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  1.  5
    Social criticism, dissonance, and progress: A socio-epistemic approach.Gianfranco Casuso - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):975-997.
    The immanent approach adopted by most contemporary representatives of the Critical Theory tradition has generally the purpose of offering a foundation for social criticism that, without relying exclusively on explicit or factually accepted principles, avoids both the potential arbitrariness of subjective judgment and the appeal to transcendent criteria. However, this project has not yet paid much attention to the socio-epistemic elements related to the intersubjective praxis of criticism. Based on this concern, I intend to explore the possibility of immanent criticism (...)
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  2.  6
    Social criticism, dissonance, and progress: A socio-epistemic approach.Gianfranco Casuso - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):975-997.
    The immanent approach adopted by most contemporary representatives of the Critical Theory tradition has generally the purpose of offering a foundation for social criticism that, without relying exclusively on explicit or factually accepted principles, avoids both the potential arbitrariness of subjective judgment and the appeal to transcendent criteria. However, this project has not yet paid much attention to the socio-epistemic elements related to the intersubjective praxis of criticism. Based on this concern, I intend to explore the possibility of immanent criticism (...)
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  3.  4
    Social criticism, dissonance, and progress: A socio-epistemic approach.Gianfranco Casuso - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):975-997.
    The immanent approach adopted by most contemporary representatives of the Critical Theory tradition has generally the purpose of offering a foundation for social criticism that, without relying exclusively on explicit or factually accepted principles, avoids both the potential arbitrariness of subjective judgment and the appeal to transcendent criteria. However, this project has not yet paid much attention to the socio-epistemic elements related to the intersubjective praxis of criticism. Based on this concern, I intend to explore the possibility of immanent criticism (...)
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  4.  3
    Social criticism, dissonance, and progress: A socio-epistemic approach.Gianfranco Casuso - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):975-997.
    The immanent approach adopted by most contemporary representatives of the Critical Theory tradition has generally the purpose of offering a foundation for social criticism that, without relying exclusively on explicit or factually accepted principles, avoids both the potential arbitrariness of subjective judgment and the appeal to transcendent criteria. However, this project has not yet paid much attention to the socio-epistemic elements related to the intersubjective praxis of criticism. Based on this concern, I intend to explore the possibility of immanent criticism (...)
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  5.  2
    Social criticism, dissonance, and progress: A socio-epistemic approach.Gianfranco Casuso - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):975-997.
    The immanent approach adopted by most contemporary representatives of the Critical Theory tradition has generally the purpose of offering a foundation for social criticism that, without relying exclusively on explicit or factually accepted principles, avoids both the potential arbitrariness of subjective judgment and the appeal to transcendent criteria. However, this project has not yet paid much attention to the socio-epistemic elements related to the intersubjective praxis of criticism. Based on this concern, I intend to explore the possibility of immanent criticism (...)
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  6.  4
    Social criticism, dissonance, and progress: A socio-epistemic approach.Gianfranco Casuso - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):975-997.
    The immanent approach adopted by most contemporary representatives of the Critical Theory tradition has generally the purpose of offering a foundation for social criticism that, without relying exclusively on explicit or factually accepted principles, avoids both the potential arbitrariness of subjective judgment and the appeal to transcendent criteria. However, this project has not yet paid much attention to the socio-epistemic elements related to the intersubjective praxis of criticism. Based on this concern, I intend to explore the possibility of immanent criticism (...)
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  7.  4
    Social criticism, dissonance, and progress: A socio-epistemic approach.Gianfranco Casuso - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):975-997.
    The immanent approach adopted by most contemporary representatives of the Critical Theory tradition has generally the purpose of offering a foundation for social criticism that, without relying exclusively on explicit or factually accepted principles, avoids both the potential arbitrariness of subjective judgment and the appeal to transcendent criteria. However, this project has not yet paid much attention to the socio-epistemic elements related to the intersubjective praxis of criticism. Based on this concern, I intend to explore the possibility of immanent criticism (...)
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  8.  13
    Beyond technocracy and political theology: John Dewey and the authority of truth.Michelle Chun - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):903-929.
    This article aims to shed light on the so-called post-truth moment and the responses of Walter Lippmann, Carl Schmitt, and John Dewey to the unstable basis and implications of truth—empirical or scientific, moral and axiological—in politics. At stake historically and today is an attempt to find political authority grounded in truth so as to preserve an autonomous sphere of freedom for the individual against the potentially irrational subjectivism backed by coercive force. Lippmann and Schmitt mirror the contemporary distrust (or insistence (...)
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  9.  12
    Beyond technocracy and political theology: John Dewey and the authority of truth.Michelle Chun - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):903-929.
    This article aims to shed light on the so-called post-truth moment and the responses of Walter Lippmann, Carl Schmitt, and John Dewey to the unstable basis and implications of truth—empirical or scientific, moral and axiological—in politics. At stake historically and today is an attempt to find political authority grounded in truth so as to preserve an autonomous sphere of freedom for the individual against the potentially irrational subjectivism backed by coercive force. Lippmann and Schmitt mirror the contemporary distrust (or insistence (...)
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  10.  13
    An unthinkable cinema: Deleuze’s mutant politics of film.Timothy Deane-Freeman - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):930-949.
    In this paper, I defend a conception of Deleuze’s two volumes dedicated to film – Cinema I: The Movement-Image, and Cinema II: The Time-Image – as protracted expressions of his political philosophy. In this context, I will elaborate the difficult and entwined political claims Deleuze makes on behalf of cinema: that it is capable of engendering a tentative ‘belief in the world’, such as is the necessary correlate of political action; that it captures the contemporary political fact that ‘the people (...)
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  11.  8
    An unthinkable cinema: Deleuze’s mutant politics of film.Timothy Deane-Freeman - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):930-949.
    In this paper, I defend a conception of Deleuze’s two volumes dedicated to film – Cinema I: The Movement-Image, and Cinema II: The Time-Image – as protracted expressions of his political philosophy. In this context, I will elaborate the difficult and entwined political claims Deleuze makes on behalf of cinema: that it is capable of engendering a tentative ‘belief in the world’, such as is the necessary correlate of political action; that it captures the contemporary political fact that ‘the people (...)
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  12.  22
    The violence inherent in the system.Joseph Heath - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):883-902.
    The concept of ‘the violence inherent in the system’ was famously satirized by Monty Python in their movie The Holy Grail. In order to avoid ridicule, left-wing theorists and activists for a long time stopped using the expression. The underlying social critique, which had given rise to the expression, was also widely dismissed from serious consideration, merely through invocation of the phrase. Because of this, there has been little explicit discussion of the actual political theory that was being satirized in (...)
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  13. Adorno, Marx, and abstract domination.Eli B. Lichtenstein - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8).
    This article reconstructs and defends Theodor Adorno’s social theory by motivating the central role of abstract domination within it. Whereas critics such as Axel Honneth have charged Adorno with adhering to a reductive model of personal domination, I argue that the latter rather understands domination as a structural and de-individualized feature of capitalist society. If Adorno’s social theory is to be explanatory, however, it must account for the source of the abstractions that dominate modern individuals and, in particular, that of (...)
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  14. Realism in the ethics of immigration.James S. Pearson - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8):950-974.
    The ethics of immigration is currently marked by a division between realists and idealists. The idealists generally focus on formulating morally ideal immigration policies. The realists, however, tend to dismiss these ideals as far-fetched and infeasible. In contrast to the idealists, the realists seek to resolve pressing practical issues relating to immigration, principally by advancing what they consider to be actionable policy recommendations. In this article, I take issue with this conception of realism. I begin by surveying the way in (...)
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  15.  8
    A tripartite model of federalism.Raf Geenens & Helder De Schutter - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (7):753-785.
    The classical account of federalism is bipartite. Federal systems are understood to have a dual nature: on the one hand, there is the central government, and on the other hand, there are the constituent units. We argue instead for a tripartite model of federalism. In this model, a third institutional pillar is added to federal systems. This third pillar deals exclusively with matters related to the institutional architecture of the system. We argue for tripartite federalism on three grounds: a tripartite (...)
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  16.  26
    Calling the news fake: The underlying claims about truth in the post-truth era.Thomas Hainscho - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (7).
    This article deals with the question about the conditions for someone to call something ‘fake news’. It examines cases in which something is called fake news and analyses these cases from an ordinary language point of view as speech acts. Doing so, the analysis explains fake news as the expression of a dissent. The analysis avoids problems of recent attempts to provide a definition of fake news and argues against the view that fake news belong to a so-called post-truth era. (...)
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  17.  58
    The Flesh of Negation: Adorno and Merleau-Ponty contra Heidegger.Daniel Neofetou - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (7):798-813.
    Theodor Adorno’s 1960–1961 lecture course Ontology and Dialectics, recently translated into English, provides the most systematic articulation of his critique of Martin Heidegger. When Adorno delivered three of the lectures at the Collège de France, Maurice Merleau-Ponty was reportedly scandalised as he was at that time developing his own ontology, informed by Heidegger. However, this article problematises the assumption that Adorno’s negative dialectic and Merleau-Ponty’s late ontology are incompatible. First, Adorno’s criticism of Heidegger’s ontology is delineated, with particular focus on (...)
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  18.  26
    The Lacan–Badiou constellation in L’immanence des vérités: A limit on the infinite?Kirk Turner & Caitlyn Lesiuk - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (7):839-855.
    In Alain Badiou’s most recent work, L’immanence des vérités ( The Immanence of Truths), psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan once again figures peripherally but saliently. What is their specific relation in this text, however? We argue that Badiou responds here to the problem raised precisely by the Lacanian subject, situated as it is between the radical subjectivity of the symptom and the possibility of formalization. In L’immanence, he introduces the term ‘absoluteness’ to secure truths against both relativism and transcendental construction. We show (...)
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  19.  14
    Critical Republicanism and the Discursive Demands of Free Speech.Suzanne Whitten - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (7):856-880.
    A growing body of literature in feminist philosophy exposes the way in which occupying a particular group identity inhibits an affected agent’s ability to engage in communicative exchange effectively. These accounts reveal a fault in standard liberal defences of free speech, showing how, if free speech is a goal worth pursuing, then it must involve both a concern about the legitimate limits of state interference and of the effect of social norms on an agent’s communicative capacities. Building on the emergence (...)
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  20.  5
    The aporetic humanism of early Derrida.Michael Williams - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (7):814-838.
    This article focuses on the French philosopher Jacques Derrida’s thought in the 1960s. Though the discourse of the ‘death of man’ was regnant among French avant-garde intellectuals, this article argues that Derrida himself has to be described as a humanist at this stage in his career, even if a reluctant one. The case is made through close textual analysis of three of Derrida’s early and seminal works: ‘Cogito and the History of Madness’ (1963), ‘Violence and Metaphysics: An Essay on the (...)
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  21. How can consciousness be false? Alienation, simulation, and mental ownership.Matteo Bianchin - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (6).
    Alienation has been recently revived as a central theme in critical theory. Current debates, however, tend to focus on normative rather than on explanatory issues. In this paper, I confront the latter and advance an account of alienation that bears on the mechanisms that bring it about in order to locate alienation as a distinctive social and psychological fact. In particular, I argue that alienation can be explained as a disruption induced by social factors in the sense of mental ownership (...)
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  22.  3
    Marcuse’s critique of technology today.Andrew Feenberg - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (6):672-685.
    Marcuse was the face of the Frankfurt School during the 1960s and '70s. His eclipse led, among other unfortunate consequences, to the disappearance of his critique of science and technology. That critique is based on an experiential ontology that derives in part from Marcuse’s background in phenomenology. In this paper I trace the roots of that ontology in his early interpretation of Marx’s Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. One-Dimensional Man takes up the phenomenological critique in a Marxist vein. This (...)
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  23. Self-esteem and competition.Pablo Gilabert - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (6):711-742.
    This paper explores the relations between self-esteem and competition. Self-esteem is a very important good and competition is a widespread phenomenon. They are commonly linked, as people often seek self-esteem through success in competition. Although competition in fact generates valuable consequences and can to some extent foster self-esteem, empirical research suggests that competition has a strong tendency to undermine self-esteem. To be sure, competition is not the source of all problematic deficits in self-esteem, and it can arise for, or undercut (...)
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  24.  28
    ‘To conceal domination in production’: Horkheimer and Adorno’s critical functionalist theory of race.Andrew J. Pierce - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (6):686-710.
    This article revisits the Frankfurt School’s reflections on race, anti-Semitism and fascism, focusing especially on the theory of race implicit in Dialectic of Enlightenment. It argues that this theory has the potential to be developed into a critical functionalist theory of race that avoids both class and race reductionism, offering a thoroughly intersectional competitor to currently dominant philosophies of race. The key to such a theory is the view that racialization plays a functional role in sustaining capitalist exploitation. While Horkheimer (...)
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  25.  16
    Book Review: The Ungovernable Society: A Genealogy of Authoritarian Liberalism. [REVIEW]Joseph Tanke - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (6):743-749.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
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  26.  5
    The made and the made-up.Steven L. Winter - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (6):631-649.
    Truth is an ethical relation. Facts, whether descriptions of the physical world or of historical events, are necessarily mediated by our frames of reference. This contingency opens a space for disagreement that cannot be adjudicated by an absolute standard of truth. For those seeking power or profit, the temptation to exploit this state of undecidability is strong. When many question the institutions that broker meaning – science, the professions, the media – rumors, misinformation, deliberate distortions and falsehoods all proliferate. In (...)
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  27.  1
    Defending rights. Between parliaments and courts.Giuliano Amato - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):533-537.
    In principle, it should be for the Courts, which are not majoritarian institutions, to stand for the rights, even more for the new rights, that are minoritarian by definition. How far can the Courts safely go, when the recognition of such rights raises intense divergencies of opinion, confrontations between different collective identities, that populist movements can support and amplify? When should they leave the decision to the parliaments, which represent the will and the opinions of the citizens?
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  28. Legitimizing political power from below. A reinterpretation of the founding myths of Thebes, Athens, and Rome as a critique against private and public violence.Marina Calloni - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):581-598.
    What do we mean when affirming ‘the powerful return of the state’? Do we have in mind the jus ad bellum employed by aggressive states, or are we thinking of the duties that a state has towards its citizens? Starting from these questions, this article aims to reconceptualize the issue of the political legitimacy of a state by reconsidering the relationship between power and violence. Among other forms of emergencies and violence, then, a legitimate state needs to be capable of (...)
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  29.  2
    “Unpacking state-society relations in the urban space: What are the Limit(s) of compromise?”. The dilemma about answering such a question and some recent Venetian experiences.Silvio Cristiano - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):621-628.
    Confronted by answering a complex question such as ‘What are the Limit(s) of Compromise?’ when ‘unpacking State-Society Relations in the Urban Space’, some problematising thoughts are offered to further elaborate urban studies by resorting to systems thinking and its leverage points concept. Both social and ecological issues are addressed, and specific references to Venice, Italy, are offered, including recent grassroot experiences. The dissertation includes some epistemological dilemmas and some initial projections to start to measure ourselves with a new epoch, able (...)
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  30.  6
    From resistance to transformation – The journey to develop a framework to explore the transformative potential of environmental resistance practices.Mengmeng Cui & Daniele Brombal - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):599-620.
    Standing in front of perhaps the most crucial decade of the future to come, when mankind has just experienced three years of global pandemic, a raging war, extreme climate events and mass extinction of animals and plants, we have arrived at a crossroads. Decisions must be made on whether we charge at full speed to explore alternative social-ecological systems that lead to human well-being and regeneration of nature; or continue down a pathway built on resource extraction, unsustainable and unethical urbanization (...)
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  31.  2
    Roles and rights in the context of just governance and just social mores.Seán Golden - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):554-567.
    Who protects individual liberties and human dignity from domination by the State, by Civil Society or by individuals is a question under debate in China as well as the West, not from the point of view of Liberalism, but from the point of view of ‘Relationality’. Liberalism posits the individual as the measure of these matters but the ‘individual’ in question is an abstraction. Relationality posits social relations as the measure of these matters. Persons are not abstractions. They combine several (...)
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  32.  5
    Liberalism and the problem of domination.Volker Kaul - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):522-532.
    We can distinguish two liberal paradigms that stand in opposition to each other. Liberalism as non-domination seeks to eliminate identities resulting from domination and oppression and hindering the emancipation of individuals. Liberalism as recognition holds that ‘the idea of a human world without identities makes no sense’ (Appiah) and considers identities to have their source in individual liberty and to provide the grounds for pluralism. The two liberal paradigms come to largely different results regarding the role of the state and (...)
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  33.  2
    For whom the bell tolls”? A ‘vulnerability-responsibility’ model based on democratic and ‘dignified’ transactions.Subrata Mitra - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):538-553.
    The welfare state, once seen as the best institutional response to people in need, has steadily come under pressure, as much from shrinking state capacities as from neo-liberal advocates of individual responsibility. Still, despite decline of the post-war consensus on the efficacy of the welfare state, social ‘vulnerability’ still remains the key focus of public policy. However, though much in use in contemporary political discourse, the logical and practical implications of social vulnerability remain unclear. Its essential subjectivity – it is (...)
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  34.  3
    From Chinese civil society to Chinese civil sphere: A conceptual reconfiguration of the space between state and society that facilitates intellectual debates.Runya Qiaoan - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):568-580.
    Scholarship on Chinese civil society suffers from a weak theorization of the concept, in which civil society is generally defined as NGOs (non-governmental organizations) that exists in the third sector. This article examines the dimension between state and society known as ‘civil sphere’, a concept that is broader and more mysterious than the conventional notion of ‘civil society’. Civil sphere can be understood as a discursive structure that defines what is civil and what is uncivil in a society. Taking the (...)
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  35. Annotations.David Rasmussen, Volker Kaul & Alessandro Ferrara - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (5):521-521.
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  36.  35
    Biopolitics in the ‘Psychic Realm’: Han, Foucault and neoliberal psychopolitics.Caroline Alphin & François Debrix - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):477-491.
    This article explores German Korean philosopher Byung-Chul Han’s notion of psychopolitics and his concept of the neoliberal subject. For Han, mental processes are now the primary target of power. This means that, according to Han, biopower must give way to what he calls psychopower since perspectives that critically seek to understand neoliberalism through a biopolitical lens are no longer adequate to contemporary regimes of neoliberal achievement. This article examines and evaluates Han’s argument that Foucauldian biopolitics is obsolete in today’s neoliberal (...)
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  37.  15
    Biopolitics in the ‘Psychic Realm’: Han, Foucault and neoliberal psychopolitics.Caroline Alphin & François Debrix - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):477-491.
    This article explores German Korean philosopher Byung-Chul Han’s notion of psychopolitics and his concept of the neoliberal subject. For Han, mental processes are now the primary target of power. This means that, according to Han, biopower must give way to what he calls psychopower since perspectives that critically seek to understand neoliberalism through a biopolitical lens are no longer adequate to contemporary regimes of neoliberal achievement. This article examines and evaluates Han’s argument that Foucauldian biopolitics is obsolete in today’s neoliberal (...)
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  38.  25
    Biopolitics in the ‘Psychic Realm’: Han, Foucault and neoliberal psychopolitics.Caroline Alphin & François Debrix - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):477-491.
    This article explores German Korean philosopher Byung-Chul Han’s notion of psychopolitics and his concept of the neoliberal subject. For Han, mental processes are now the primary target of power. This means that, according to Han, biopower must give way to what he calls psychopower since perspectives that critically seek to understand neoliberalism through a biopolitical lens are no longer adequate to contemporary regimes of neoliberal achievement. This article examines and evaluates Han’s argument that Foucauldian biopolitics is obsolete in today’s neoliberal (...)
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  39. Expropriation of the expropriators.Jacob Blumenfeld - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):1-17.
    The ‘expropriation of the expropriators’ is a delicious turn of phrase, one that Marx even compares to Hegel’s infamous ‘negation of the negation’. But what does it mean, and is it still relevant today? Before I analyse the content of Marx’s expression, I briefly consider contemporary legal understandings of expropriation, as well as some examples of it. In the remainder of the essay, I spell out different kinds of expropriation in Marx and focus on an ambiguity at the core of (...)
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  40.  12
    The discontents of competition for recognition on social media: Perfectionism, ressentiment, and collective narcissism.Kristupas Ceilutka - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):409-430.
    Individuals frequently utilize social media platforms (SMPs) to express their positive features and receive recognition. Axel Honneth proposes that recognition plays an essential role in social life, explaining both social conflicts and guiding normative social development. While SMPs appear as a perfect tool for the pursuit of recognition, they often fail to achieve the intended results. This paper argues that the failure to achieve recognition through SMPs occurs because SMPs operate according to the neoliberal principle of competition. Competition arises because (...)
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  41.  1
    The discontents of competition for recognition on social media: Perfectionism, ressentiment, and collective narcissism.Kristupas Ceilutka - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):409-430.
    Individuals frequently utilize social media platforms (SMPs) to express their positive features and receive recognition. Axel Honneth proposes that recognition plays an essential role in social life, explaining both social conflicts and guiding normative social development. While SMPs appear as a perfect tool for the pursuit of recognition, they often fail to achieve the intended results. This paper argues that the failure to achieve recognition through SMPs occurs because SMPs operate according to the neoliberal principle of competition. Competition arises because (...)
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  42.  17
    On the very idea of normative foundations in critical social theory.Justin Evans - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):385-408.
    I argue that the problem of normative foundations is insoluble. I discuss how and why the apparent problem arose, particularly within the Frankfurt School. Then, I describe various theories of normative foundations and the criticisms that such theories have faced, such as ethno- and andro-centrism, imperialism, and the failure to fulfill their own aims. I make my main argument by way of an analogy: theories of knowledge have wrestled with the question of whether a “given”’ could act as a certain (...)
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  43.  5
    On the very idea of normative foundations in critical social theory.Justin Evans - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):385-408.
    I argue that the problem of normative foundations is insoluble. I discuss how and why the apparent problem arose, particularly within the Frankfurt School. Then, I describe various theories of normative foundations and the criticisms that such theories have faced, such as ethno- and andro-centrism, imperialism, and the failure to fulfill their own aims. I make my main argument by way of an analogy: theories of knowledge have wrestled with the question of whether a “given”’ could act as a certain (...)
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  44.  3
    Paternalism, respect and dialogue.Soo Jin Kim - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):492-517.
    Supporters of paternalistic policies argue that interference with risky or dangerous choices for citizens’ own good is permissible, as long as those choices are caused by cognitive irrationality or ignorance. Yet, some liberal thinkers argue that despite human irrationality, paternalistic policies are still wrong because they fail to respect citizens as moral equals. I argue that actually both views are mistaken about what respect for citizens requires, because they conceptualize the citizens’ interests from the wrong standpoint. In order for citizens (...)
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  45.  5
    Paternalism, respect and dialogue.Soo Jin Kim - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):492-517.
    Supporters of paternalistic policies argue that interference with risky or dangerous choices for citizens’ own good is permissible, as long as those choices are caused by cognitive irrationality or ignorance. Yet, some liberal thinkers argue that despite human irrationality, paternalistic policies are still wrong because they fail to respect citizens as moral equals. I argue that actually both views are mistaken about what respect for citizens requires, because they conceptualize the citizens’ interests from the wrong standpoint. In order for citizens (...)
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  46.  6
    Paternalism, respect and dialogue.Soo Jin Kim - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):492-517.
    Supporters of paternalistic policies argue that interference with risky or dangerous choices for citizens’ own good is permissible, as long as those choices are caused by cognitive irrationality or ignorance. Yet, some liberal thinkers argue that despite human irrationality, paternalistic policies are still wrong because they fail to respect citizens as moral equals. I argue that actually both views are mistaken about what respect for citizens requires, because they conceptualize the citizens’ interests from the wrong standpoint. In order for citizens (...)
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  47.  1
    Paternalism, respect and dialogue.Soo Jin Kim - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):492-517.
    Supporters of paternalistic policies argue that interference with risky or dangerous choices for citizens’ own good is permissible, as long as those choices are caused by cognitive irrationality or ignorance. Yet, some liberal thinkers argue that despite human irrationality, paternalistic policies are still wrong because they fail to respect citizens as moral equals. I argue that actually both views are mistaken about what respect for citizens requires, because they conceptualize the citizens’ interests from the wrong standpoint. In order for citizens (...)
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  48.  3
    Anonymity, fidelity to law, and digital Civil disobedience.Wulf Loh - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):448-476.
    Making use of the liberal concept of civil disobedience, this paper assesses, under which circumstances instances of illegal digital protest—called “hacktivism”—can be justified vis-à-vis the pro tanto political obligation to obey the law. For this, the paper draws on the three main criteria for liberal civil disobedience—publicity, nonviolence, and fidelity to law—and examines how these can be transferred to the realm of the digital. One of the main disanalogies between street and cyberspace protests is the tendency of hacktivists to remain (...)
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  49.  7
    Anonymity, fidelity to law, and digital Civil disobedience.Wulf Loh - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (4):448-476.
    Making use of the liberal concept of civil disobedience, this paper assesses, under which circumstances instances of illegal digital protest—called “hacktivism”—can be justified vis-à-vis the pro tanto political obligation to obey the law. For this, the paper draws on the three main criteria for liberal civil disobedience—publicity, nonviolence, and fidelity to law—and examines how these can be transferred to the realm of the digital. One of the main disanalogies between street and cyberspace protests is the tendency of hacktivists to remain (...)
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  50.  49
    Political polarization: Radicalism and immune beliefs.Manuel Almagro - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (3):309-331.
    When public opinion gets polarized, the population’s beliefs can experience two different changes: they can become more extreme in their contents or they can be held with greater confidence. These two possibilities point to two different understandings of the rupture that characterizes political polarization: extremism and radicalism. In this article, I show that from the close examination of the best available evidence regarding how we get polarized, it follows that the pernicious type of political polarization has more to do with (...)
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  51.  17
    What is distinctive of political normativity? From domain view to role view.Eva Erman & Niklas Möller - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (3):289-308.
    In the last couple of years, increased attention has been directed at the question of whether there is such a thing as a distinctively political normativity. With few exceptions, this question has so far only been explored by political realists. However, the discussion about a distinctively political normativity raises methodological and meta-theoretical questions of general importance for political theory. Although the terminology varies, it is a widely distributed phenomenon within political theory to rely on a normative source which is said (...)
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  52.  26
    The historical and the transhistorical in Marx’s dialectical method.Aidin Keikhaee - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (3):356-382.
    This essay revisits the question of alterations in Marx’s view of method from the 1857 “Introduction” to Capital. In the wake of the belated upsurge of interest in Marx’s notebooks of 1857–8, posthumously published as the Grundrisse, a dominant interpretation has been developed in Marx scholarship which characterizes the method of the “Introduction” as an ascent from the (transhistorical) abstract to the (historical) concrete and, upon such characterization, stresses the mature Marx’s departure from it. Rereading the 1857 “Introduction” with an (...)
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  53.  13
    Getting the duty to resist right: Remarks on Candice Delmas’s book a duty to resist: When disobedience should be uncivil.Cristina Lafont - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (3):283-288.
    In her book A Duty to Resist, Candice Delmas defends the view that we are not only permitted to disobey gravely unjust laws, but we may have a duty to do so. Moreover, not only civil but also uncivil disobedience may be justified in such cases. To justify both claims she argues that the same principles that justify a duty to obey the law—such as the principle of fairness, Samaritan duty, and associative obligations—also justify a duty to disobey the law. (...)
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  54.  34
    Democratic freedom as an aesthetic achievement: Peirce, Schiller and Cavell on aesthetic experience, play and democratic freedom.Michael Räber - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (3):332-355.
    In this essay, I reconsider the constitution of democratic freedom in aesthetic terms. My interest is in articulating a conception of aesthetic freedom that can be mapped onto a conception of democratic freedom. For this purpose, I bring together Charles Sanders Peirce’s ontology, which comprises fragments of an aesthetic theory, Friedrich Schiller’s concept of aesthetic play and Stanley Cavell’s democratic perfectionism. By providing a philosophical framework for constructing an aesthetics and politics that supports the recent aesthetic turn in political theory, (...)
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  55.  26
    The gentle way in governing: Foucault and the question of neoliberalism.Joseph Tanke - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (3):257-282.
    This essay challenges some of the recent scholarship which claims that Michel Foucault was more sympathetic to neoliberalism than is typically acknowledged. Accordingly, it considers the possible motivations for Foucault’s 1978-1979 lecture course, The Birth of Biopolitics; the relationship between liberalism and the various forms of power identified by Foucault; and, finally, claims that Foucault’s account of the ‘care of the self’ was itself informed by the neoliberal theory of human capital. It finds that Foucault regarded neoliberalism as coercive social (...)
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  56.  3
    (Post-)Truth, populism and the simulation of parrhesia: A feminist critique of truth-telling after Hannah Arendt and Michel Foucault.Mareike Gebhardt - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):178-191.
    Following tropes of light and dark in Amanda Gorman’s poem ‘The Hill We Climb’, the article explores, from a feminist perspective, who counts as a truth-teller. Against the backdrop of Hannah Arendt’s and Michel Foucault’s works on truth-telling, the article theorizes feminist modes of truth-telling. It scrutinizes truth-making in politics while unearthing the andro-centrism in truth-telling. Under the impression of post-truth rhetoric in recent populist landscapes, the article argues for a feminist and intersectional articulation of truth-telling to disclose the gendered (...)
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  57.  10
    Fact versus feeling: What post-truth scholarship can learn from the feminist phenomenology of affect.Erica Harris - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):192-202.
    Although it is a relatively new phenomenon, the most popular descriptions of post-truth operate within the boundaries of the classical dichotomy between emotion and reason that dates back to Plato’s Phaedrus: both, to some extent, view emotions as impediments to knowledge and our ability to live morally upstanding lives (248a-b). Post-truth, which is seen as a threat to reason, social cohesion, and fact-based knowledge claims, is either viewed as the outcome of the failure of our cognitive apparatus, or a consequence (...)
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  58.  3
    Truth queens and gallows humor.Bonnie Honig - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):243-254.
    How can truth be used to fight disinformation without reproducing the “reveal”—oriented or secret-constituting epistemology of the closet, as Eve Sedgwick described it in the Epistemology of the Closet (1990)? and how does her reading of the Book of Esther in that text help illuminate aspects of today’s Trumpism?
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  59.  4
    Feminist takes on post-truth.Catherine Koekoek & Emily Zakin - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):125-138.
    This volume argues that feminist theory can provide distinctive and potent resources to confront and take on post-truth. By ‘post-truth’, we refer to a variety of discourses and practices that subvert the sense that we share a common world. Because post-truth undermines the norms and conditions that make possible shared political practices and institutions, post-truth politics is fundamentally anti-democratic. The most common response to post-truth has, however, come from those who call for reinstating truth and rationality, with special emphasis on (...)
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  60.  11
    The shadow of the eco: Denial and climate change.Elissa Marder - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):139-150.
    This article argues that climate change puts excessive demands on the psyche. The omnipresent specter of climate change and global warming cannot be processed by individual psyches because there is little – if anything – that individual people can do to stop the devastation that hovers on the horizon. Unlike other disasters and calamities that have affected humans (war, genocide, nuclear destruction, pandemics, despotism) climate change presents unique challenges to the human psyche as it engages traumatic temporality on a global (...)
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  61.  6
    How to feminist affect: Feminist comedy and post-truth politics.Jana McAuliffe - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):230-242.
    Under the shifting epistemic and political norms of post-truth politics, the conditions of feminist solidarity and agency are increasingly threatened. This article argues that feminist humour provides models for affective orientations that sustain feminist work and survival during such periods of political crisis. First, I explore a potential issue post-truth politics poses for feminists: That information overload can lead to truth burn-out that threatens intersectional feminist thinking and action. Next, I explain why comedy is well-suited to help maintain feminist work (...)
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  62.  2
    The world in a Geranium pot: Female paranoia and love of detail in Schor, Beauvoir and Arendt.Noga Rotem - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):203-217.
    Might paranoia bear some promise, not only danger, for democratic theory and politics? To suggest that we should treat paranoia with anything but disdain today, in the age of Q anon and other white-supremacist lies, seems dangerous. But three decades ago, feminist theorist Naomi Schor took the risk and defended female paranoia, arguing that paranoia is an appropriate affect for feminist theory and critique. This essay follows Schor’s invitation to risk proximity to paranoia. I argue that the political importance of (...)
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  63.  5
    Can the “real world” please stand up? The struggle for normality as a claim to reality.Maren Wehrle - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):151-163.
    In this paper, I show that a phenomenological concept of normality can be helpful to understand the experiential side of post-truth phenomena. How is one’s longing for, or sense of, normality related to what we deem as real, true, or objective? And to what extent is the sense for “what (really) is” related to our beliefs of what should be? To investigate this, I combine a phenomenological approach to lived normality with a genealogical account of represented normality that sheds light (...)
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  64.  4
    Refusing post-truth with Butler and Honig.Clare Woodford - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):218-229.
    This article argues that although post-truth is understood to pose a particular misogynistic threat to feminism, we cannot assume that feminists should simply oppose post-truth. The way the post-truth debate is constructed is problematic for feminism in three ways: it misconceives the relationship between democracy and truth; utilizes a questionable binary between reason and emotion; and propagates elitist assumptions about protecting democracy from the people. Recognizing the insufficiency of our understanding of post-truth, feminists have called for greater understanding of the (...)
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  65. The politics of the invisible: Post-truth’s instrumental use of transparency and Arendt’s ‘nobody’.Sanem Yazıcıoğlu - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (2):164-177.
    One of the most significant difficulties that we encounter today in the post-truth era is in constructing a reality in the gap between deceptive pre-given facts and how we experience them in our lives. This gap is mostly caused by our incapacity to see reality beyond the given frames and this very characteristic of post-truth enforces us to examine the meaning of seeing more extensively. Two particular reasons make seeing things and people even more difficult: first, the claim of transparency (...)
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  66.  4
    A psychoanalytic conceptual framework for understanding populism.Stefan Bird-Pollan - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):35-59.
    In this paper, I argue for two claims. The first is that all social and political thinking lies along a continuum and that the structure of each thought along the continuum is that of a basic desire for self-determination. Self-determination, I argued, occurs in a variety of ways including, importantly, at a variety of levels of intention. On the one hand, there are the relatively unreflective ways of understanding oneself as autonomous. I attributed this way of thinking of the Neo-Aristotelian (...)
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  67.  3
    A psychoanalytic conceptual framework for understanding populism.Stefan Bird-Pollan - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):35-59.
    In this paper, I argue for two claims. The first is that all social and political thinking lies along a continuum and that the structure of each thought along the continuum is that of a basic desire for self-determination. Self-determination, I argued, occurs in a variety of ways including, importantly, at a variety of levels of intention. On the one hand, there are the relatively unreflective ways of understanding oneself as autonomous. I attributed this way of thinking of the Neo-Aristotelian (...)
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  68.  3
    A psychoanalytic conceptual framework for understanding populism.Stefan Bird-Pollan - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):35-59.
    In this paper, I argue for two claims. The first is that all social and political thinking lies along a continuum and that the structure of each thought along the continuum is that of a basic desire for self-determination. Self-determination, I argued, occurs in a variety of ways including, importantly, at a variety of levels of intention. On the one hand, there are the relatively unreflective ways of understanding oneself as autonomous. I attributed this way of thinking of the Neo-Aristotelian (...)
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  69.  16
    Philosophy and the study of capitalism.Justin D. Evans - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):18-34.
    Sociologists, economists, historians, anthropologists, political theorists, and literary critics have all turned their attention to the study of capitalism. But philosophers remain much less engaged. Why is this? And what could philosophy bring to the study of capitalism? Could it help in the development of a general theory? My main argument here is that philosophy does have an important role to play in the study of capitalism, particularly if we want to develop a general theory. Philosophers must describe something that (...)
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  70.  8
    Philosophy and the study of capitalism.Justin D. Evans - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):18-34.
    Sociologists, economists, historians, anthropologists, political theorists, and literary critics have all turned their attention to the study of capitalism. But philosophers remain much less engaged. Why is this? And what could philosophy bring to the study of capitalism? Could it help in the development of a general theory? My main argument here is that philosophy does have an important role to play in the study of capitalism, particularly if we want to develop a general theory. Philosophers must describe something that (...)
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  71.  7
    Philosophy and the study of capitalism.Justin D. Evans - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):18-34.
    Sociologists, economists, historians, anthropologists, political theorists, and literary critics have all turned their attention to the study of capitalism. But philosophers remain much less engaged. Why is this? And what could philosophy bring to the study of capitalism? Could it help in the development of a general theory? My main argument here is that philosophy does have an important role to play in the study of capitalism, particularly if we want to develop a general theory. Philosophers must describe something that (...)
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  72.  6
    It’s funny because it’s true? Reflections on laughter, deception, and critique.Patrick T. Giamario - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):60-80.
    This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this approach offers a stronger account of its (...)
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  73.  8
    It’s funny because it’s true? Reflections on laughter, deception, and critique.Patrick T. Giamario - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):60-80.
    This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this approach offers a stronger account of its (...)
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  74.  2
    It’s funny because it’s true? Reflections on laughter, deception, and critique.Patrick T. Giamario - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):60-80.
    This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this approach offers a stronger account of its (...)
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  75.  3
    It’s funny because it’s true? Reflections on laughter, deception, and critique.Patrick T. Giamario - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):60-80.
    This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this approach offers a stronger account of its (...)
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  76.  9
    Political authority and resistance to injustice: A Confucian perspective.Kevin K. W. Ip - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):81-101.
    Those who bear the burdens of injustice and oppression are entitled to act in ways contrary to existing laws and institutions to secure their own entitlements and those of others. This article aims to articulate a Confucian perspective on resistance against injustice. There are reasons for thinking that the notion of resistance is fundamentally at odds with Confucian political thought. In this article, I move beyond this simple conflict/compatibility model and explore the complex relationships between resistance and Confucianism. On one (...)
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  77.  8
    Political authority and resistance to injustice: A Confucian perspective.Kevin K. W. Ip - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):81-101.
    Those who bear the burdens of injustice and oppression are entitled to act in ways contrary to existing laws and institutions to secure their own entitlements and those of others. This article aims to articulate a Confucian perspective on resistance against injustice. There are reasons for thinking that the notion of resistance is fundamentally at odds with Confucian political thought. In this article, I move beyond this simple conflict/compatibility model and explore the complex relationships between resistance and Confucianism. On one (...)
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  78.  26
    Derrida's Wheel – The Circularity of Political (R)Evolutions.Elia R. G. Pusterla & Francesca Pusterla - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):102-122.
    This article investigates the relationship between political revolutions and the evolution of politics. It discusses the circularity within the concept of revolution through Jacques Derrida’s theory of sovereignty as particularly per Rogues – Two Essays on Reason and The Beast and the Sovereign. Derrida’s notions of wheel and ipseity display ontological prerogatives and evolutionary limits of political revolutions possibly coinciding with reversals hard to turn into linear evolutions, excluding rather than reaffirming circularity. Political revolutions show such incapacity to become evolutionary (...)
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  79.  4
    Derrida's Wheel – The Circularity of Political (R)Evolutions.Elia R. G. Pusterla & Francesca Pusterla - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):102-122.
    This article investigates the relationship between political revolutions and the evolution of politics. It discusses the circularity within the concept of revolution through Jacques Derrida’s theory of sovereignty as particularly per Rogues – Two Essays on Reason and The Beast and the Sovereign. Derrida’s notions of wheel and ipseity display ontological prerogatives and evolutionary limits of political revolutions possibly coinciding with reversals hard to turn into linear evolutions, excluding rather than reaffirming circularity. Political revolutions show such incapacity to become evolutionary (...)
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  80.  4
    Derrida's Wheel – The Circularity of Political (R)Evolutions.Elia R. G. Pusterla & Francesca Pusterla - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):102-122.
    This article investigates the relationship between political revolutions and the evolution of politics. It discusses the circularity within the concept of revolution through Jacques Derrida’s theory of sovereignty as particularly per Rogues – Two Essays on Reason and The Beast and the Sovereign. Derrida’s notions of wheel and ipseity display ontological prerogatives and evolutionary limits of political revolutions possibly coinciding with reversals hard to turn into linear evolutions, excluding rather than reaffirming circularity. Political revolutions show such incapacity to become evolutionary (...)
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  81.  3
    Derrida's Wheel – The Circularity of Political (R)Evolutions.Elia R. G. Pusterla & Francesca Pusterla - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):102-122.
    This article investigates the relationship between political revolutions and the evolution of politics. It discusses the circularity within the concept of revolution through Jacques Derrida’s theory of sovereignty as particularly per Rogues – Two Essays on Reason and The Beast and the Sovereign. Derrida’s notions of wheel and ipseity display ontological prerogatives and evolutionary limits of political revolutions possibly coinciding with reversals hard to turn into linear evolutions, excluding rather than reaffirming circularity. Political revolutions show such incapacity to become evolutionary (...)
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  82.  11
    Sartre’s imaginary and the problem of whiteness.Betty Jean Stoneman - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):3-17.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s failures in Black Orpheus have been widely and rightly explicated by a number of theorists, most notably Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire. Sartre has rightly been criticized for imposing a white gaze onto his reading of colonized African poetry. It would seem that his work offers us no tools for anti-racist work today. For this article, I read his failures in the text alongside his work in The Imaginary and Being and Nothingness to argue that we can learn (...)
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  83.  9
    Sartre’s imaginary and the problem of whiteness.Betty Jean Stoneman - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):3-17.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s failures in Black Orpheus have been widely and rightly explicated by a number of theorists, most notably Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire. Sartre has rightly been criticized for imposing a white gaze onto his reading of colonized African poetry. It would seem that his work offers us no tools for anti-racist work today. For this article, I read his failures in the text alongside his work in The Imaginary and Being and Nothingness to argue that we can learn (...)
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  84.  5
    Sartre’s imaginary and the problem of whiteness.Betty Jean Stoneman - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):3-17.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s failures in Black Orpheus have been widely and rightly explicated by a number of theorists, most notably Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire. Sartre has rightly been criticized for imposing a white gaze onto his reading of colonized African poetry. It would seem that his work offers us no tools for anti-racist work today. For this article, I read his failures in the text alongside his work in The Imaginary and Being and Nothingness to argue that we can learn (...)
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  85.  3
    Sartre’s imaginary and the problem of whiteness.Betty Jean Stoneman - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (1):3-17.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s failures in Black Orpheus have been widely and rightly explicated by a number of theorists, most notably Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire. Sartre has rightly been criticized for imposing a white gaze onto his reading of colonized African poetry. It would seem that his work offers us no tools for anti-racist work today. For this article, I read his failures in the text alongside his work in The Imaginary and Being and Nothingness to argue that we can learn (...)
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  86.  14
    For a negative hermeneutics: adorno, gadamer and critical consciousness.Vangelis Giannakakis - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    The present social-historical moment is marked by a sharp divide, a harrowing ‘communication breakdown’ between subject and object, between humanity and nature, between humanity and itself. This state of affairs pleads for the (re-)elaboration of a consciousness that resonates critically with the social, political and cultural realities of its time. This paper studies the lessons that can be drawn in this regard from the intersection between, on the one hand, Theodor W. Adorno’s ‘philosophical interpretation’ and his idea of an historically (...)
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  87.  15
    Brothers in arms: Adorno and Foucault on resistance.Giovanni Maria Mascaretti - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism:1-26.
    This article offers a comparative exploration of the practices of resistance Theodor Adorno and Michel Foucault champion against the structures of modern power their enquiries have the merit to illuminate and contest. After a preliminary examination of their views about the relationship between theory and praxis, I shall pursue two goals: first, I shall illustrate the limitations of Adorno’s negativist portrait of an ethics of resistance and contrast it with Foucault’s more promising notion of resistance as strategic counter-conduct, which in (...)
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  88. Reconsidering the ethics of cosmopolitan memory: In the name of difference and memories to-come.Zlatan Filipovic - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Departing from what Levey and Sznaider (2002) in their seminal work ‘Memory Unbound’ refer to as ‘cosmopolitan memory’ that emerges as one of the fundamental forms ‘collective memories take in the age of globalization’, this article will consider the underlying ethical implications of global memory formation that have yet to be adequately theorized. Since global disseminations of local memory cultures and the implicit canonization of its traumas are intimately related to the concept of archive, I will first focus on what (...)
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    The humanism of critical theory: The Frankfurt School’s ‘realer humanismus’.Alice Nilsson - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Theodor Adorno has been quoted as responding to the Humanist Union stating ‘I might possibly be willing to join if your club had been called an inhuman union, but I could not join one that calls itself “humanist”’. Adorno’s opposition to forms of humanism (both liberal and Marxist) which posit the existence of our humanity is reflected in readings of The Frankfurt Institute’s history such as that produced by Martin Jay. While this is the case, one of Adorno’s highly admired (...)
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