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  1. Islamophobia as Racialised Biopolitics in the United Kingdom.Tahir Abbas - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):497-511.
    This article provides a Foucauldian perspective on the racialised biopolitics of Islamophobia in the global north. It is argued that a pervasive, wide-ranging racialised logos is being used to unde...
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  2.  1
    Anti-Capital for the XXIst Century.Albena Azmanova - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):601-612.
    Using the temperate nature of recent social protest as its entry point, this analysis investigates the current state of liberal democracies as one in which the purported crisis of capitalism has en...
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  3.  6
    Some Notes on ‘Populism’.Jon Elster - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):591-600.
    The article criticizes the idea that we can find the ‘real meaning’ of populism and focuses instead on six psychological attitudes and political programmes that the term ‘populism’ can invoke: Lake...
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  4. How to Construct a Common and Consensual Multicultural Civic Discourse.Seán Golden - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):576-590.
    The 21st-century construction of a new Chinese political discourse faces the same dilemma that Chinese intellectuals first identified in the 19th century – how to make currently pre-eminent Eurocen...
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  5. Human Rights Amidst Despair in the Levant and the West.Micheline Ishay - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):613-623.
    In 2019, protests in the streets of Algeria and Sudan, Lebanon and Iraq brought back the fragrance of the Jasmine revolution. Can the pendulum swing back towards democracy and human rights in the M...
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  6.  1
    Democracy and Ethical Values From Islamic Perspective.Mohsen Kadivar - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):563-575.
    Inefficiency or inadequateness of Western liberal democracy at home is not the problematic of the rest because they have not experienced it yet! ‘Minimal democracy’ is the problematic of the reside...
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  7.  2
    Sources of Democracy: Rights, Trust and Solidarity.Volker Kaul - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):472-486.
    Three recently published reports show to what extent democracy is losing ground in a global context increasingly characterized by authoritarianism and populism. The argument this articles proposes is that the deplorable state of democracies around the world is due to the neglect of substantial characteristics and sources of democracy, which are above all trust and solidarity. Democracy has three different, but interrelated sources that are built upon each other according to a lexical order. A democracy is first based upon political (...)
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  8. The Culture of the National Liberation Movement and the Change Towards Democracy: The Case of North Africa.Mounir Kchaou - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):512-522.
    This article aims to analyse the cultural background of the political elites involved nowadays in the democratization’s process in North Africa. It argues that this process cannot succeed unless a...
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  9.  1
    Populist Multiculturalism: Are There Majority Cultural Rights?Alan Patten - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):539-552.
    Theories of multiculturalism explore whether minority cultural groups have rights and claims that limit the nation-building aims of the modern state and that protect a space in which minorities can...
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  10.  1
    Social Cohesion Without Electoral Democracy: The Case of China.Wang Pei & Daniel A. Bell - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):553-562.
    Democratic elections, whatever the flaws, tend to produce a sense of social cohesion as ordinary citizens, treated as equals, gather together to select their country’s political leaders. In China,...
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  11. Annotations.David Rasmussen, Volker Kaul & Alessandro Ferrara - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):471-471.
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  12.  2
    The Heavy Burden of Democracy: Where is Salvation? Democracy Between Perspective and Prohibited.Hussain Shaban - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):523-538.
    This report seeks to discuss the threats to liberal democracy and explore how to devise a new path towards democratic transition and the challenges faced: civil war, sectarian and religious conflicts, ethnic and national tensions, international terrorism and regional wars, and societal violence. The impact on democratic transformation, especially the sense of threat, whether literal or theoretical, led to the tendency of demagogic towards a populist outlook in pluralistic societies, generating reactions across other societies suffering from external alienation and internal (...)
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  13. Religious Pluralism: Essential or Challenge to Liberal Democracy?Mona Siddiqui - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (5):487-496.
    While religious pluralism is often regarded as a defining aspect of western liberal democracies, the mix of different religious and cultural identities has raised specific challenges for liberal de...
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  14.  2
    Reply to Chamberlain.Albena Azmanova - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (4):465-468.
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  15.  1
    Book Review: Capitalism on Edge: How Fighting Precarity Can Achieve Radical Change Without Crisis or Utopia. [REVIEW]James Chamberlain - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (4):452-464.
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  16.  10
    Universality Without Consensus: Jean-François Lyotard on Politics in Postmodernity.Javier Burdman - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (3):302-322.
    Lyotard’s diagnosis of a ‘postmodern condition’ has been repeatedly interpreted as a disavowal of the universal aspiration of political action and judgment. This article challenges this interpretation by showing that postmodernity involves an attempt to reconsider universality in such a way that it involves dissensus rather than consensus. I proceed by reconstructing Lyotard’s critique of the idea of consensus as a ground of political action and judgment, which in his view is based on a certain model of production of scientific (...)
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  17. Balibar, Citizenship, and the Return of Right Populism.Geoff Pfeifer - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (3):323-341.
    Arendt famously pointed out that only citizenship actually confers rights in the modern world. To be a citizen is to be one who has the ‘right to have rights’. Arendt’s analysis emerges out of her recognition that there is a contradiction between this way of conferring rights as tied to the nation-state system and the more philosophical and ethical conceptions of the ‘rights of man’ and notions of ‘human rights’ like those championed by thinkers such as Immanuel Kant who understands (...)
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  18.  12
    Rethinking the Sexual Contract: The Case of Thomas Hobbes.Lorenzo Rustighi - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (3):274-301.
    Feminist scholars have long debated on a key contradiction in the political theory of Thomas Hobbes: While he sees women as free and equal to men in the state of nature, he postulates their subjection to male rule in the civil state without any apparent explanation. Focusing on Hobbes’s construction of the mother–child relationship, this article suggests that the subjugation of the mother to the father epitomizes the neutralization of the ancient principle of ‘governance’, which he replaces with a novel (...)
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  19.  4
    Constraining Political Extremism and Legal Revolution.Benjamin A. Schupmann - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (3):249-273.
    Recently, extremist ‘populist’ parties have succeeded in obtaining large enough democratic electoral mandates both to legally make substantive changes to the law and constitution and to legally eliminate avenues to challenge their control over the government. Extremists place committed liberal democrats in an awkward position as they work to legally revolutionize their constitutions and turn them into ‘illiberal democracies’. This article analyses political responses to this problem. It argues that the twin phenomena of legal revolution and illiberal democracy reveal a (...)
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  20.  28
    Indeterminate Self: Subjectivity, Body and Politics in Zhuangzi.Peng Yu - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (3):342-366.
    In this article, I re-examine political subjectivity by way of looking at the canonical text of Chinese Daoist philosophy – Zhuangzi. I trace the course of how the body is conceived in Zhuangzi and discuss its relation with the unmaking of personhood. I then look into ways in which the body–self nexus in Zhuangzi gives rise to new conceptualization of political relations. I argue that, in Zhuangzi, the body is conceived as spontaneous and dispossessed. The body as such foregrounds the (...)
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  21.  5
    Normativity and Emotional Vulnerability.Carla Bagnoli - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):141-151.
    Are the emotions relevant for the theory of value and normativity? Is there a set of morally correct arrangements of emotions? Current debates are often structured as though there were only two theoretical options to approach these questions, a sentimentalist theory of some sort, which emphasizes the role of emotions in forming ethical behaviour and practical thought, and intellectualist rationalism, which denies that emotions can help at all in generating normativity and contributing to moral value, hence also denying that they (...)
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  22.  2
    Normativity, Volitional Capacities, and Rationality as a Form of Life.Gabriele De Anna - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):152-161.
    Contemporary neo-Aristotelianism attempts to ground normative constraints on action on the notion of human nature and this opens it to two main objections: Firstly, human nature seems to be too indeterminate to set constraints on action; secondly, it is unclear why knowledge of human nature should motivate agents. This essay considers the contribution that Wittgenstein’s notion of form of life can give in answering these challenges. It suggests that forms of life are not objects of analysis, but rather a new (...)
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  23.  8
    The Indispensability of the Manifest Image.Mario De Caro - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):162-172.
    It is very contentious whether the features of the manifest image have a place in the world as it is described by natural science. For the advocates of strict naturalism, this is a serious problem, which has been labelled ‘placement problem’. In this light, some of them try to show that those features are reducible to scientifically acceptable ones. Others, instead, argue that the features of the manifest image are mere illusions and, consequently, have to be eliminated from our ontology. (...)
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  24.  2
    Nature, Value, and Normativity: An Introduction.Mario De Caro & Gabriele De Anna - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):113-114.
    This brief introduction expounds the reasons behind the collection of essays entitled ‘Nature, Value and Normativity’. Political and social philosophers have usually a hard time finding a role for considerations about nature in their accounts of normativity, due to the risk of committing the naturalistic fallacy and/or running against people’s autonomy. Scepticism about appeals to nature in normative accounts of politics and society, however, seems bound to clash with the fact that nature constrains human action. The essays of the collection (...)
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  25.  18
    Against Realism: Hegel and Adorno on Philosophy’s Critical Role.Bernardo Ferro - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):183-202.
    Key representatives of the dialectical tradition, Hegel and Adorno conceived philosophy as a critical tool, directed both at the naive realism of ordinary reason and the more sophisticated realism of modern scientific discourse. For the two authors, philosophy’s main task is to question received ideas and practices and to expose their underlying contradictions, thereby enabling meaningful forms of cultural and political change. But while for Hegel this procedure takes the form of a systematic enquiry, leading from a spurious to a (...)
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  26.  5
    Wittgenstein on Ethics: Working Through Lebensformen.Juliet Floyd - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):115-130.
    In his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, Wittgenstein conveyed the idea that ethics cannot be located in an object or self-standing subject matter of propositional discourse, true or false. At the same time, he took his work to have an eminently ethical purpose, and his attitude was not that of the emotivist. The trajectory of this conception of the normativity of philosophy as it developed in his subsequent thought is traced. It is explained that and how the notion of a ‘form of life’ (...)
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  27.  11
    Why so Timely? Politics of Representation and its Entanglement in Presentism.Arda Güçler - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):224-246.
    What gives representation its democratic essence? The recent democratic theory literature, particularly spearheaded by Nadia Urbinati, defends representative mediation as a facilitator of ongoing democratic contestation and revision. While I agree with this agonistic defence, I take issue with how Urbinati construes it. For her, representative contestation works in the teleological sense of testing opinions over time and sublimating them into ideological forms as a safeguard against the threat of immediacy. This article locates the traces of such presentism within Urbinati’s (...)
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  28.  4
    Passions, Virtue, and Rational Life.John Hacker-Wright - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):131-140.
    Neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalists argue that moral norms are natural norms that apply to human beings. A central issue for neo-Aristotelians is to determine what belongs to the good human life; the question is complicated, since we take up a diversity of different lives, many of which seem good, and it seems unclear what the human species-characteristic life really is. The Aristotelian tradition gives some guidance on this question, however, because it describes us as rational animals with intellectual and appetitive powers; (...)
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  29.  14
    Machiavelli and the Virtues of Pessimism.Navid Hassanzadeh - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):203-223.
    In recent realist theory and more broadly, pessimism has tended to be treated as a problem or a liability for thought, limiting aspirations for political change and leading towards conservatism. In this article, I turn to Niccolò Machiavelli as a resource through which to theorize differently about the idea. I argue that pessimism in Machiavelli’s work can be associated with an effort to look candidly upon political affairs and to express scepticism towards complacency in thought and conduct. Such an approach, (...)
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  30.  1
    Neopragmatist Epistemology for Ethics and the Sciences: An Optimistic Sketch.Olaf L. Müller - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (2):173-182.
    Neopragmatist epistemology rejects any significant distinction between ethics and the sciences. The idea is that in ethics, we acquire knowledge in similar ways as in the natural sciences. Quine/duhem holism applies to both fields, which explains why the aim of reaching reflective equilibrium is prominent in many meta-ethical accounts: As in the sciences, our ethical system of belief is constrained by logic, observation, coherence, simplicity and parsimony. Whereas considerations of beauty are irrelevant in ethical epistemology, emotions play an essential role; (...)
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  31.  3
    Exile, Statelessness, and Migration: Response to My Critics.Seyla Benhabib - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):34-44.
    My new book, Exile, Statelessness, and Migration. Playing Chess With History From Hannah Arendt to Isaiah Berlin, considers the intertwined lives and work of Jewish intellectuals as they make their escape from war-torn Europe into new countries. Although the group which I consider, including Hannah Arendt, Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Judith Shklar, Albert Hirschman and Isaiah Berlin, have a unique profile as migrants because of their formidable education and intellectual capital, I argue that their lives are still exemplary for many (...)
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  32.  12
    The Unnoticed Monism of Judith Shklar’s Liberalism of Fear.Allyn Fives - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):45-63.
    Judith Shklar’s liberalism of fear, a political and philosophical standpoint that emerges in her mature work, has ostensibly two defining characteristics. It is a sceptical approach that puts cruelty first among the vices. For that reason, it is considered to be both set apart from mainstream liberalism, in particular the liberalism of J. S. Mill and John Rawls, but also an important source of influence for political realists and nonideal theorists. However, I argue here that, in putting cruelty first among (...)
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  33.  10
    Nihilism, Existentialism, – and Gnosticism? Reassessing the Role of the Gnostic Religion in Hans Jonas’s Thought.Fabio Fossa - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):64-90.
    Late antique Gnosticism and Heidegger’s Existentialism are usually counted among the main theoretical targets of Hans Jonas’s philosophy of life and responsibility, since they are supposed to share the dualistic and nihilistic attitude the philosopher deemed most mistaken and pernicious. In particular, Gnosticism is commonly understood as the exact opposite of what Jonas strove to accomplish in his work. However, I think it is simplistic to relegate Gnosticism to a merely antagonistic role in the development of Jonas’s philosophy. My claim (...)
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  34.  5
    Postnational Memory: Narrating the Holocaust and the Nakba.Nadim Khoury - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):91-110.
    At the heart of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict rages a struggle between two foundational tragedies: the Jewish Holocaust and the Palestinian Nakba. The contending ways in which both events are commemorated is a known feature of the conflict. Less known are marginal attempts to jointly deliberate on them. This article draws on such attempts to theorize a postnational conception of memory. Deliberating on the Holocaust and the Nakba, it argues, challenges the way nationalism structures ‘our’ and ‘their’ relationship to the past. (...)
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  35.  1
    Heliotropes.Robyn Marasco - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):3-9.
    A reflection on Seyla Benhabib’s Exile, Statelessness, and Migration, with a particular focus on her reconstruction of early critical theory and the ‘Benjaminian moment’ that links Hannah Arendt to Theodor Adorno.
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  36.  9
    The Other Within: Agency and Resistance Under Conditions of Exclusion.José Medina - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):18-24.
    This essay puts in conversation some of Seyla Benhabib’s insights about exiled, stateless and migrant populations with ongoing discussions in critical race theory about the racial exclusions of indigenous populations and populations of colour not only in the foundations of Western modern states but also in their contemporary functioning today. The essay locates these exclusions not only in the failures of states but also in their proper functioning, that is, in their very design and constitutive structures, focusing for this purpose (...)
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  37.  3
    Exit, Voice, Loyalty: The Case of the BDS.Adi Ophir - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):25-33.
    The essay proposes an unexpected alliance between two of the figures assembled in the impressive intellectual constellation Benhabib presents in her new book: Albert O. Hirschman and Judith Butler. Hirschman’s model of ‘exit, voice, loyalty’ is used to interpret and justify the Palestinian call for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions against Israel.
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  38.  1
    Jewishness and Jurisgenesis: On Seyla Benhabib’s Exile, Statelessness and Migration.Max Pensky - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (1):10-17.
    The postwar era saw a remarkable transformation of international law, from a loose arrangement of agreements designed to reduce collective action problems to a normative commitment to the inherent dignity of the individual person. Seyla Benhabib’s new book shows the extent to which this transformation was a matter of deeply personal experiences. Understanding this dialectic between the personal and the universal is crucial for understanding not just the genesis of contemporary normative international law, but also its prospects for survival. This (...)
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