of the kinds of hope that actively engage deliberation and moral psychology (e.g. the hope that I recover from this terminal diagnosis, despite the long odds)? How does a particular view of hope (or one of its kinds) relate to traditional accounts of hope as a human virtue? Is hope a virtue? If some kind of hope is a virtue, is it a moral virtue, or an intellectual one, or some sort of hybrid?
  Show all references
Related categories
Siblings:See also:
475 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 475
  1. E. Abegg (1965). Religion as Hope for the Supernatural. Sophia 4 (1):27-33.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. John C. Adams (2010). Hope, Truth, and Rhetoric : Prophecy and Pragmatism in Service of Feminism's Cause. In Marianne Janack (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Richard Rorty. Pennsylvania State University Press
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Robert Merrihew Adams (1995). Moral Faith. Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):75-95.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  4. Robert Merrihew Adams (1987). The Virtue of Faith and Other Essays in Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Robert Merrihew Adams has been a leader in renewing philosophical respect for the idea that moral obligation may be founded on the commands of God. This collection of Adams' essays, two of which are previously unpublished, draws from his extensive writings on philosophical theology that discuss metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical issues surrounding the concept of God--whether God exists or not, what God is or would be like, and how we ought to relate ourselves to such a being. Adams studies the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  5. Robert Merrihew Adams (1979). Moral Arguments for Theistic Belief. In C. F. Delaney (ed.), Rationality and Religious Belief. University of Notre Dame Press
    Moral arguments were the type of theistic argument most characteristic of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. More recently they have become one of philosophy’s abandoned farms. The fields are still fertile, but they have not been cultivated systematically since the latest methods came in. The rambling Victorian farmhouse has not been kept up as well as similar structures, and people have not been stripping the sentimental gingerbread off the porches to reveal the clean lines of argument. This paper is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  6. Robert Anderson (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God - by Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 49 (1):94-96.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Judith Andre (2013). Open Hope as a Civic Virtue. Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different (and notoriously obscure; I do not attempt an exegesis). But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Ronald C. Arnett (2012). Communication Ethics in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt's Rhetoric of Warning and Hope. Southern Illinois University Press.
    Renowned in the disciplines of political theory and philosophy, Hannah Arendt’s searing critiques of modernity continue to resonate in other fields of thought decades after she wrote them. In _Communication Ethics in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt’s Rhetoric of Warning and Hope_, author Ronald C. Arnett offers a groundbreaking examination of fifteen of Arendt’s major scholarly works, considering the German writer’s contributions to the areas of rhetoric and communication ethics for the first time. Arnett focuses on Arendt’s use of the phrase (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Ronald Aronson (2007). Hope and Action. The Philosophers' Magazine 38 (38):40-42.
    One of the paradoxes of the Culture War is that opposites conspire with each other against the rest of us. We are offered an impoverished, narrow conception of reason and knowledge, proposing a stark choice to the rest of us: approach life’s important questions through science, or turn to religion. This was a false choice two hundred years ago, and it remains so today.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Robin Attfield (1995). Population Growth and Hope for Humanity. Social Philosophy Today 11:21-33.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Robert Audi (2011). Rationality and Religious Commitment. OUP Oxford.
    Can it be rational to be religious? Robert Audi gives a persuasive positive answer through an account of rationality and a rich, nuanced understanding of what religious commitment means. It is not just a matter of belief, but of emotions and attitudes such as faith and hope, of one's outlook on the world, and of commitment to live in certain ways.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  12. Robert Audi & William J. Wainwright (eds.) (1986). Rationality, Religious Belief, and Moral Commitment: New Essays in the Philosophy of Religion. Cornell University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Augustine, Handbook on Faith Hope and Love (Outler Translation).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Sidney Axinn (2000). Kant on Possible Hope. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:79-87.
    According to Kant, there are limits to possible hope. For example, hope for a contradiction is obviously not a logically possible hope. However, Kant goes much further and restricts possible hope to what can be possibly experienced. The line between what can and cannot be constructed as an image in space and time limits what can be thought rather than what can be merely mentioned. The apparently modern distinction between use and mention (generally attributed to Frege) is used by Kant (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Sidney Axinn (1994). The Logic of Hope : Extensions of Kant's View of Religion. Rodopi.
    This book is a thorough study of the question posed by Kant, For what can a human being rationally hope? It offers a detailed commentary on Kant's seminal work, Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone, as well as an original development of the logic of three of Kant's basic ideas: ambivalence, ignorance, and hope. Sophisticated analytic techniques, including symbolic logic, are applied to this conceptual matrix. The result is a striking case for the transformation of world society into a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16. Michael Bacon (2011). Richard Rorty : Liberalism, Irony, and Social Hope. In Catherine H. Zuckert (ed.), Political Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: Authors and Arguments. Cambridge University Press
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Peter R. Baelz (1974). The Forgotten Dream: Experience, Hope and God. Mowbrays.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Marie Baird (1997). Death Camp Survival and the Possibility of Hope. Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):385-419.
    This paper will argue that many survivors’ ability to take up their existence hopefully is rooted in the deeply visceral and unintegrable memory of “living the existence of a walking corpse” (Niederland 1968b, 12) that constitutes the ontic basis for their most fundamental presence to self, others, and God. I will show, secondly, that Karl Rahner’s theological formulation of witness as “an act of self transcendence in which the subject reaches up to the unsurpassable and sovereign Mystery which we call (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Manuel Ballester Hernandez (ed.) (2005). Ante Un Mundo Roto: Lecturas Sobre la Esperanza. Universidad Católica San Antonio.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Y. Michael Barilan (forthcoming). From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):165-181.
    For centuries, it has been held that communication of an ominous prognosis has the power to kill patients and that the cultivation of hope, even when deceitful, may expedite recovery (Faden, Beauchamp, and King 1986, 63). Today, truth is considered a higher value than the pleasantness of no-worry. Research shows that patients want to be told the truth and that informed patients do not die prematurely; rather, they fare better psychologically than those kept behind a veil of silence. We also (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Y. Michael Barilan (forthcoming). Hope and Friendship: Being and Having. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):191-195.
    In its first part, the paper explores the challenge of conceptualizing the Thomist theological virtue of hope in Aristotelian terms that are compatible with non-Thomist and even atheist metaphysics as well. I argue that the key concept in this endeavor is friendship—as an Aristotelian virtue, as relational value in Thomist theology, as a recognized value in supportive care and as a kind of ‘personal hope.’ Then, the paper proceeds to examine the possible differences between hope as a virtue and hope (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Paul Bartha (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God – Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):571–574.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Lewis White Beck (1960). A Commentary of Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.
    When this work was first published in 1960, it immediately filled a void in Kantian scholarship.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  24. Martin Beck (2010). Dangerous Memory of Hope. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (4):350-363.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Catharine D. Bell (2009). John Dewey and the Philosophy and Practice of Hope. Education and Culture 25 (1):pp. 66-70.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Andrew Benjamin (1997). Present Hope: Philosophy, Architecture, Judaism. Routledge.
    An understanding of what we mean by the present is one of the key issues in literature, philosophy, and culture today, but also one of the most neglected and misunderstood. _Present Hope_ develops a fascinating philosophical understanding of the present, approaching this question via discussions of the nature of historical time, the philosophy of history, memory, and the role of tragedy. Andrew Benjamin shows how we misleadingly view the present as simply a product of chronological time, ignoring the role of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Ernst Benz (1966). Evolution and Christian Hope. Garden City, N.Y.,Doubleday.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28. Bettina Bergo (2008). A Site From Which to Hope? Levinas Studies 3:117-142.
    We have now had some two decades of Levinas commentary. What remains to be said? Certainly one thing we have learned since Otherwise than Being is that Levinas’s philosophy and his talmudic and confessional writings nourish each other so profoundly that to approach Levinas without understanding the historyof Jewish philosophy — in its confrontations with neo-Platonism, Aristotle, Kant — is to risk misunderstanding Levinas. Insights into the interrelationships between Jewish thought and Levinas’s other humanism have been provided by thinkers like (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Isaiah Berlin (1963). The Presidential Address: "From Hope and Fear Set Free". Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 64 (1):1 - 30.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Harold W. Bernard (forthcoming). Hope Vs. Hopelessness. Humanitas.
    Reviews concepts of hope, despair, and depression. Hope is viewed as the belief and expectation that one has some control over life and the future, that unpleasant events are products of both personal perspective and fate, and that problems will be mastered or will fade.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Mark Bernier (2015). The Task of Hope in Kierkegaard. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Philosophers of religion are often caught up with the epistemic justification of their religious beliefs, rather than the qualities of the religious life that make it valuable. Mark Bernier argues theory of hope, which involves the distinction between mundane and authentic hope, and makes three principal claims. Firstly, while despair involves the absence of hope, a rejection of oneself, and a turn away from one's relation to God, despair is fundamentally an unwillingness to hope. This unwillingness is directed toward authentic (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Donald L. Berry (2004). Hope for Our Time. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):293-294.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Martin A. Bertman (1970). Gabriel Marcel On Hope. Philosophy Today 14 (2):101-105.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Jennifer Beste (2005). Instilling Hope and Respecting Patient Autonomy: Reconciling Apparently Conflicting Duties. Bioethics 19 (3):215–231.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. L. Stafford Betty (2001). Going Beyond James: A Pragmatic Argument for God's Existence. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (2):69-84.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Deryck Beyleveld & Paul Ziche (2015). Towards a Kantian Phenomenology of Hope. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):927-942.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the extent to which Kant’s Critique of the Power of Judgment can be, or otherwise ought to be, regarded as a transcendental phenomenology of hope. Kant states repeatedly that CPoJ mediates between the first two Critiques, or between the theoretical knowledge we arrive at on the basis of understanding and reason’s foundational role for practical philosophy. In other words, exercising the power of judgment is implicated whenever we try to bring together the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Nancy Billias (2010). Hope as a Moral Virtue. In Janette McDonald & Andrea M. Stephenson (eds.), The Resilience of Hope. Rodopi 68--17.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Amy Billingsley (2015). Hope in a Vice: Carole Pateman, Judith Butler, and Suspicious Hope. Hypatia 30 (3):597-612.
    Eve Sedgwick critiques paranoid methodologies for denying a plurality of affective approaches. Instead, she emphasizes affects such as hope, but her description of hope's openness does not address how hope can avoid discourses that appear to offer amelioration while deceptively masking subjugation. In this context, I will argue that suspicion in feminist political philosophy, as shown in the earlier work of Carole Pateman and Judith Butler, provides a cautious approach toward hope's openness without precluding hope altogether. This analysis will reconsider (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Otto Bird (1941). The Christian Basis for Marxist Hope. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 17:120-129.
  40. John Bishop (2006). The Philosophy of Religion: A Programmatic Overview. Philosophy Compass 1 (5):506–534.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41. Ernst Bloch (2008). Is Hope Becoming Disappointment?: The Opening Lecture of Tuebingen 1961. Modern Philosophy 1:013.
    Articles from anthropology - the ontological perspective redefines the "hope" of the specific content. Hope will be disappointed, but will be painful disappointment. Firstly, I hope not convinced and want to be disappointed is directly related to trouble itself contains, circuitous, setbacks, failures and other factors; Second, I hope is an open state forward, I hope not with the things associated with the existing established , but with as to the existence of things not yet linked. Strong hope that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Ernst Bloch (1986). The Principle of Hope. MIT Press.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  43. Stephen Bloch-Schulman (2010). When the "Best Hope" is Not so Hopeful, What Then?: Democratic Thinking, Democratic Pedagogies, and Higher Education. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (4):399-415.
    In 2008, Peter Felten, the founding director of Elon's Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, asked me to coordinate an inaugural two-year teaching and learning seminar for faculty, to focus on some element of engaged learning (Elon University's pedagogical focus). We titled the project the Elon Research Seminar on Engaged Undergraduate Learning. As a philosopher who works at the intersections of political philosophy and the scholarship of teaching and learning and as one interested in the relationships among democracy, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Bloechl Jeffrey, L. Smith David & J. Martino Daniel (eds.) (2004). The Phenomenology of Hope: The Twenty-First Annual Symposium of the Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center: Lectures. Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center, Duquesne University-Gumberg Library.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Roland Bluhm (2010). Wishful Hope. In Janet Horrigan & Ed Wiltse (eds.), Hope Against Hope: Philosophies, Cultures and Politics of Possibility and Doubt. Rodopi 35-53.
    The paper aims at characterising self-deceptive hope, a certain kind of ir-rational hoping. The focus is on ordinary, intentional hope exclusively, i. e. on acts of hoping with a definite object (in contrast to dispositional forms of hope such as hopefulness). If a person S hopes in this way that p, she desires that p, she has a belief about the probability of p, and she affec-tively evaluates this probability in one of two ways: We can distinguish between anxious and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. T. V. Borysova (2005). Metafizychni Rozdumy Pro Nadii͡u. Dnipropetrovska Derz͡h. Finansova Akademii͡a.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Patrick L. Bourgeois (2006). Marcel and Ricoeur: Mystery and Hope at the Boundary of Reason in the Postmodern Situation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (3):421-433.
    This article on mystery and hope at the boundary of reason in the postmodern situation responds to the challenge of postmodern thinking to philosophyby a recourse to the works of Gabriel Marcel and his best disciple, Paul Ricoeur. It develops along the lines of their interpretation of hope as a central phenomenon in human experience and existence, thus shedding light on the philosophical enterprise for the future. It is our purpose to dwell briefly on this postmodern challenge and then, incorporating (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Luc Bovens (1999). The Value of Hope. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):667-681.
    Hope obeys Aristotle's doctrine of the mean: one should neither hope too much, nor too little. But what determines what constitutes too much and what constitutes too little for a particular person at a particular time? The sceptic presents an argument to the effect that it is never rational to hope. An attempt to answer the sceptic leads us in different directions. Decision-theoretic and preference-theoretic arguments support the instrumental value of hope. An investigation into the nature of hope permits us (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  49. Keith Breen (2002). Alasdair MacIntyre and the Hope for a Politics of Virtuous Acknowledged Dependence. Contemporary Political Theory 1 (2):181-201.
    This paper seeks to evaluate the political dimensions to Alasdair MacIntyre's thought. It does so by examining his virtue ethics in light of the political vision set out in Dependent Rational Animals and elsewhere. Key to MacIntyre's project is a form of local community that challenges the modern market and nation-state. This challenge and its philosophical underpinnings situate him as a distinctive figure within contemporary democratic thought. Against his critics, a central claim is that MacIntyre does not fall foul either (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Robert Briscoe (2001). Faith, Social Hope, and Clarity. [REVIEW] Boston Book Review.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 475