About this topic
Summary Edmund Husserl worked on various topics that are currently investigated in the philosophy of mind, e.g., self-consciousness, time consciousness, and perceptual and other kinds of intentionality--and philosophers of mind draw upon Husserl’s work. We may therefore say that Husserl had a kind of philosophy of mind, with the distinguishing feature of being developed thoroughgoingly from the first-person perspective. The Husserlian philosophy of mind is a study of how there arise, or are “constituted,” in consciousness, perceptual and other objectivity, as well as one’s own and the others’ embodied selves. Guided by these rather general, fundamental concerns, its scope mostly excludes issues and discussions where the philosophical interest is focused more narrowly, e.g., on the foundations of a specific scientific discipline, or on a different branch of philosophy that presupposes an investigation of the mind.
Key works There are a number of recent collections of papers dealing, either in whole or in significant part, with aspects of what might be called the Husserlian philosophy of mind, or exploring the interconnections between Husserl's phenomenology and the analytic philosophy of mind: Smith & Thomasson 2005, Frank & Weidtmann 2010, Mayer et al 2011, Embree & Nenon 2012, Centrone 2013, Ierna et al 2010, Vandevelde & Luft 2010, and Welton 2003. Also, Beyer 2000 and Szanto 2012 are two recent monographs discussing the relations between Husserlian phenomenology and the analytic philosophy of mind (and language).
Introductions See Beyer 2003 for an encyclopedia article on Husserl's philosophy, including themes from the philosophy of mind. For a brief, introductory discussion of Husserlian phenomenology vis-a-vis the analytic philosophy of mind, see Smith & Thomasson 2003.
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  1. What is Phenomenology? [REVIEW]B. A. - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (2):399-400.
  2. The Think Aloud Method in Descriptive Research.Christopher M. Aanstoos - 1983 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 14 (1):243-266.
  3. Harmon M. Chapman 1901-1973.Raziel Abelson - 1973 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 47:214 - 215.
  4. The Interpermeation of Self and World: Empirical Research, Existential Phenomenology, and Transpersonal Psychology.Will W. Adams - 1999 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 30 (2):39-67.
    This study, based upon empirical phenomenological research, explores an essential phenomenon of human existence: the interpermeating communion of self and world. In interpermeation, the supposed separation of self and world is transcended. The being, energy, life, and meaning of the world "flow into" one's self and become integrated as part of who one is; simultaneously, one's being, consciousness, awareness, and self "flow into" the world and become part of the world. Conscious of interpermeation, we tend to understand ourselves and reality (...)
  5. Aurel Codoban: On Comprehension and Critical Reflection.Stefan Afloroaei - 2008 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (21):112-119.
  6. From Neo-Kantianism to Phenomenology. Emil Lask’s Revision of Transcendental Philosophy: Objectivism, Reduction, Motivation.Bernardo Ainbinder - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:433-456.
    Recently, Emil Lask’s work has been the object of renewed interest. As it has been noted, Lask’s work is much closer to phenomenology than that of his fellow Neo-Kantians. Many recent contributions to current discussions on this topic have compared his account of logic to Husserl’s. Less attention has been paid to Lask’s original metaphilosophical insights. In this paper, I explore Lask’s conception of transcendental philosophy to show how it led him to a phenomenological conversion. Lask found in Husserl’s Logical (...)
  7. From Neo-Kantianism to Phenomenology. Emil Lask’s Revision of Transcendental Philosophy.Bernardo Ainbinder - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:433-456.
    Recently, Emil Lask’s work has been the object of renewed interest. As it has been noted, Lask’s work is much closer to phenomenology than that of his fellow Neo-Kantians. Many recent contributions to current discussions on this topic have compared his account of logic to Husserl’s. Less attention has been paid to Lask’s original metaphilosophical insights. In this paper, I explore Lask’s conception of transcendental philosophy to show how it led him to a phenomenological conversion. Lask found in Husserl’s Logical (...)
  8. In Continuity: A Reflection on the Passive Synthesis of Sameness.Francisco Salto Alemany - 1991 - Analecta Husserliana 34:195.
  9. Abstract: “Brute Being” and Hyletic Phenomenology.Angela Ales Bello - 2008 - Chiasmi International 10:161-161.
  10. Debiran, M and Phenomenology.Iw Alexander - 1970 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 1 (1):24-37.
  11. What is Phenomenology.Iw Alexander - 1970 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 1 (1):3-3.
  12. From Intersubjectivity to Interinstrumentality: The Example of Surface Science.Catherine Allamel-Raffin - unknown
    My aim is to show how a strategy used in the experimental sciences, which I name “interinstrumentality”, can minimize the role of sociological factors when one tries to understand how the debates about the interpretation of data come to an end. To defend this view, two examples are presented. The first is historical – the invention of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope – and the second is collected during an ethnographic study in a surface science laboratory. I would like to emphasize (...)
  13. Fundamental Paradigms for the Study of Intersubjectivity.Jeffner Allen - 1978 - Research in Phenomenology 8 (1):263-272.
  14. Sporting Embodiment: Sports Studies and the (Continuing) Promise of Phenomenology.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - unknown
    Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under-realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide-ranging, multi-stranded, and interpretatively contested perspective, phenomenology in general has been taken up and utilised in very different ways within different disciplinary fields. (...)
  15. Cognitive Approach to Model-Based Sciences.Ebrahim Oshni Alvandi & Majeed Akbari Dehagi - 2010 - International Journal on Humanistic Ideology 3 (1):153-165.
  16. Culture in a Phenomenological Perspective.Lourdes Gordillo Alvarez-valdÉs - 1993 - Analecta Husserliana 40:63.
  17. Neo-Kantianism and the Roots of Anti-Psychologism.R. Lanier Anderson - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):287-323.
  18. The Phenomenological Foundations for Methodology Ii: Experimental Phenomenological Psychology.Wayne K. Andrew - 1986 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 17 (1):77-97.
  19. The Phenomenological Foundations for Methodology Ii: Experimental Phenomenological Psychology.Wayne K. Andrew - 1986 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 17 (2):77-97.
  20. Présentation.Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2014 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 108 (1):3.
  21. Toward a Phenomenology of Rational Action.Ian H. Angus - 1979 - Man and World 12 (3):298-321.
  22. Self-Consciousness and the Right to Life.David Annis - 1975 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):123-128.
  23. Intention. --.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1957 - Blackwell.
  24. The New Century: Bergsonism, Phenomenology and Responses to Modern Science.Keith Ansell-Pearson & Alan D. Schrift - 2013 - Routledge.
    This volume covers the period between the 1890s and 1930s, a period that witnessed revolutions in the arts and society which set the agenda for the rest of the century. In philosophy, the period saw the birth of analytic philosophy, the development of new programmes and new modes of inquiry, the emergence of phenomenology as a new rigorous science, the birth of Freudian psychoanalysis, and the maturing of the discipline of sociology. This period saw the most influential work of a (...)
  25. The New Century: Bergsonism, Phenomenology and Responses to Modern Science.Keith Ansell-Pearson & Alan D. Schrift - 2010 - In Alan D. Schrift (ed.), The History of Continental Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    This volume covers the period between the 1890s and 1930s, a period that witnessed revolutions in the arts and society which set the agenda for the rest of the century. In philosophy, the period saw the birth of analytic philosophy, the development of new programmes and new modes of inquiry, the emergence of phenomenology as a new rigorous science, the birth of Freudian psychoanalysis, and the maturing of the discipline of sociology. This period saw the most influential work of a (...)
  26. On Speaking: A Phenomenological Recovering of a Forgotten Sense.Corey Anton - 1997 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 30 (2):176 - 189.
  27. The Call “Back to the Things Themselves” and the Notion of Phenomenology.Ziri on Q. Antonio - 2006 - Husserl Studies 22:29-51.
  28. The Cartesian Paradigm of First Philosophy: A Critical Appreciation From the Perspective of Another (the Next?) Paradigm.Karl-Otto Apel - 1998 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 6 (1):1 – 16.
    There are several paradigms of 'first philosophy' (e.g. Aristotle, Descartes). A third paradigm of first philosophy is transcendental pragmatics or transcendental semiotics (exemplified by Peirce and Wittgenstein). Husserl correctly grasped that Descartes inaugurated first philosophy in the sense of a transcendental inquiry into the foundations of absolute knowledge. But Husserl's retrieval of Descartes remains within the second paradigm in that it ignores the role of language as a condition of the possibility of objectively constituted knowledge. I propose to re-examine Descartes's (...)
  29. The Things Themselves in the Light of the New Phenomenology.Iulian Apostolescu - 2016 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 20 (1):230-236.
  30. Transcendental Phenomenology.Richard E. Aquila - 1991 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (4):856-857.
  31. Immanence and Transcendence: A Reply to Prof. Alexander.M. C. D' Arcy - 1926 - Hibbert Journal 25:466.
  32. Proyecto y Performatividad En Terapia Guestáltica.Roberto Aristegui - 2000 - Cinta de Moebio 7.
    In this essay, the author tries to decipher the linguistics usages of gestaltic therapy, through a mixed analysis from both a perspective of the theory of talking acts (Searle) and the perspective of the phenomenological dimension of the project of Schutz.
  33. Intersubjective Intentionality.Edward G. Armstrong - 1977 - Midwestern Journal of Philosophy 5:1-11.
  34. The Role of the Body in the Constitutive Phase of Knowledge.Anne Freire Ashbaugh - 1980 - Man and World 13 (2):233-240.
  35. Contingencies of the Lifeworld: Phenomenological Psychology From Sheffield, England.P. D. Ashworth - 2003 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 34 (2).
  36. Equivocal Alliances of Phenomenological Psychologists.P. D. Ashworth - 1981 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 12 (1):1-31.
  37. Equivocal Alliances of Phenomenological Psychologists.P. D. Ashworth - 1981 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 12 (2):1-31.
  38. An Approach to Phenomenological Psychology: The Contingencies of the Lifeworld.Peter Ashworth - 2003 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 34 (2):145-156.
  39. Empirical Phenomenology: A Qualitative Research Approach (The Cologne Seminars).P. Aspers - 2009 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 9 (2):1-12.
    This paper introduces the philosophical foundation and practical application of empirical phenomenology in social research. The approach of empirical phenomenology builds upon the phenomenology of the philosophers Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger and the sociologist Alfred Schütz, but considers how their more philosophical and theoretical insights can be used in empirical research. It aims at being practically useful for anyone doing qualitative studies and concerned about safeguarding the perspective of those studied. The main idea of empirical phenomenology is that scientific (...)
  40. Temporality and Asperger's Syndrome. Assumpção Jr, Patricia Ribeiro Zukauskas & Nava Silton - 2009 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (1):85-106.
  41. Ricouer on Objectivity: Between Phenomenology and the Natural Sciences.Kim Atkins - 2002 - Philosophy Today 46 (4):384-395.
  42. Husserl on Signification and Object.John E. Atwell - 1969 - American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (4):312 - 317.
  43. Introduction to the Schutz Interview.Mie Augier & Roger Koppl - 2011 - Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Lifeworldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science:15-24.
  44. The Paradox of Human Life in the Thought of Miguel de Unamuno in Man's Self-Interpretation-in-Existence: Phenomenology and Philosophy of Life. Introducing the Spanish Perspective.M. Avelina Cecilia - 1990 - Analecta Husserliana 29:19-35.
  45. Transcendence and Immanence. Philosophy and Theology in a Changing World. B. - 1979 - Philosophy and History 12 (2):157-157.
  46. Descriptive Metaphysics and Phenomenology.Kalyankumar Bagchi - 1980 - Prajñā.
  47. Phenomenological Community and Integrative Social Agency: Critique of a Phenomenological Concept of Inter-Subjectivity.Zsolt Bagi - 2014 - Filozofija I Društvo 25 (2):5-18.
  48. Phenomenology and the Ethical Possibility of Differences: Critical Remarks on a Recent Answer to an Old Questions.Sorin Baiasu - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (2):204 - 218.
  49. Experienced Object, Interpretative Context, and Mythical Investiture.Edward G. Ballard - 1976 - Research in Phenomenology 6:105.
  50. The Nature of the Object as Experienced.Edward G. Ballard - 1976 - Research in Phenomenology 6 (1):105-138.
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