17 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Frank W. Marlowe [14]Frank Marlowe [3]
  1. “Economic Man” in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies.Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger, Natalie Smith Henrich, Kim Hill, Francisco Gil-White, Michael Gurven, Frank W. Marlowe & John Q. Patton - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):795-815.
    Researchers from across the social sciences have found consistent deviations from the predictions of the canonical model of self-interest in hundreds of experiments from around the world. This research, however, cannot determine whether the uniformity results from universal patterns of human behavior or from the limited cultural variation available among the university students used in virtually all prior experimental work. To address this, we undertook a cross-cultural study of behavior in ultimatum, public goods, and dictator games in a range of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   40 citations  
  2.  8
    Household and Kin Provisioning by Hadza Men.Brian M. Wood & Frank W. Marlowe - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (3):280-317.
    We use data collected among Hadza hunter-gatherers between 2005 and 2009 to examine hypotheses about the causes and consequences of men’s foraging and food sharing. We find that Hadza men foraged for a range of food types, including fruit, honey, small animals, and large game. Large game were shared not like common goods, but in ways that significantly advantaged producers’ households. Food sharing and consumption data show that men channeled the foods they produced to their wives, children, and their consanguineal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  3.  8
    Allomaternal Care Among the Hadza of Tanzania.Alyssa N. Crittenden & Frank W. Marlowe - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (3):249-262.
    Cooperative child care among humans, where individuals other than the biological mother (allomothers) provide care, may increase a mother’s fertility and the survivorship of her children. Although the potential benefits to the mother are clear, the motivations for allomothers to provide care are less clear. Here, we evaluate the kin selection allomothering hypothesis using observations on Hadza hunter-gatherers collected in ten camps over 17 months. Our results indicate that related allomothers spend the largest percentage of time holding children. The higher (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4.  43
    Models of Decision-Making and the Coevolution of Social Preferences.Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger, Natalie Smith Henrich, Kim Hill, Francisco Gil-White, Michael Gurven, Frank W. Marlowe, John Q. Patton & David Tracer - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):838-855.
    We would like to thank the commentators for their generous comments, valuable insights and helpful suggestions. We begin this response by discussing the selfishness axiom and the importance of the preferences, beliefs, and constraints framework as a way of modeling some of the proximate influences on human behavior. Next, we broaden the discussion to ultimate-level (that is evolutionary) explanations, where we review and clarify gene-culture coevolutionary theory, and then tackle the possibility that evolutionary approaches that exclude culture might be sufficient (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  5.  7
    Mate Preferences Among Hadza Hunter-Gatherers.Frank W. Marlowe - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (4):365-376.
    The literature on human mate preferences is vast but most data come from studies on college students in complex societies, who represent a thin slice of cultural variation in an evolutionarily novel environment. Here, I present data on the mate preferences of men and women in a society of hunter-gatherers, the Hadza of Tanzania. Hadza men value fertility in a mate more than women do, and women value intelligence more than men do. Women place great importance on men’s foraging, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  6.  27
    Dynamics of Postmarital Residence Among the Hadza.Brian M. Wood & Frank W. Marlowe - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):128-138.
    When we have asked Hadza whether married couples should live with the family of the wife (uxorilocally) or the family of the husband (virilocally), we are often told that young couples should spend the first years of a marriage living with the wife’s family, and then later, after a few children have been born, the couple has more freedom—they can continue to reside with the wife’s kin, or else they could join the husband’s kin, or perhaps live in a camp (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  7.  7
    Selection for Delayed Maturity.Nicholas Blurton Jones & Frank W. Marlowe - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (2):199-238.
    Humans have a much longer juvenile period (weaning to first reproduction, 14 or more years) than their closest relatives (chimpanzees, 8 years). Three explanations are prominent in the literature. (a) Humans need the extra time to learn their complex subsistence techniques. (b) Among mammals, since length of the juvenile period bears a constant relationship to adult lifespan, the human juvenile period is just as expected. We therefore only need to explain the elongated adult lifespan, which can be explained by the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  8.  20
    Hadza Cooperation.Frank W. Marlowe - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (4):417-430.
    Strong reciprocity is an effective way to promote cooperation. This is especially true when one not only cooperates with cooperators and defects on defectors (second-party punishment) but even punishes those who defect on others (third-party, “altruistic” punishment). Some suggest we humans have a taste for such altruistic punishment and that this was important in the evolution of human cooperation. To assess this we need to look across a wide range of cultures. As part of a cross-cultural project, I played three (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  11
    Subsistence and the Evolution of Religion.Hervey C. Peoples & Frank W. Marlowe - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (3):253-269.
    We present a cross-cultural analysis showing that the presence of an active or moral High God in societies varies generally along a continuum from lesser to greater technological complexity and subsistence productivity. Foragers are least likely to have High Gods. Horticulturalists and agriculturalists are more likely. Pastoralists are most likely, though they are less easily positioned along the productivity continuum. We suggest that belief in moral High Gods was fostered by emerging leaders in societies dependent on resources that were difficult (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  6
    Toward a Reality-Based Understanding of Hadza Men’s Work.Brian M. Wood & Frank W. Marlowe - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (4):620-630.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  16
    The Patriarch Hypothesis.Frank Marlowe - 2000 - Human Nature 11 (1):27-42.
    Menopause is puzzling because life-history theory predicts there should be no selection for outliving one’s reproductive capacity. Adaptive explanations of menopause offered thus far turn on women’s long-term investment in offspring and grandoffspring, all variations on the grandmother hypothesis. Here, I offer a very different explanation. The patriarch hypothesis proposes that once males became capable of maintaining high status and reproductive access beyond their peak physical condition, selection favored the extension of maximum life span in males. Because the relevant genes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  12.  23
    The Nubility Hypothesis.Frank Marlowe - 1998 - Human Nature 9 (3):263-271.
    A new hypothesis is proposed to explain the perennially enlarged breasts of human females. The nubility hypothesis proposes that hominid females evolved protruding breasts because the size and shape of breasts function as an honest signal of residual reproductive value. Hominid females with greater residual reproductive value were preferred by males once reliable cues to ovulation were lost and long-term bonding evolved. This adaptation was favored because female-female competition for investing males increased once hominid males began to provide valuable resources.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  9
    Men's Reproductive Investment Decisions.Coren L. Apicella & Frank W. Marlowe - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (1):22-34.
    Using questionnaire data completed by 170 men, we examine variation in paternal investment in relation to the trade-off between mating and parenting. We found that as men’s self-perceived mate value increases, so does their mating effort, and in turn, as mating effort increases, paternal investment decreases. This study also simultaneously examined the influence on parental investment of men’s mating effort, men’s perception of their mates’ fidelity, and their perceived resemblance to their offspring. All predicted investment. The predictors of investment are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  8
    Sex‐Biased Migration in Humans: What Should We Expect From Genetic Data?Jon F. Wilkins & Frank W. Marlowe - 2006 - Bioessays 28 (3):290-300.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  8
    Good Genes and Parental Care in Human Evolution.Frank Marlowe - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):611-612.
    Prior to agriculture, human societies were small, with little variation for good genes sexual selection (GGSS) to work on. Across cultures, variation in paternal care makes the benefits of GGSS highly variable. Despite these caveats, female preferences for traits like male body symmetry suggest one reason for female short-term mating is gene shopping.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  18
    Sex Differences in Hadza Dental Wear Patterns.J. Colette Berbesque, Frank W. Marlowe, Ian Pawn, Peter Thompson, Guy Johnson & Audax Mabulla - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (3):270-282.
    Among hunter-gatherers, the sharing of male and female foods is often assumed to result in virtually the same diet for males and females. Although food sharing is widespread among the hunting and gathering Hadza of Tanzania, women were observed eating significantly more tubers than men. This study investigates the relationship between patterns of dental wear, diet, and extramasticatory use of teeth among the Hadza. Casts of the upper dentitions were made from molds taken from 126 adults and scored according to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Hunter-Gatherers and the Origins of Religion.Hervey C. Peoples, Pavel Duda & Frank W. Marlowe - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (3):261-282.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography