20 found
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  1.  83
    Public Health Ethics: Mapping the Terrain.James F. Childress, Ruth R. Faden, Ruth D. Gaare, Lawrence O. Gostin, Jeffrey Kahn, Richard J. Bonnie, Nancy E. Kass, Anna C. Mastroianni, Jonathan D. Moreno & Phillip Nieburg - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):170-178.
    Public health ethics, like the field of public health it addresses, traditionally has focused more on practice and particular cases than on theory, with the result that some concepts, methods, and boundaries remain largely undefined. This paper attempts to provide a rough conceptual map of the terrain of public health ethics. We begin by briefly defining public health and identifying general features of the field that are particularly relevant for a discussion of public health ethics.Public health is primarily concerned with (...)
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  2.  40
    Legal Authority to Preserve Organs in Cases of Uncontrolled Cardiac Death: Preserving Family Choice.Richard J. Bonnie, Stephanie Wright & Kelly K. Dineen - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):741-751.
    The gap between the number of organs available for transplant and the number of individuals who need transplanted organs continues to increase. At the same time, thousands of transplantable organs are needlessly overlooked every year for the single reason that they come from individuals who were declared dead according to cardio pulmonary criteria. Expanding the donor population to individuals who die uncontrolled cardiac deaths will reduce this disparity, but only if organ preservation efforts are utilized. Concern about potential legal liability (...)
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  3.  13
    Legal Authority to Preserve Organs in Cases of Uncontrolled Cardiac Death: Preserving Family Choice.Richard J. Bonnie, Stephanie Wright & Kelly K. Dineen - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):741-751.
    In this paper, we assume that organ donation policy in the United States will continue to be based on an opt-in model, requiring express consent to donate, and that families will continue to have the prerogative to make donation decisions whenever the deceased person has not recorded his or her own preferences in advance. The limited question addressed here is what should be done when a potential donor dies unexpectedly, without any recorded expression of his or her wishes at hand, (...)
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  4.  24
    Closing the Organ Gap: A Reciprocity-Based Social Contract Approach.Gil Siegal & Richard J. Bonnie - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):415-423.
    Organ transplantation has become a proven, cost-effective lifesaving treatment, but its promise is contingent on the number of available organs. The growing gap between the demand and supply results in unnecessary loss and diminished quality of life as well as high costs for surviving patients and health insurers. Twenty years after the enactment of the National Organ Transplantation Act, it is time to rethink the moral basis and overall design of organ transplantation policy. We propose a national plan for organ (...)
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  5.  6
    Closing the Organ Gap: A Reciprocity-Based Social Contract Approach.Gil Siegal & Richard J. Bonnie - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):415-423.
    Organ transplantation remains one of modern medicine's remarkable achievements. It saves lives, improves quality of life, diminishes healthcare expenditures in end-stage renal patients, and enjoys high success rates. Yet the promise of transplantation is substantially compromised by the scarcity of organs. The gap between the number of patients on waiting lists and the number of available organs continues to grow. As of January 2006, the combined waiting list for all organs in the United States was 90,284. Unfortunately, thousands of potential (...)
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  6.  28
    Personalized Disclosure by Information-on-Demand: Attending to Patients' Needs in the Informed Consent Process.Gil Siegal, Richard J. Bonnie & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):359-367.
    Obtaining informed consent has typically become a stylized ritual of presenting and signing a form, in which physicians are acting defensively and patients lack control over the content and flow of information. This leaves patients at risk both for being under-informed relative to their decisional needs and of receiving more information than they need or desire. By personalizing the process of seeking and receiving information and allowing patients to specify their desire for information in a prospective manner, we aim to (...)
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  7.  73
    Should a Personality Disorder Qualify as a Mental Disease in Insanity Adjudication?Richard J. Bonnie - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):760-763.
    The determinative issue in applying the insanity defense is whether the defendant experienced a legally relevant functional impairment at the time of the offense. Categorical exclusion of personality disorders from the definition of mental disease is clinically and morally arbitrary because it may lead to unfair conviction of a defendant with a personality disorder who actually experienced severe, legally relevant impairments at the time of the crime. There is no need to consider such a drastic approach in most states and (...)
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  8.  31
    Medical Ethics and the Death Penalty.Richard J. Bonnie - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (3):12-18.
  9.  20
    Reflections on Fairness in UNOS Allocation Policies.Gil Siegal & Richard J. Bonnie - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):28 – 29.
  10.  12
    Personalized Disclosure by Information-on-Demand: Attending to Patients' Needs in the Informed Consent Process.Gil Siegal, Richard J. Bonnie & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):359-367.
    In an explicit attempt to reduce physician paternalism and encourage patient participation in making health care decisions, the informed consent doctrine has become a foundational precept in medical ethics and health law. The underlying ethical principle on which informed consent rests — autonomy — embodies the idea that as rational moral agents, patients should be in command of decisions that relate to their bodies and lives. The corollary obligation of physicians to respect and facilitate patient autonomy is reflected in the (...)
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  11.  22
    Should a Personality Disorder Qualify as a Mental Disease in Insanity Adjudication?Richard J. Bonnie - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):760-763.
    In his accompanying article, Dr. Kinscherff has convincingly demonstrated why a categorical exclusion of personality disorders from the definition of “mental disease” in insanity defense adjudication is arbitrary, both conceptually and clinically. He explains his position in the context of a vignette involving a hypothetical defendant, Wilhelmina Sykes, charged with ramming her car into another car obstructing her path, causing serious injury to its driver. Dr. Kinscherff correctly points out that the determinative issue in applying the insanity defense in any (...)
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  12.  13
    Injury as a Field of Public Health: Achievements and Controversies.Richard J. Bonnie & Bernard Guyer - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):267-280.
    The mission of public health is to assure the conditions in which people can be healthy and to reduce the occurrence of death and disability attributable to disease and injury. From the distinctive perspective of public health, the target is the health of the population as a whole, with a particular concern for vulnerable populations within the whole. Although public health is grounded in science, the mission and perspective of the field are shaped by the ever-evolving values of the society. (...)
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  13.  3
    Injury as a Field of Public Health: Achievements and Controversies.Richard J. Bonnie & Bernard Guyer - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):267-280.
    The mission of public health is to assure the conditions in which people can be healthy and to reduce the occurrence of death and disability attributable to disease and injury. From the distinctive perspective of public health, the target is the health of the population as a whole, with a particular concern for vulnerable populations within the whole. Although public health is grounded in science, the mission and perspective of the field are shaped by the ever-evolving values of the society. (...)
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  14.  5
    Professional Liability and the Qyality of Mental Health Care.Richard J. Bonnie - 1988 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (3-4):229-239.
  15.  11
    Professional Liability and the Qyality of Mental Health Care.Richard J. Bonnie - 1988 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (3-4):229-239.
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  16.  8
    Soviet Psychiatry and Human Rights: Reflections on the Report of the U.S. Delegation.Richard J. Bonnie - 1990 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (1-2):123-131.
  17.  4
    Soviet Psychiatry and Human Rights: Reflections on the Report of the U.S. Delegation.Richard J. Bonnie - 1990 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (1-2):123-131.
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  18. Determination of Death by Neurologic Criteria in the United States: The Case for Revising the Uniform Determination of Death Act.Ariane Lewis, Richard J. Bonnie, Thaddeus Pope, Leon G. Epstein, David M. Greer, Matthew P. Kirschen, Michael Rubin & James A. Russell - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (S4):9-24.
    Although death by neurologic criteria is legally recognized throughout the United States, state laws and clinical practice vary concerning three key issues: the medical standards used to determine death by neurologic criteria, management of family objections before determination of death by neurologic criteria, and management of religious objections to declaration of death by neurologic criteria. The American Academy of Neurology and other medical stakeholder organizations involved in the determination of death by neurologic criteria have undertaken concerted action to address variation (...)
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  19.  22
    Reducing Underage Drinking: The Role of Law.James Mosher, Ralph Hingson, John F. Bunker & Richard J. Bonnie - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):38-41.
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  20.  10
    Reducing Underage Drinking: The Role of Law.James Mosher, Ralph Hingson, John F. Bunker & Richard J. Bonnie - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (S4):38-41.
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