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Carl Matheson [23]Carl A. Matheson [5]Carl Alan Matheson [1]
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Carl Alan Matheson
University of Manitoba
  1. Defending Musical Perdurantism.Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):59-69.
    If musical works are abstract objects, which cannot enter into causal relations, then how can we refer to musical works or know anything about them? Worse, how can any of our musical experiences be experiences of musical works? It would be nice to be able to sidestep these questions altogether. One way to do that would be to take musical works to be concrete objects. In this paper, we defend a theory according to which musical works are concrete objects. In (...)
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  2. Can a Musical Work Be Created?Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):113-134.
    Can a musical work be created? Some say ‘no’. But, we argue, there is no handbook of universally accepted metaphysical truths that they can use to justify their answer. Others say ‘yes’. They have to find abstract objects that can plausibly be identified with musical works, show that abstract objects of this sort can be created, and show that such abstract objects can persist. But, we argue, none of the standard views about what a musical work is allows musical works (...)
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  3.  55
    A Return to Musical Idealism.Wesley D. Cray & Carl Matheson - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (4):702-715.
    In disputes about the ontology of music, musical idealism—that is, the view that musical compositions are ideas—has proven to be rather unpopular. We argue that, once we have a better grip on the ontology of ideas, we can formulate a version of musical idealism that is not only defensible, but plausible and attractive. We conclude that compositions are a particular kind of idea: they are completed ideas for musical manifestation.
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  4. Defending 'Defending Musical Perdurantism'.Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):80-85.
    British Journal of Aesthetics (forthcoming Jan. 2008).
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  5. The Metaphysics of Jazz.James O. Young & Carl Matheson - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):125-133.
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  6. Fine Individuation.Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):113-137.
    Jerrold Levinson argues that musical works are individuated by their context of origin. But one could just as well argue that musical works are individuated by their context of reception. Moderate contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated by context of origin but not by context of reception, thus appears to be an unstable position. And, although a more thoroughgoing contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated both by context of origin and by context of reception, faces a (...)
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  7. Modality, Individuation, and the Ontology of Art.Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan - 2008 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):491-517.
    In 1988, Michael Nyman composed the score for Peter Greenaway’s film Drowning by Numbers (or did something that we would ordinarily think of as composing that score). We can think of Nyman’s compositional activity as a “generative performance” and of the sound structure that Nyman indicated (or of some other abstract object that is appropriately related to that sound structure) as the product generated by that performance (ix).1 According to one view, Nyman’s score for Drowning by the Numbers—the musical work—is (...)
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  8.  30
    Is the Naturalist Really Naturally a Realist?Carl Matheson - 1989 - Mind 98 (390):247-258.
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  9.  17
    Historicist Theories of Rationality.Carl Matheson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10.  34
    The Logical Impossibility of Collision.A. David Kline & Carl A. Matheson - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (242):509 - 515.
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  11. Why the No‐Miracles Argument Fails.Carl Matheson - 1998 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (3):263 – 279.
    The chief argument for scientific realism is the no-miracles argument, according to which the approximate truth of our current scientific theories can be inferred from their success through time. To date, anti-realist responses to the argument have been unconvincing, largely because of their anti-realistic presuppositions. In this paper, it is shown that realists cannot pre-emptively dismiss the problem of the underdetermination of theory by evidence, and that the no-miracles argument fails because it does nothing to dispel the threat posed by (...)
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  12.  73
    How the Laws of Physics Don't Even Fib.A. David Kline & Carl A. Matheson - 1986 - Psa 1986:33--41.
    The most recent challenge to the covering-law model of explanation (N. Cartwright, How the laws of Physics Lie) charges that the fundamental explanatory laws are not true. In fact explanation and truth are alleged to pull in different directions. We hold that this gets its force from confusing issues about the truth of the laws in the explanation and the precision with which those laws can yield an exact description of the event to be explained. In defending this we look (...)
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  13.  8
    Critical Notice.Carl Matheson - 1993 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):125-149.
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  14.  22
    Rejection Without Acceptance.Carl A. Matheson & A. David Kline - 1991 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (2):167 – 179.
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  15. How the Laws of Physics Don't Even Fib.A. David Kline & Carl A. Matheson - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:33-41.
    The most recent challenge to the covering-law model of explanation charges that the fundamental explanatory laws are not true. In fact explanation and truth are alleged to pull in different directions. We hold that this gets its force from confusing issues about the truth of the laws in the explanation and the precision with which those laws can yield an exact description of the event to be explained. In defending this we look at Cartwright's major case studies and sketch an (...)
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  16.  6
    Critical Notice: James O. Young, Art and Knowledge. London: Routledge 2001. Pp. 180.Carl Matheson & Evan Kirchhoff - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):575-598.
    In his Art and Knowledge, the distinguished Canadian philosopher of art, James O. Young, takes on the daunting task of defending his opening claim that ‘every item properly classified as a work of art can contribute to human knowledge’. His assertion is a general one, intended to apply to any and every prospective artwork, not merely to sub-genres like the moral novel or the ‘Shock-Headed Peter’ school of didactic bedtime terror-fest. Thus, according to Young, works such as The Well-Tempered Clavier (...)
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  17.  7
    Critical Notice. [REVIEW]Carl Matheson - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):463-489.
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  18.  44
    Chaos and Literature.Evan Kirchhoff & Carl Matheson - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (1):28-45.
  19.  25
    The Rational and the Social.Carl Matheson - 1993 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):125-149.
  20.  19
    Critical Notice.Carl Matheson & Evan Kirchhoff - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):575-598.
    In his Art and Knowledge, the distinguished Canadian philosopher of art, James O. Young, takes on the daunting task of defending his opening claim that ‘every item properly classified as a work of art can contribute to human knowledge’. His assertion is a general one, intended to apply to any and every prospective artwork, not merely to sub-genres like the moral novel or the ‘Shock-Headed Peter’ school of didactic bedtime terror-fest. Thus, according to Young, works such as The Well-Tempered Clavier (...)
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  21. Taylor Ic Francis. London and Washington. Dc 0269-172bc1992) 6: 1-#.Sonia Ryang, Warren Schmaus, Steven I. Miller, Carl Matheson, Harold Brown, Govindan Parayil, Steven Yearley & Stephen Turner - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6:102.
     
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  22.  26
    Consciousness and Synchronic Identity.Carl Matheson - 1990 - Dialogue 29 (4):523-530.
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  23.  12
    The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions. [REVIEW]Carl Matheson - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):463-489.
  24.  17
    Critical Notice of James O. Young, Art and Knowledge.Carl Matheson & Evan Kirchhoff - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):575-598.
    In his Art and Knowledge, the distinguished Canadian philosopher of art, James O. Young, takes on the daunting task of defending his opening claim that ‘every item properly classified as a work of art can contribute to human knowledge’. His assertion is a general one, intended to apply to any and every prospective artwork, not merely to sub-genres like the moral novel or the ‘Shock-Headed Peter’ school of didactic bedtime terror-fest. Thus, according to Young, works such as The Well-Tempered Clavier (...)
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  25.  10
    Brown's Rationality.Carl Matheson - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (1):35 – 43.
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  26.  3
    Observational Adequacy as Distinct From the Truth About Observables.Carl A. Matheson - 1998 - ProtoSociology 12:225-237.
  27.  11
    Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Literature: An Analytic Approach.David Davies & Carl Matheson (eds.) - 2008 - Broadview Press.
    What, if anything, distinguishes works of fiction such as Hamlet and Madame Bovary from biographies, news reports, or office bulletins? Is there a "right" way to interpret fiction? Should we link interpretation to the author's intention? Ought our moral unease with works that betray sadistic, sexist, or racist elements lower our judgments of their aesthetic worth? And what, when it comes down to it, is literature? The readings in this collection bring together some of the most important recent work in (...)
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  28. Carl Matheson.Carl Matheson & Winnipeg Manitoba Rut - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (1):35-43.
     
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  29. Does Scientific Realism Matter?Carl Alan Matheson - 1986 - Dissertation, Syracuse University
    The main claim of this work is that scientific realism is of no great use in the philosophy of science. I define scientific realism as the claim that truth is neither to be regarded as an epistemological concept nor to be relativized to conceptual scheme. After clarifying my definition and showing how it relates to other characterizations of realism, I turn to the possible uses of scientific realism in the philosophy of science. Proponents of scientific realism claim that only their (...)
     
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