Search results for 'Conflict of Interest' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Joshua Fogel & Hershey H. Friedman (2008). Conflict of Interest and the Talmud. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):237 - 246.score: 729.0
    A core value of Judaism is leading an ethical life. The Talmud, an authoritative source on Jewish law and tradition, has a number of discussions that deal with honesty in business and decision-making. One motive that can cause individuals to be unscrupulous is the presence of a conflict of interest. This paper will define, discuss, and review five Talmudic concepts relevant to conflict of interest. They are (1) Nogea B’Davar (being an interested party), (2) V’hiyitem N’keyim (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Sarah Winch & Michael Sinnott (2011). Toward a Sociology of Conflict of Interest in Medical Research. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):389-391.score: 729.0
    Toward a Sociology of Conflict of Interest in Medical Research Content Type Journal Article Category Case Studies Pages 389-391 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9332-0 Authors Sarah Winch, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia 4072 Michael Sinnott, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia 4072 Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 4.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Marie-Josée Potvin (2012). The Strange Case of Dr. B and Mr. Hide: Ethical Sensitivity as a Means to Reflect Upon One's Actions in Managing Conflict of Interest. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):225-227.score: 729.0
    The Strange Case of Dr. B and Mr. Hide: Ethical Sensitivity as a Means to Reflect Upon One’s Actions in Managing Conflict of Interest Content Type Journal Article Category Case Studies Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11673-012-9360-4 Authors Marie-Josée Potvin, Programmes de bioéthique, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3J7 Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Bryn Williams-Jones & Chris MacDonald (2008). Conflict of Interest Policies at Canadian Universities: Clarity and Content. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):79-90.score: 729.0
    Discussions of conflict of interest (COI) in the university have tended to focus on financial interests in the context of medical research; much less attention has been given to COI in general or to the policies that seek to manage COI. Are university COI policies accessible and understandable? To whom are these policies addressed (faculty, staff, students)? Is COI clearly defined in these policies and are procedures laid out for avoiding or remedying such situations? To begin tackling these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Elise Smith (2012). Toward a Postmodernist View of Conflict of Interest. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):223-224.score: 729.0
    Toward a Postmodernist View of Conflict of Interest Content Type Journal Article Category Case Studies Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11673-012-9359-x Authors Elise Smith, Doctorat en sciences humaines appliquées, option bioéthique, Programmes de bioéthique, Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3J7 Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nancy J. Crigger (2009). Towards Understanding the Nature of Conflict of Interest and its Application to the Discipline of Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):253-262.score: 720.0
    Most incidences of dishonesty in research, financial investments that promote personal financial gain, and kickback scandals begin as conflicts of interest (COI). Research indicates that healthcare professionals who maintain COI relationships make less optimal and more expensive patient care choices. The discovery of COI relationships also negatively impact patient and public trust. Many disciplines are addressing this professional issue, but little work has been done towards understanding and applying this moral category within a nursing context. Do COIs occur in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Wendy Baldwin (2002). Conflict of Interest and its Significance in Science and Medicine Warsaw, Poland, 5–6 April, 2002. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):469-475.score: 720.0
    This article summarizes the April 5–6, 2002 conference on Conflict of Interest and Its Significance in Science and Medicine. Several themes are identified and addressed, including the globalization of science, the widespread presence of conflicts, the increased interest and involvement in conflict of interest by a number of organizations, the difference between academic research and research conducted by industry, and the tension between science and medicine. At the heart of the matter lies objectivity in research (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Elizabeth A. Boyd & Lisa A. Bero (2007). Defining Financial Conflicts and Managing Research Relationships: An Analysis of University Conflict of Interest Committee Decisions. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):415-435.score: 720.0
    Despite a decade of federal regulation and debate over the appropriateness of financial ties in research and their management, little is known about the actual decision-making processes of university conflict of interest (COI) committees. This paper analyzes in detail the discussions and decisions of three COI committees at three public universities in California. University committee members struggle to understand complex financial relationships and reconcile institutional, state, and federal policies and at the same time work to protect the integrity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Dr Imogen Evans (2002). Conflict of Interest: The Importance of Potential. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):393-396.score: 720.0
    The UK Medical Research Council (MRC) takes the issue of conflict of interest very seriously. The overall aim is to preserve a climate in which personal and organisational innovation can flourish while ensuring that potential conflicts are disclosed and identified and conflicts are either avoided or managed with integrity. The approach needs to encompass the MRC’s various responsibilities and the levels at which conflicts might arise: MRC staff (scientists and administrators); the governing Council; research Boards and committees; external (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Nils Hasselmo (2002). Individual and Institutional Conflict of Interest: Policy Review by Research Universities in the United States. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):421-427.score: 720.0
    This paper is a discussion of efforts to manage real and potential conflicts of interest in university research in the United States. The focus is on the report by an Association of American Universities (AAU) task force that addresses both individual and institutional conflict of interest issues.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Maurizio Salvi (2003). Conflict of Interest in Biomedical Research: A View From Europe. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (1):101-108.score: 720.0
    In this paper I address the conflict of interest (CoI) issue from a legal point of view at a European level. We will see that the regulatory framework that exists in Europe does state the need for the independence of ethics committee involved in authorisation of research and clinical trials. We will see that CoI is an element that has to be closely monitored at National and International level. Therefore, Member States and Newly Associated States do have to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Professor Bozidar Vrhovac (2002). Conflict of Interest in Croatia: Doctors with Dual Obligations. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):309-316.score: 720.0
    There is an emerging awareness of the possibility of conflicts of interest in the practice of medicine in Croatia. The paper examines areas within the medical profession where conflicts of interest can and have occurred, probably not only in Croatia. Particularly addressed are situations when a doctor may have dual obligations and how independent ethics committees can help in decreasing the influence of a conflict of interest. The paper also presents extracts from the Croatian Code of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Anton Oleinik (2013). Conflict(s) of Interest in Peer Review: Its Origins and Possible Solutions. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-21.score: 705.0
    Scientific communication takes place at two registers: first, interactions with colleagues in close proximity—members of a network, school of thought or circle; second, depersonalised transactions among a potentially unlimited number of scholars can be involved (e.g., author and readers). The interference between the two registers in the process of peer review produces a drift toward conflict of interest. Three particular cases of peer review are differentiated: journal submissions, grant applications and applications for tenure. The current conflict of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Sally Gunz, John McCutcheon & Frank Reynolds (2009). Independence, Conflict of Interest and the Actuarial Profession. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):77 - 89.score: 697.0
    The actuarial profession has a long history of providing critical expertise to society. The services delivered are some of the most complex and mysterious to outsiders of all professions but little has been written about the professional responsibilities of actuaries in the academic literature beyond that of the profession itself. This paper makes the case that the issues surrounding professional independence of actuaries are, in principle, similar to those that faced the audit profession before the scandals and resultant regulatory changes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Akram Heidari, Seyyed Hassan Adeli, Shiva Mehravaran & Fariba Asghari (2012). Addressing Ethical Considerations and Authors' Conflict of Interest Disclosure in Medical Journals in Iran. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):457-462.score: 697.0
    The purpose of this study was to examine how ethical approval and competing interests are addressed by medical journals in Iran. In a cross-sectional study, 151 journals accredited by the Publications Commission of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education were reviewed. Data collection was carried out by assessing journal guidelines and conducting structured phone interviews with journal managers, focusing on how ethical considerations and conflicts of interest (COI) are addressed. Overall, 135 of the 151 journals (89.4 percent) examined (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Paul J. Friedman (2002). The Impact of Conflict of Interest on Trust in Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):413-420.score: 688.0
    Conflicts of interest have an erosive effect on trust in science, damaging first the attitude of the public toward scientists and their research, but also weakening the trusting interdependence of scientists. Disclosure is recognized as the key tool for management of conflicts, but rules with sanctions must be improved, new techniques for avoidance of financial conflicts by alternative funding of evaluative research must be sought, and there must be new thinking about institutional conflicts of interest. Our profession is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Professor Arvo Tikk (2002). Conflict of Interest in Medical Research in Estonia. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):317-318.score: 688.0
    An area where conflicts of interest can take place in Estonia is in the conduct of clinical trials. The paper lists the main areas where such conflicts of interest can occur. The author also briefly discusses Estonia’s current position with regard to regulating genetic information and the commencement of the Estonian Genome Project.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Aamir M. Jafarey (2002). Conflict of Interest Issues in Informed Consent for Research on Human Subjects: A South Asian Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):353-362.score: 666.0
    Health research for progress in the control and conquest of disease afflicting man is unquestionable. Concerns arise when motives other than the advancement of scientific knowledge and benefit for individuals and society are the driving force behind clinical trials. These conflicts of interests become even more pronounced when dealing with populations rendered vulnerable by virtue of poverty and ignorance. South Asia with its teeming millions represents one such region. This essay examines the reasons that make this population vulnerable to exploitation. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Dr Brigitte E. S. Jansen (2002). Modern Medicine and Biotechnology: An Ethical Conflict of Interest? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):319-325.score: 663.0
    When confronting the issues related to developments in modern medicine and biotechnology, we must repeatedly ask ourselves anew what can and cannot be justified in an ethical sense. For radically new ethical questions seem to arise through innovative techniques such as stem cell research or preimplantation diagnosis — and with them new areas of conflicting interests. If one scrutinizes the previous positions related to this subject, it becomes conspicuous that a multitude of questions has quickly piled up — however, (as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.) (2001). Conflict of Interest in the Professions. Oxford University Press.score: 656.0
    Conflicts of interest pose special problems for the professions. Even the appearance of a conflict of interest can undermine essential trust between professional and public. This volume is a comprehensive and accessible guide to the ramifications and problems associated with important issue. It contains fifteen new essays by noted scholars and covers topics in law, medicine, journalism, engineering, financial services, and others.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jessica S. Ancker & Annette Flanagin (2007). A Comparison of Conflict of Interest Policies at Peer-Reviewed Journals in Different Scientific Disciplines. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):147-157.score: 656.0
    Scientific journals can promote ethical publication practices through policies on conflicts of interest. However, the prevalence of conflict of interest policies and the definition of conflict of interest appear to vary across scientific disciplines. This survey of high-impact, peer-reviewed journals in 12 different scientific disciplines was conducted to assess these variations. The survey identified published conflict of interest policies in 28 of 84 journals (33%). However, when representatives of 49 of the 84 journals (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Sheldon Krimsky & L. S. Rothenberg (2001). Conflict of Interest Policies in Science and Medical Journals: Editorial Practices and Author Disclosures. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):205-218.score: 656.0
    This study examines the extent to which scientific and biomedical journals have adopted conflict of interest (COI) policies for authors, and whether the adoption and content of such policies leads to the publishing of authors’ financial interest disclosure statements by such journals. In particular, it reports the results of a survey of journal editors about their practices regarding COI disclosures. About 16 percent of 1396 highly ranked scientific and biomedical journals had COI policies in effect during 1997. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ioana Ispas (2002). Conflict of Interest From a Romanian Geneticist's Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):363-381.score: 656.0
    This paper examines Romanian bioethics regulations for biomedical sciences, looking in particular at the genetics area as a source for conflict of interest. The analysis is focused on the organizational level, national regulations, the sources for generating conflicts of interest, and management of conflicts. Modern biotechnology and gene technology are among the key technologies of the twenty-first century. The application of gene technology for medical and pharmaceutical purposes is widely accepted by society, but the same cannot be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Pēteris Zilgalvis (2002). The Council of Europe's Instruments on Biomedical Research: How is Conflict of Interest Addressed? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):277-281.score: 656.0
    Conflict of interest is an issue that has been put in the spotlight by the commercial application of the new biomedical technologies. This paper presents the approach of the Council of Europe and the binding legal instruments to deal with this problem. The main focus is on the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, and its draft additional Protocol on Biomedical Research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Lisa Cosgrove & Harold J. Bursztajn (2010). Strengthening Conflict‐of‐Interest Policies in Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (1):21-24.score: 639.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Arrigo Schieppati, Norberto Perico & Giuseppe Remuzzi (2002). Conflict of Interest as Seen From a Researcher's Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):337-342.score: 639.0
    The continuous growth of the pharmaceutical industry is expected to require a considerable output of new drugs, with speedy development and approval processes. This profit-driven expansion of the drug market may broaden the already established erosion of the role of academia in favor of commercial clinical research organizations. Less and less control on the clinical trial design, its conduct and the resulting publication[s] is the likely consequence. Academic medicine and governments should find means to sustain the development of independent clinical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. A. Górski (2001). Conflict of Interest and its Significance in Science and Medicine: A View From Eastern Europe. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):307-312.score: 630.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ross Upshur, Stephen Buetow, Michael Loughlin & Andrew Miles (2006). Can Academic and Clinical Journals Be in Financial Conflict of Interest Situations? The Case of Evidence‐Based Incorporated. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):405-409.score: 575.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Chris MacDonald, Michael McDonald & Wayne Norman (2002). Charitable Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):67 - 74.score: 569.0
    This paper looks at conflicts of interest in the not-for-profit sector. It examines the nature of conflicts of interest and why they are of ethical concern, and then focuses on the way not-for-profit organisations are especially prone to and vulnerable to conflict-of-interest scandals. Conflicts of interest corrode trust; and stakeholder trust (particularly from donors) is the lifeblood of most charities. We focus on some specific challenges faced by charitable organisations providing funding for scientific (usually medical) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Chris Provis (2008). "Guanxi" and Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):57 - 68.score: 569.0
    "Guanxi" involves interpersonal obligations, which may conflict with other obligations people have that are based on general or abstract moral considerations. In the West, the latter have been widely accepted as the general source of obligations, which is perhaps tied to social changes associated with the rise of capitalism. Recently, Western ethicists have started to reconsider the extent to which personal relationships may form a distinct basis for obligation. In administration and management, salient bases for decision-Making include deontological, consequentialist (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Laurence J. Hirsch (2002). Conflicts of Interest in Drug Development: The Practices of Merck & Co., Inc. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):429-442.score: 560.0
    Conflicts of interest are common and exist in academia, government, and many industries, including pharmaceutical development. Medical journal editors and others have recently criticized “the pharmaceutical industry,” citing concerns over investigator access to data, approaches to analysis of clinical trial data, and publication practices. Merck & Co., Inc. is a global, research-driven pharmaceutical company that discovers, develops, manufactures, and markets a broad range of human and animal health products, directly and through its joint ventures. Although part of its mission (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ronald M. Davis, Anne Victoria Neale & Joseph C. Monsur (2003). Medical Journals' Conflicts of Interest in the Publication of Book Reviews. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):471-483.score: 560.0
    The purpose of the study was to assess medical journals’ conflicts of interest in the publication of book reviews. We examined book reviews published in 1999, 2000, and 2001 (N=1,876) in five leading medical journals: Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine. The main outcome measure was journal publication of reviews of books that had been published by the journal’s own publisher, that had been (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Rebecca Ann Lind & Tammy Swenson-Lepper (2013). Measuring Sensitivity to Conflicts of Interest: A Preliminary Test of Method. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):43-62.score: 560.0
    This study presents and develops test methods for assessing sensitivity to conflict of interest (COIsen). We are aware of no study assessing COIsen, but note that some popular methods for assessing ethical sensitivity and related constructs (which include COIsen) are flawed in that their presentation of stimulus material to subjects actually guides subjects to attend to ethical (or related) issues. The method tested here was designed to avoid this flaw. Using adaptations of two existing cases, a quota sample (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Roy G. Spece, David S. Shimm & Allen E. Buchanan (eds.) (1996). Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Practice and Research. Oxford University Press.score: 560.0
    Our society has long sanctioned, at least tacitly, a degree of conflict of interest in medical practice and clinical research as an unavoidable consequence of the different interests of the physician or clinical investigator, the patient or clinical research subject, third party payers or research sponsors, the government, and society as a whole, to name a few. In the past, resolution of these conflicts has been left to the conscience of the individual physician or clinical investigator and to (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Howard Brody (2011). Clarifying Conflict of Interest. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):23 - 28.score: 549.0
    As the debate over how to manage or discourage physicians? financial conflicts of interest with the drug and medical device industries has become more heated, critics have questioned or dismissed the concept of ?conflict of interest? itself. A satisfactory definition relates conflict of interest to concerns about maintaining social trust and distinguishes between breaches of ethical duty and temptations to breach duty. Numerous objections to such a definition have been offered, none of which prevails on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lee Wilkins (1995). Covering Antigone: Reporting on Conflict of Interest. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):23 – 36.score: 549.0
    Coverage of conflicts of interests for elected officials, political candidates, and political appointees is receiving increasing media attention. Based on an informal content analysis of the ethics codes of several professions, this article outlines current definitions of conflict of interest and links those concepts to philiosophical thinking about professional obligation. An extended definition of conflict of interest is provided, which is particularly appropriate to politicians, and a typology of how to think through and cover potential (...)-of-interest stories is suggested. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. A. Gold & P. S. Appelbaum (2011). Unconscious Conflict of Interest: A Jewish Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (7):402-405.score: 549.0
    In contemporary medicine, it is not always obvious whether the acceptance of a benefit constitutes a conflict of interest. A particular area of controversy has been the impact of small gifts or other benefits from pharmaceutical companies on physicians' behaviour. Typically, in such cases, the gift is not an explicit reward for cooperation; the physician does not perceive the gift as an attempt to influence his or her judgement; and the reward is relatively minor. Under these circumstances, physicians (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Anne Rowan-Legg, Charles Weijer, J. Gao & C. Fernandez (2009). A Comparison of Journal Instructions Regarding Institutional Review Board Approval and Conflict-of-Interest Disclosure Between 1995 and 2005. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):74-78.score: 549.0
    OBJECTIVES: To compare 2005 and 1995 ethics guidelines from journal editors to authors regarding requirements for institutional review board (IRB) approval and conflict-of-interest (COI) disclosure. DESIGN: A descriptive study of the ethics guidelines published in 103 English-language biomedical journals listed in the Abridged Index Medicus in 1995 and 2005. Each journal was reviewed by the principal author and one of four independent reviewers. RESULTS: During the period, the proportion of journals requiring IRB approval increased from 42% (95% CI (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. James Coyne (2005). Lessons in Conflict of Interest: The Construction of the Martyrdom of David Healy and The Dilemma of Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):W3-W14.score: 549.0
    Bioethics journals have lagged behind medical and science journals in exploring the threat of conflict of interest (COI) to the integrity of publications. Some recent discussions of COI that have occurred in the bioethics literature are reviewed. Discussions of what has been termed the ?Healy affair? unintentionally demonstrate that the direct and indirect influence of undisclosed COI may come from those who call for protection from the undue influence of industry. Paradoxically, the nature and tone of current discussions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Sarah Roberts-Cady (2010). Conflict of Interest in Industry-Sponsored Clinical Research. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):47-59.score: 549.0
    Private industry funds more than half of all medical research in the United States. While industry involvement in research has benefits, it can also create conflicts of interest. The most common policies adopted to address conflict of interest in medical research are focused primarily on the ways in which industry sponsorship may undermine a clinician’s judgment regarding patient care. Insufficient attention has been given to the ways in which industry sponsorship may undermine judgment relative to the goal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. G. K. Silverman, G. F. Loewenstein, B. L. Anderson, P. A. Ubel, S. Zinberg & J. Schulkin (2010). Failure to Discount for Conflict of Interest When Evaluating Medical Literature: A Randomised Trial of Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):265-270.score: 549.0
    Context Physicians are regularly confronted with research that is funded or presented by industry. Objective To assess whether physicians discount for conflicts of interest when weighing evidence for prescribing a new drug. Design and setting Participants were presented with an abstract from a single clinical trial finding positive results for a fictitious new drug. Physicians were randomly assigned one version of a hypothetical scenario, which varied on conflict of interest: ‘presenter conflict’, ‘researcher conflict’ and ‘no (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Dale Murray & Heather Certain (2007). Pharmaceutical “Gift-Giving,” Medical Education, and Conflict of Interest. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):335-343.score: 549.0
    In this essay, we argue that the acceptance of gifts by health professionals from the pharmaceutical industry is morally problematic. We conclude that whether physicians view the receipt of items from drug detailers as entitlements or gifts, this practice is unacceptable, as it constitutes a conflict of interest. In addition, we argue that these gifts are particularly problematic in academic hospitals. Physicians-in-training are inculcated with the belief that receiving gifts is morally acceptable. The cumulative effect of these worries (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Zachariah Sharek, Robert E. Schoen & George Loewenstein (2012). Bias in the Evaluation of Conflict of Interest Policies. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):368-382.score: 549.0
    Physicians are affected by the conflict of interest (COI) policies they help formulate. This study examines whether physicians evaluate these policies impartially. One hundred and seventy-nine physicians, 224 financial advisors, and 1,430 members of the general public evaluated the fairness and efficacy of a COI policy in either a medical or financial context. Physicians were more critical of the medical COI policy compared to a financial COI policy, while financial professionals displayed the reverse pattern and control respondents rated (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Paul J. Friedman (1992). The Troublesome Semantics of Conflict of Interest. Ethics and Behavior 2 (4):245 – 251.score: 540.0
    The sensible response to conflicts of interest is impaired by misconceptions and sloppy usage of terminology. Apparent and potential are widely misused modifiers for conflicts. Excessive legislative focus on financial interests limits understanding of the scope and significance of researchers' conflicts of interest. There is no moral or ethical failing in having a conflict of interest; the problem occurs when conflicts are not disclosed appropriately and when conflicts are allowed to bias research, teaching, or practice. Avoidance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Imogen Evans (2002). Conflict of Interest: The Importance of Potential. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):393-396.score: 540.0
    The UK Medical Research Council (MRC) takes the issue of conflict of interest very seriously. The overall aim is to preserve a climate in which personal and organisational innovation can flourish while ensuring that potential conflicts are disclosed and identified and conflicts are either avoided or managed with integrity. The approach needs to encompass the MRC’s various responsibilities and the levels at which conflicts might arise: MRC staff (scientists and administrators); the governing Council; research Boards and committees; external (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bozidar Vrhovac (2002). Conflict of Interest in Croatia: Doctors with Dual Obligations. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):309-316.score: 540.0
    There is an emerging awareness of the possibility of conflicts of interest in the practice of medicine in Croatia. The paper examines areas within the medical profession where conflicts of interest can and have occurred, probably not only in Croatia. Particularly addressed are situations when a doctor may have dual obligations and how independent ethics committees can help in decreasing the influence of a conflict of interest. The paper also presents extracts from the Croatian Code of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ronald M. Green (1990). Physicians, Entrepreneurism and the Problem of Conflict of Interest. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (4).score: 540.0
    This paper examines the ethical issues of conflict of interest raised by the burgeoning development of physician involvement in for-profit entrepreneurial activities outside their practice. After documenting the nature and extent of these activities, and their potential for conflicts of interest, the paper assesses the major arguments for and against physicians' referral of patients to facilities they own or in which they invest. The paper concludes that an outright ban on such activity seems ethically warranted.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Thomas E. Borcherding & Darren Filson (2001). Conflict of Interest in the Hollywood Film Industry. In Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.), Conflict of Interest in the Professions. Oxford University Press. 249.score: 540.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sandra L. Borden & Michael S. Pritchard (2001). Conflict of Interest in Journalism. In Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.), Conflict of Interest in the Professions. Oxford University Press. 73--91.score: 540.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Eric W. Oris (2001). Conflict of Interest on Corporate Boards. In Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.), Conflict of Interest in the Professions. Oxford University Press. 129.score: 540.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000