Results for 'qualitative research'

998 found
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  1.  49
    Procedure Versus Process: Ethical Paradigms and the Conduct of Qualitative Research[REVIEW]Kristian Pollock - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):25-.
    Background Research is fundamental to improving the quality of health care. The need for regulation of research is clear. However, the bureaucratic complexity of research governance has raised concerns that the regulatory mechanisms intended to protect participants now threaten to undermine or stifle the research enterprise, especially as this relates to sensitive topics and hard to reach groups. Discussion Much criticism of research governance has focused on long delays in obtaining ethical approvals, restrictions imposed on (...)
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  2.  40
    Abductive Reasoning and Qualitative Research.Martin Lipscomb - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (4):244-256.
    Abduction, deduction and induction describe forms of reasoning. Deduction and induction are discussed in the nursing literature. However, abduction has been largely neglected by nurse scholars. In this paper it is proposed that abduction may play a part in qualitative data analysis – specifically, in the identification of themes, codes, and categories. Abduction is not, in research, restricted to or associated with any particular methodology. Nevertheless, situating abduction in qualitative research facilitates the identification of three interlinked (...)
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  3.  59
    Questioning the Use Value of Qualitative Research Findings.Martin Lipscomb - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):112-125.
    In this paper the use value of qualitative research findings to nurses in practice is questioned. More precisely it is argued that, insofar as action follows belief then, in all but the rarest of cases, the beliefs that nurses in practice can justifiably derive from or form on the basis of qualitative research findings do not sanction action in the world and the assumption, apparently widely held, that qualitative research can as evidence productively inform (...)
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  4.  32
    Estranged Familiars: A Deweyan Approach to Philosophy and Qualitative Research.Amy Shuffelton - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):137-147.
    This essay argues that philosophy can be combined with qualitative research without sacrificing the aims of either approach. Philosophers and qualitative researchers have articulated and supported the idea that human meaning-constructions are appropriately grasped through close attention to “consequences incurred in action,” in Dewey’s words. Furthermore, scholarship in both domains explores alternative possibilities to familiar constructions of meaning. The essay explains by means of a concrete example the approach I took to hybridizing these approaches. It describes an (...)
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  5. Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography.Iain Hay (ed.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides concise and accessible guidance on how to conduct qualitative research in human geography. It gives particular emphasis to examples drawn from social/cultural geography, perhaps the most vibrant area of inquiry in human geography over the past decade.
     
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  6.  68
    Reconsidering Constructivism in Qualitative Research.L. E. E. George - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):403-412.
    This article examines constructivism, a paradigm in qualitative research that has been propagated by Egon Guba, Yvonna Lincoln, and Norman Denzin. A distinction is made between whether the basic presuppositions of constructivism are credible compared to those of a competing paradigm and whether constructivism's beliefs are internally consistent. The latter approach, i.e. whether constructivism is internally consistent, is the focus of this article. The issues singled out for discussion are concerned with the constructivist ontology and epistemology. This article (...)
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  7.  34
    Critical Realism, Dialectics, and Qualitative Research Methods.John Michael Roberts - 2014 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):1-23.
    Critical realism has been an important advance in social science methodology because it develops a qualitative theory of causality which avoids some of the pitfalls of empiricist theories of causality. But while there has been ample work exploring the relationship between critical realism and qualitative research methods there has been noticeably less work exploring the relationship between dialectical critical realism and qualitative research methods. This seems strange especially since the founder of the philosophy of critical (...)
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  8.  30
    Making a Difference by Doing Applied Qualitative Research in Education: Three Case Studies.Radomír Masaryk & Lenka Sokolová - 2012 - Human Affairs 22 (4):492-509.
    The paper explores the possibilities of using applied qualitative research to help to achieve changes in the context of education. It presents three case studies: an evaluation of an educational software package which may be implemented nationally; an assessment of the impact of a 1:1 Technology Rich Learning Environment experimental project conducted in two Slovak elementary schools; and international comparative research on the curricula of psychology courses in secondary schools. The authors ask three questions: 1. does (...) research have the potential/resources/capacity to guide us in the process of making policy related decisions? 2. Does it have enough credibility in the eyes of the consumers—whether these are decision-makers themselves or a wider community that often plays a role in public decisions? 3. Could this type of work still count as academic inquiry? The discussion evolves around the reflection of the position of researchers in this type of research design, and the authors conclude that applied qualitative research could be the source of solid evidence for making decisions related to education—although this evidence is different to that provided by quantitative research. (shrink)
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  9.  28
    Reconsidering Constructivism in Qualitative Research.Cheu‐jey George Lee - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):403-412.
    This article examines constructivism, a paradigm in qualitative research that has been propagated by Egon Guba, Yvonna Lincoln, and Norman Denzin. A distinction is made between whether the basic presuppositions of constructivism are credible compared to those of a competing paradigm and whether constructivism's beliefs are internally consistent. The latter approach, i.e. whether constructivism is internally consistent, is the focus of this article. The issues singled out for discussion are concerned with the constructivist ontology and epistemology. This article (...)
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  10.  22
    Qualitative Research and Scientific Knowledge: Social Science in Post-Totalitarian Academia.Juraj Podoba - 2012 - Human Affairs 22 (4):591-602.
    The paper presents a critical analysis of the current state of qualitative research approaches in the social sciences and humanities within Slovak academic institutions. The author has been inspired by the metaphor of academic “barbaricum”. This analytical category is based on a model of the relationship between core and periphery, which has no clear function or organisational logic. From the scientific point of view, the core/centre should produce and innovate the theory, whereas the periphery should apply it. In (...)
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  11.  20
    Methodological Reflections on the Contribution of Qualitative Research to the Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Support Services.Sebastian Wäscher, Sabine Salloch, Peter Ritter, Jochen Vollmann & Jan Schildmann - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):237-245.
    This article describes a process of developing, implementing and evaluating a clinical ethics support service intervention with the goal of building up a context-sensitive structure of minimal clinical-ethics in an oncology department without prior clinical ethics structure. Scholars from different disciplines have called for an improvement in the evaluation of clinical ethics support services for different reasons over several decades. However, while a lot has been said about the concepts and methodological challenges of evaluating CESS up to the present time, (...)
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  12.  50
    Beginning Qualitative Research: A Philosophic and Practical Guide.Pamela S. Maykut - 1994 - Falmer Press.
    Although theoretically rigorous, the book is comprehensible to the beginning qualitative researcher.
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  13.  17
    The Power of Visual Approaches in Qualitative Inquiry: The Use of Collage Making and Concept Mapping in Experiential Research.Lynn Butler-Kisber & Tiiu Poldma - 2010 - Journal of Research Practice 6 (2):Article M18.
    The burgeoning interest in arts-informed research and the increasing variety of visual possibilities as a result of new technologies have paved the way for researchers to explore and use visual forms of inquiry. This article investigates how collage making and concept mapping are useful visual approaches that can inform qualitative research. They are experiential ways of doing/knowing that help to get at tacit aspects of both understanding and process and to make these more explicit to the researcher (...)
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  14.  52
    Fieldwork, Participation and Practice: Ethics and Dilemmas in Qualitative Research.Marlene de Laine - 2000 - Sage Publications.
    This timely and topical look at the role of ethics in fieldwork takes into account some of the major issues confronting qualitative researchers. The main purposes of this book are twofold: to promote an understanding of the harmful possibilities of fieldwork; and to provide ways of dealing with ethical problems and dilemmas. To these ends, examples of actual fieldwork are provided that address ethical problems and dilemmas, and posit ways of dealing with them.
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  15.  26
    Including Qualitative Research in Systematic Reviews: Opportunities and Problems.Mary Dixon‐Woods, Ray Fitzpatrick & Karen Roberts - 2001 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (2):125-133.
  16.  54
    The Role of Qualitative Research in Broadening the 'Evidence Base' for Clinical Practice.Rosaline S. Barbour Ma - 2000 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (2):155-163.
  17.  53
    Evaluating and Synthesizing Qualitative Research: The Need to Develop a Distinctive Approach.Rosaline S. Barbour & Michael Barbour - 2003 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (2):179-186.
  18.  45
    Seeking Consent to Genetic and Genomic Research in a Rural Ghanaian Setting: A Qualitative Study of the MalariaGEN Experience. [REVIEW]Paulina Tindana, Susan Bull, Lucas Amenga-Etego, Jantina de Vries, Raymond Aborigo, Kwadwo Koram, Dominic Kwiatkowski & Michael Parker - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):15-.
    Background: Seeking consent for genetic and genomic research can be challenging, particularly in populations with low literacy levels, and in emergency situations. All of these factors were relevant to the MalariaGEN study of genetic factors influencing immune responses to malaria in northern rural Ghana. This study sought to identify issues arising in practice during the enrolment of paediatric cases with severe malaria and matched healthy controls into the MalariaGEN study. Methods: The study used a rapid assessment incorporating multiple (...) methods including in depth interviews, focus group discussions and observations of consent processes. Differences between verbal information provided during community engagement processes, and consent processes during the enrolment of cases and controls were identified, as well as the factors influencing the tailoring of such information. Results: MalariaGEN participants and field staff seeking consent were generally satisfied with their understanding of the project and were familiar with aspects of the study relating to malaria. Some genetic aspects of the study were also well understood. Participants and staff seeking consent were less aware of the methodologies employed during genomic research and their implications, such as the breadth of data generated and the potential for future secondary research.Moreover, trust in and previous experience with the Navrongo Health Research Centre which was conducting the research influenced beliefs about the benefits of participating in the MalariaGEN study and subsequent decision-making about research participation. Conclusions: It is important to recognise that some aspects of complex genomic research may be of less interest to and less well understood by research participants and that such gaps in understanding may not be entirely addressed by best practice in the design and conduct of consent processes. In such circumstances consideration needs to be given to additional protections for participants that may need to be implemented in such research, and how best to provide such protections.Capacity building for research ethics committees with limited familiarity with genetic and genomic research, and appropriate engagement with communities to elicit opinions of the ethical issues arising and acceptability of downstream uses of genome wide association data are likely to be important. (shrink)
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  19. Qualitative Research in Midwifery and Childbirth Phenomenological Approaches.Gill Thomson, Fiona Dykes & Soo Downe (eds.) - 2011 - Routledge.
  20.  19
    Understandings of Genomic Research in Developing Countries: A Qualitative Study of the Views of MalariaGEN Participants in Mali.Karim Traore, Susan Bull, Alassane Niare, Salimata Konate, Mahamadou A. Thera, Dominic Kwiatkowski, Michael Parker & Ogobara K. Doumbo - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundObtaining informed consent for participation in genomic research in low-income settings presents specific ethical issues requiring attention. These include the challenges that arise when providing information about unfamiliar and technical research methods, the implications of complicated infrastructure and data sharing requirements, and the potential consequences of future research with samples and data. This study investigated researchers’ and participants’ parents’ experiences of a consent process and understandings of a genome-wide association study of malaria involving children aged five and (...)
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  21.  60
    Accessing Health Services Through the Back Door: A Qualitative Interview Study Investigating Reasons Why People Participate in Health Research in Canada. [REVIEW]Anne Townsend & Susan M. Cox - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):40.
    Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper (...)
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  22.  26
    Qualitative Research in Health Care: II. A Structured Review and Evaluation of Studies.Mary Boulton, Ray Fitzpatrick & Clare Swinburn - 1996 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (3):171-179.
  23.  32
    Seeking Consent to Genetic and Genomic Research in a Rural Ghanaian Setting: A Qualitative Study of the MalariaGEN Experience. [REVIEW]P. Tindana, S. Bull, L. Amenga-Etego, J. Vries, R. Aborigo, K. Koram, D. Kwiatkowski & M. Parker - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):15-15.
    Seeking consent for genetic and genomic research can be challenging, particularly in populations with low literacy levels, and in emergency situations. All of these factors were relevant to the MalariaGEN study of genetic factors influencing immune responses to malaria in northern rural Ghana. This study sought to identify issues arising in practice during the enrolment of paediatric cases with severe malaria and matched healthy controls into the MalariaGEN study.
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  24.  29
    A Philosophical Analysis of the General Methodology of Qualitative Research: A Critical Rationalist Perspective. [REVIEW]Abraham Rudnick - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (3):1-10.
    Philosophical discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research, such as that used in some health research, has been inductivist or relativist to date, ignoring critical rationalism as a philosophical approach with which to discuss the general methodology of qualitative research. This paper presents a discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research from a critical rationalist perspective (inspired by Popper), using as an example mental health research. The widespread endorsement of induction (...)
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  25.  25
    Photo Methods for Qualitative Research in Nursing: An Ontological and Epistemological Perspective.Patricia Hansen-Ketchum & Florence Myrick - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (3):205-213.
    Abstract The use of photo research methods is influenced by underlying ontological and epistemological assumptions. Variant assumptions about reality and knowledge converge to conceive a relationship between the knower and what can be known. These assumptions provide the rationale for decided ways of engaging participants in the process of scientific inquiry. In this paper, we examine how perspectives of realism and relativism may shape epistemological understandings and influence type and use of photo methods in qualitative research. Based (...)
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  26.  19
    Stakeholders Understanding of the Concept of Benefit Sharing in Health Research in Kenya: A Qualitative Study.Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Mike C. English - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):20.
    BackgroundThe concept of benefit sharing to enhance the social value of global health research in resource poor settings is now a key strategy for addressing moral issues of relevance to individuals, communities and host countries in resource poor settings when they participate in international collaborative health research.The influence of benefit sharing framework on the conduct of collaborative health research is for instance evidenced by the number of publications and research ethics guidelines that require prior engagement between (...)
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  27.  14
    The Labouring Sleepwalker: Evocation and Expression as Modes of Qualitative Educational Research.Paul Smeyers - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):407–423.
    This paper deals with the highly personal way an individual makes sense of the world in a way that avoids the pitfalls of the so‐called private language. For Wittgenstein following a rule can never mean just following another rule, though we do follow rules blindly. His idea of the ‘form of life’ elicits that ‘what we do’ refers to what we have learnt, to the way in which we have learnt it and to how we have grown to find it (...)
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  28.  12
    Ethics Review and Freedom of Information Requests in Qualitative Research.Kevin Walby & Alex Luscombe - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (4):1-15.
    Freedom of information requests are increasingly used in sociology, criminology and other social science disciplines to examine government practices and processes. University ethical review boards in Canada have not typically subjected researchers’ FOI requests to independent review, although this may be changing in the United Kingdom and Australia, reflective of what Haggerty calls ‘ethics creep’. Here we present four arguments for why FOI requests in the social sciences should not be subject to formal ethical review by ERBs. These four arguments (...)
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  29.  15
    Ethical Review and Qualitative Research Competence: Guidance for Reviewers and Applicants.Julie Mooney-Somers & Anna Olsen - 2017 - Research Ethics 13 (3-4):128-138.
    It is difficult to consider, describe or address the ethical issues particular to qualitative research without experience and understanding of the technicalities of qualitative methodologies. The Australian National Statement on the Ethical Conduct of Research Involving Humans charges researchers with a responsibility to demonstrate that they have the appropriate experience, qualifications and competence for their proposed research. Ethical review committees have the responsibility to judge claimed research competence. This article provides practical guidance to researchers (...)
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  30.  25
    Procedures of Recruiting, Obtaining Informed Consent, and Compensating Research Participants in Qatar: Findings From a Qualitative Investigation.Amal Killawi, Amal Khidir, Maha Elnashar, Huda Abdelrahim, Maya Hammoud, Heather Elliott, Michelle Thurston, Humna Asad, Abdul L. Al-Khal & Michael D. Fetters - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):9.
    Very few researchers have reported on procedures of recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating participants in health research in the Arabian Gulf Region. Empirical research can inform the debate about whether to adjust these procedures for culturally diverse settings. Our objective was to delineate procedures related to recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating health research participants in the extremely high-density multicultural setting of Qatar.
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  31. The Theory, Practice, and Evaluation of the Phenomenological Method as a Qualitative Research Procedure.Amedeo Giorgi - 1997 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 28 (2):235-260.
    This article points out the criteria necessary in order for a qualitative scientific method to qualify itself as phenomenological in a descriptive Husserlian sense. One would have to employ description within the attitude of the phenomenological reduction, and seek the most invariant meanings for a context. The results of this analysis are used to critique an article by Klein and Westcott , that presents a typology of the development of the phenomenological psychological method.
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  32. A Phenomenological Perspective on Certain Qualitative Research Methods.Amedeo Giorgi - 1994 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 25 (2):190-220.
    In this article the phenomonelogical approach to qualitative research is compared with certain other qualitative approaches following other paradigms. The thesis is that a deepened understanding of phenomenological philosophy can provide the alternative framework that many of these authors have been seeking. The comparison with other approaches is made in terms of theoretical and methodical consistency. Theoretically, the argument is that the situation known as "mixed discourse" exists because practitioners have not sufficiently freed themselves from the criteria (...)
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  33.  38
    Ethics in Qualitative Research: 'Vulnerability', Citizenship and Human Rights.Pamela Fisher - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (1):2-17.
    This paper poses questions regarding the ethical prioritisation in qualitative research studies on assessing a person's or a group's fitness to provide informed consent, arguing that this may have unwanted as well as desirable consequences, particularly in relation to rights of citizenship for socially marginalised populations who tend to be labelled vulnerable. Drawing on three theoretical perspectives (Arendt, Honneth and Bourdieu), it is suggested that the emphasis placed on a research participant's capacity to provide informed consent cannot (...)
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  34. Power, Subjectivity and Ethics in Qualitative Research.Robyn Dowling - 2000 - In Iain Hay (ed.), Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography. Oxford University Press. pp. 23--36.
     
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  35. The Question of Validity in Qualitative Research.Amedeo Giorgi - 2002 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 33 (1):1-18.
    It seems that many qualitative researchers have still not contextualized the role of validity in qualitative analysis.This article enumerates three factors that must be taken into account: The philosophy of science within which one works, the discipline to which one belongs, and the subfield of specialization that one pursues. Most researchers have encountered the question of validity within the context of empirical science, but validity does not have the same role within a phenomenological philosophy of science. Within the (...)
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  36.  9
    Phenomenology and Qualitative Research: Amedeo Giorgi's Hermetic Epistemology.John Paley - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (3):e12212.
    Amedeo Giorgi has published a review article devoted to Phenomenology as Qualitative Research: A Critical Analysis of Meaning Attribution. However, anyone reading this arti-cle, but unfamiliar with the book, will get a distorted view of what it is about, whom it is addressed to, what it seeks to achieve and how it goes about presenting its argu-ments. Not mildly distorted, in need of the odd correction here and there, but sys-tematically misrepresented. The article is a study in misreading. (...)
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  37. Abductive Analysis: Theorizing Qualitative Research.Iddo Tavory & Stefan Timmermans - 2014 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _Abductive Analysis_, Iddo Tavory and Stefan Timmermans provide a new navigational map for constructing empirically based generalizations in qualitative research. They outline an accessible way to think about observations, methods, and theories that nurtures theory-formation without locking it into predefined conceptual boxes. The authors view research as continually moving back and forth between a set of observations and theoretical generalizations. To craft theory is to then pitch one’s observations in relation to other potential cases, both within (...)
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  38. Writing in, Speaking Out: Communicating Qualitative Research Findings.Lawrence Berg & Juliana Mansvelt - 2000 - In Iain Hay (ed.), Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography. Oxford University Press.
  39.  42
    Elements of Risk in Qualitative Research.William E. Smythe & Thomas Hadjistavropoulos - 2001 - Ethics and Behavior 11 (2):163-174.
    Qualitative research occupies a useful and important role in social science inquiry. Nonetheless, when ethical issues surrounding this research are discussed, elements of risk may be neglected. Qualitative research often raises concerns about the protection of the confidentiality of not only the participants but also of 3rd parties mentioned in transcribed narratives. Moreover, we argue that, in some instances, qualitative research has considerable potential of inducing negative psychological states. We conclude by presenting a (...)
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  40. Ten Standard Objections to Qualitative Research Interviews.Steinar Kvale - 1994 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 25 (2):147-173.
    Qualitative research has tended to evoke rather stereotyped objections from the mainstream of social science. Ten standardized responses to the stimulus "qualitative research interview" are discussed: it is not scientific, not objective, not trustworthy, nor reliable, not intersubjective, not a formalized method, not hypothesis testing, not quantitative, not generalizable, and not valid. With the objections to qualitative interviews highly predictable, they may be taken into account when designing, reporting, and defending an interview study. As a (...)
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  41.  52
    Talking About Suicide: Confidentiality and Anonymity in Qualitative Research.S. Gibson, O. Benson & S. L. Brand - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012452684.
    While it is acknowledged that there is a need for more qualitative research on suicide, it is also clear that the ethics of undertaking such research need to be addressed. This article uses the case study of the authors’ experience of gaining ethics approval for a research project that asks people what it is like to feel suicidal to (a) analyse the limits of confidentiality and anonymity and (b) consider the ways in which the process of (...)
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  42. Genre-Appropriate Judgments of Qualitative Research.Justin Lee - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (3):316-348.
    Focusing on the production of lists of evaluative criteria has oversimplified our judgments of qualitative research. On the one hand, aspirations for global criteria applicable to “qualitative” or “interpretive” research have glossed over crucial analytic differences among specific types of inquiry. On the other hand, the methodological concern with appropriate ways of acquiring trustworthy data has led to an overly narrow proceduralism. I suggest that rational evaluations of analytic worth require the delineation of species of analytic (...)
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  43.  42
    Quantitative and Qualitative Research in Psychological Science.Katherine Nelson - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (3):263-272.
    The field of psychology has emphasized quantitative laboratory research as a defining character of its role as a science, and has generally de-emphasized qualitative research and theorizing throughout its history. This article reviews some of the effects of this emphasis in two areas, intelligence testing, and learning and memory. On one side, quantitative measurement produced the widely used IQ test but shed little light on the construct of intelligence and its role in human cognition. On the other (...)
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  44.  17
    Is the Qualitative Research Interview an Acceptable Medium for Research with Palliative Care Patients and Carers?Marjolein Gysels, Cathy Shipman & Irene J. Higginson - 2008 - BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):7-.
    BackgroundContradictory evidence exists about the emotional burden of participating in qualitative research for palliative care patients and carers and this raises questions about whether this type of research is ethically justified in a vulnerable population. This study aimed to investigate palliative care patients' and carers' perceptions of the benefits and problems associated with open interviews and to understand what causes distress and what is helpful about participation in a research interview.MethodsA descriptive qualitative study. The data (...)
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  45.  27
    A Messy Business: Qualitative Research and Ethical Review.Angus J. Dawson - 2006 - Clinical Ethics 1 (2):114-116.
    This paper argues that qualitative research is both useful and necessary, as it provides an essential means of gaining a richer understanding of patients' perceptions, social processes and meanings. In their paper in this edition of Clinical Ethics, Hallowell and Lawton raise many issues relating to the way that qualitative research is treated by RECs in the UK. In this paper I discuss just three key topics stimulated by their paper: the way that methodology relates to (...)
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  46. The Science of Qualitative Research.Martin Packer - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a unique examination of qualitative research in the social sciences, raising and answering the question of why we do this kind of investigation. Rather than offering advice on how to conduct qualitative research, it explores the multiple roots of qualitative research – including phenomenology, hermeneutics and critical theory – in order to diagnose the current state of play and recommend an alternative. The diagnosis is that much qualitative research today (...)
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  47.  24
    Toward a Social History of Qualitative Research.Gordana Jovanović - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (2):1-27.
    There are plausible academic as well as social indicators that qualitative research has become an indispensable part of the methodological repertoire of the social sciences. Relying upon the tenets of the qualitative approach which require a priority of subject matter over method and a necessary socio-historical contextualization, I reconstruct some aspects of a social history that have shaped the quantitative—qualitative dichotomy and the quantitative imperative; these include modern individualism, monological rationality, manufacture operating on the grounds of (...)
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  48.  4
    Qualitative Research Methods and Evidential Reasoning.Corrado Matta - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (5):385-412.
    This article discusses the concept of evidential reasoning in the context of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. A conceptualization of qualitative evidential reasoning is proposed...
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  49.  6
    Non-Expert Views of Compassion: Consensual Qualitative Research Using Focus Groups.Jana Koróniová, Júlia Halamová & Martina Baránková - 2019 - Human Affairs 29 (1):6-19.
    Although the research on compassion is growing, there is a lack of knowledge about how non-expert people perceive compassion. Therefore, the aim of the study was to explore compassion from the perspective of non-experts. Our sample consisted of 56 non-expert participants in 10 focus groups and we conducted a Consensual Qualitative Research analysis with two members of a core team and one auditor. In general, compassion was described as a mixture of non-specified positive emotions and specified negative (...)
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  50.  9
    Consensual Qualitative Research on Free Associations for Compassion and Self-Compassion.Júlia Halamová, Martina Baránková, Bronislava Strnádelová & Jana koróniová - 2018 - Human Affairs 28 (3):253-270.
    The aim of our study was to explore the first three associations for the following two stimulus words: compassion and self-compassion. In addition, we were interested in whether the participants would conceptualise these words more in terms of emotions, cognitions, or behaviours. The sample consisted of 151 psychology students. A consensual qualitative research approach was adopted. Three members of the core team and an auditor analysed the free associations of compassion and self-compassion. The data showed that there were (...)
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