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Profile: John Locke
  1. John Locke, An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume 1 MDCXC, Based on the 2nd Edition, Books 1 And.
  2. John Locke, An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume 2 MDCXC, Based on the 2nd Edition, Books 3 And.
  3. John Locke, Concerning Civil Government 2nd Essay.
  4. John Locke, Further Considerations Concerning Raising the Value of Money.
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  5. John Locke, On Conquest.
    175. THOUGH governments can originally have no other rise than that before mentioned, nor polities be founded on anything but the consent of the people, yet such have been the disorders ambition has filled the world with, that in the noise of war, which makes so great a part of the history of mankind, this consent is little taken notice of; and, therefore, many have mistaken the force of arms for the consent of the people, and reckon conquest as one (...)
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  6. John Locke, Some Considerations of the Consequences of the Lowering of Interest, and Raising the Value of Money.
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  7. John Locke, Short Observations on a Printed Paper.
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  8. John Locke, Short Observations on a Printed Paper Entitled "for Encouraging the Coining Silver Money in England.
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  9. John Locke, Some Thoughts Concerning Education.
  10. John Locke, Two Treatises of Government: Of Civil Government Book II.
  11. John Locke, Two Treatises of Government: Second Treatise.
  12. John Locke, The Works of John Locke (in 9 Vols.).
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  13. John Locke, The Lockean Theory.
    ... a thinking intelligent Being, that has reason and reflection, and can consider itself as itself, the same thinking thing in different times and places; which it only does by the consciousness, which is inseparable from thinking ... [Essay II, xxvii, '9].
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  14. John Locke (forthcoming). Nature as Economic Resource. Environmental Ethics: The.
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  15. John Locke (2013). A Letter Concerning Toleration. Broadview Press.
    Locke argued that religious belief ought to be compatible with reason, that no king, prince or magistrate rules legitimately without the consent of the people, and that government has no right to impose religious beliefs or styles of worship on the public. Locke's defense of religious tolerance and freedom of thought was revolutionary in its time. Even today, his letter poses a challenge to religious intolerance, whether state-sponsored or originating from religious dogmatists. -/- Based on both Locke's original Latin and (...)
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  16. John L. Locke & Catherine M. Flanagan (2013). The Need for Psychological Needs: A Role for Social Capital. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):495-496.
    Van de Vliert embraces a model of human needs, underplaying a model whereby individuals, motivated by psychological needs, develop coping strategies that help them meet their personal goals and collectively exert an influence on social and economic systems. Undesirable climates may inflate the value of financial capital, but they also boost the value of social capital.
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  17. John Locke (2011). John Locke, Christian Mission, and Colonial America. Modern Intellectual History 8 (2):267-297.
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  18. John Locke (2011). Zasady filozofii przyrody. Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia:137-156.
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  19. John Locke (2009). Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits. In Timothy J. McGrew, Marc Alspector-Kelly & Fritz Allhoff (eds.), The Philosophy of Science: An Historical Anthology. Wiley-Blackwell. 206.
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  20. John Locke (2009). Social Contract and the State as Agent. In Matt Zwolinski (ed.), Arguing About Political Philosophy. Routledge. 8--52.
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  21. John Locke (2009). Selection From An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  22. John Locke (2009). The State of Nature and the Law of Nature. In Matt Zwolinski (ed.), Arguing About Political Philosophy. Routledge. 8--13.
     
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  23. John Locke (2008/1995). An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Oxford University Press.
    The book also includes a chronological table of significant events, select bibliography, succinct explanatory notes, and an index--all of which supply ...
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  24. John L. Locke (2008). The Trait of Human Language: Lessons From the Canal Boat Children of England. Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):347-361.
    To fully understand human language, an evolved trait that develops in the young without formal instruction, it must be possible to observe language that has not been influenced by instruction. But in modern societies, much of the language that is used, and most of the language that is measured, is confounded by literacy and academic training. This diverts empirical attention from natural habits of speech, causing theorists to miss critical features of linguistic practice. To dramatize this point, I examine data (...)
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  25. John Locke (2007). Essay Concerning Human Understanding. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd..
     
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  26. John Locke (2007). Second Treatise on Government. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd..
  27. John Locke (2007). The Exercise of Reason. In Randall R. Curren (ed.), Philosophy of Education: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub..
  28. John L. Locke (2007). Bimodal Signaling in Infancy: Motor Behavior, Reference, and the Evolution of Spoken Language. Interaction Studies 8 (1):159-175.
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  29. John L. Locke (2007). Vocal Innovation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):415-416.
    An important form of innovation involves use of the voice in a new way, usually to solve some environmental problem. Vocal innovation occurs in humans and other animals, including chimpanzees. The framework outlined in the target article, appropriately modified, may permit new perspectives on the use of others as tools, especially by infants, and the evolution of speech and language.
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  30. John Locke & P. Laslett (2007). John Locke, From TwoTreatises of Government (1690). In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub.. 93.
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  31. John Locke (2006). Two Treatises of Government: In the Former, the False Principles and Foundation of Sir Robert Filmer, and His Followers Are Detected and Overthrown; the Latter is an Essay Concerning the True Original, Extent, and End of Civil-Government. Lawbook Exchange.
    ... i . La very is so vile and miserable an Estate of Man,and so directly opposite to the generous Temper and Courage of our Nation ; that 'tis hardly to be ...
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  32. John L. Locke (2006). Parental Selection of Vocal Behavior. Human Nature 17 (2):155-168.
    Although all natural languages are spoken, there is no accepted account of the evolution of a skill prerequisite to language—control of the movements of speech. If selection applied at sexual maturity, individuals achieving some command of articulate vocal behavior in previous stages would have enjoyed unusual advantages in adulthood. I offer a parental selection hypothesis, according to which hominin parents apportioned care, in part, on the basis of their infants’ vocal behavior. Specifically, it is suggested that persistent or noxious crying (...)
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  33. John L. Locke & Barry Bogin (2006). Language and Life History: A New Perspective on the Development and Evolution of Human Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):259-280.
    It has long been claimed that Homo sapiens is the only species that has language, but only recently has it been recognized that humans also have an unusual pattern of growth and development. Social mammals have two stages of pre-adult development: infancy and juvenility. Humans have two additional prolonged and pronounced life history stages: childhood, an interval of four years extending between infancy and the juvenile period that follows, and adolescence, a stage of about eight years that stretches from juvenility (...)
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  34. John L. Locke & Barry Bogin (2006). Life History and Language: Selection in Development. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):301-311.
    Language, like other human traits, could only have evolved during one or more stages of development. We enlist the theoretical framework of human life history to account for certain aspects of linguistic evolution, with special reference to initial phases in the process. It is hypothesized that selection operated at several developmental stages, the earlier ones producing new behaviors that were reinforced by additional, and possibly more powerful, forms of selection during later stages, especially adolescence and early adulthood. Peer commentaries have (...)
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  35. John Locke (2005). The Selected Political Writings of John Locke: Texts, Background Selections, Sources, Interpretations. W.W. Norton.
  36. John Locke (2004). Selection From Essay Concerning Human Understanding. In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
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  37. John L. Locke (2004). Trickle-Up Phonetics: A Vocal Role for the Infant. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):516-516.
    Falk claims that human language took a step forward when infants lost their ability to cling and were placed on the ground, increasing their fears, which mothers assuaged prosodically. This claim, which is unsupported by anthropological and psychological evidence, would have done little for the syllabic and segmental structure of language, and ignores infants' own contribution to the process.
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  38. John Locke (2003). Extract From An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
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  39. Phillip E. Johnson, Thomas Kuhn, Abraham Lefkowitz, Henry Linville, John Locke, Helen Longino, Hermann Lotze, Arthur O. Lovejoy & Joseph Priestley (2002). Mead, George Herbert, 133,135,171 Mill, John Stuart, 55,188, 242. In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press.
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  40. John Locke (2002). John Locke: Essays on the Law of Nature: The Latin Text with a Translation, Introduction, and Notes ; Together with Transcripts of Locke's Shorthand in His Journal for 1676. Clarendon Press,Oxford University Press ;.
    Written before his better-known philosophical works, these essays fully explain how natural law is known and to what extent it is binding.
     
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  41. John Locke (2002). John Locke: Writings on Religion. Oxford University Press.
    Locke lived at a time of heightened religious sensibility, and religious motives and theological beliefs were fundamental to his philosophical outlook. Here, Victor Nuovo brings together the first comprehensive collection of Locke's writings on religion and theology. These writings illustrate the deep religious motivation in Locke's thought.
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  42. John L. Locke (2002). Dancing with Humans: Interaction as Unintended Consequence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):632-633.
    Parallels to Shanker & King's (S&K's) proposal for a model of language teaching that values dyadic interaction have long existed in language development, for the neotenous human infant requires care, which is inherently interactive. Interaction with talking caregivers facilitates language learning. The “new” paradigm thus has a decidedly familiar look. It would be surprising if some other paradigm worked better in animals that have no evolutionary linguistic history.
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  43. John Locke (2000). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Reasonableness of Christianity: As Delivered In the Scriptures. Clarendon Press.
    In 1695 John Locke published The Reasonableness of Christianity, an enquiry into the foundations of Christian belief. He did so anonymously, to avoid public involvement in the fiercely partisan religious controversies of the day. In the Reasonableness Locke considered what it was to which all Christians must assent in faith; he argued that the answer could be found by anyone for themselves in the divine revelation of Scripture alone. He maintained that the requirements of Scripture were few and simple, and (...)
     
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  44. John Locke (1998). Theodore M. Benditt. In N. Scott Arnold, Theodore M. Benditt & George Graham (eds.), Philosophy Then and Now. Blackwell Publishers. 445.
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  45. John Locke (1997). Collected Works of John Locke. Routledge.
    This first octavo edition of John Locke's Works has set the pattern for all subsequent English Works editions until the present time. It contains all the famous philosophical writings, as well as a life of the author based on that of Le Clerc but using a large number of unpublished letters. For the first time all correspondence is placed together, and the non-correspondence items in Desmaizeaux's Collection are repositioned to follow the relevant works. Set in context with a new introduction (...)
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  46. Victor Nuovo & John Locke (eds.) (1997). John Locke and Christianity: Contemporary Responses to the Reasonableness of Christianity. Thoemmes Press.
    The Reasonableness of Christianity is a major work by one of the greatest modern philosophers. Published anonymously in 1695, it entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labelled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions, and perhaps no one fully. This (...)
     
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  47. John Locke (1996). Of the Conduct of the Understanding: A Discourse of Miracles. Frommann-Holzboog.
  48. John Locke (1993/2003). Political Writings. Hackett Publishing.
    This comprehensive collection brings together the main published works (excluding polemical attacks on other people's views) with the most important surviving ...
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  49. John Locke (1990). Drafts for the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, and Other Philosophical Writings. Clarendon Press.
    This volume is the first of three which will contain all of Locke's extant writings on philosophy which relate to An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, other than those contained in volumes of the Clarendon Edition of John Locke such as the Correspondence. The book contains the two earliest known drafts of the Essay, both written in 1671, and provides for the first time an accurate version of Locke's text together with a record of virtually all his changes, in notes at (...)
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  50. John Locke (1990). Questions Concerning the Law of Nature. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction Robert Horwitz i . Locke and "The Thinkeing Men at Oxford" Enemies and admirers alike among John Locke's contemporaries, along with countless ...
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